Monday, February 20

Ivan Samuel Madray (1934-2009) Test Cap No:101

© sulekha.com
Full name Ivan Samuel Madray
Born July 2, 1934, Port Mourant, Berbice, British Guiana
Died April 23, 2009, Georgetown Public Hospital (aged 74 years 295 days)
Major teams West Indies, British Guiana, Lincolnshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak

Profile
Ivan Madray was a middle-order batsman and legbreak bowler who played two Tests against Pakistan in 1957-58 with no success, scoring three runs and taking one wicket. His first-class career consisted of only six matches and was over by the time he was 24. He subsequently moved to England and played for Lincolnshire.Former Guyana and West Indies cricketer Ivan Madray died aged 74 at the Georgetown Public Hospital on Thursday, a day after being admitted with hypertension.A middle-order batsman and leg break bowler, Madray played two Tests against Pakistan in 1957-58, scoring three runs and taking one wicket. His first-class career comprised six matches and was over by the time he was 24, after which he moved to England and played for Lincolnshire.

Conrad Cleophas Hunte (1932-1999) Test Cap No:98

Conrad Hunte poses with a bat....
© PA Photos
Full name Conrad Cleophas Hunte
Born May 9, 1932, Greenland Plantation, Shorey's Village, St Andrew, Barbados
Died December 3, 1999, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia (aged 67 years 208 days)
Major teams West Indies, Barbados
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium
Other Administrator

Profile
Conrad Hunte on tour in England,
© PA Photos
Sir Conrad Cleophas Hunte died of a heart attack after playing tennis in Sydney on December 3, 1999, aged 67. Conrad Hunte was one of the greatest West Indian batsmen of a great generation; he also played a major role in the reconstruction of South African cricket, and was a figure of moral authority in the wider world. As a batsman, Hunte could match anyone stroke-for-stroke, especially on the leg side, if he wanted. But he subdued his attacking nature in Test cricket to let his team-mates play their shots, a decision which was vital in making the West Indian side of the early 1960s one of the most complete of all time. It was an early signal of the determined thoughtfulness that was to stamp his whole life.

Conrad Hunte walks out.....
© PA Photos
Hunte was born in a one-room house on Barbados's Atlantic coast. His father worked on a sugar plantation, and Conrad was the oldest of nine children. He began playing cricket with the village boys at the age of six, using a palm-frond as a bat. His father was more anxious that he should get an education, and prevailed enough to ensure that his teenage son got work as a primary school teacher. But cricket slowly won the contest. Batting first in a representative match between two local leagues at Kensington Oval in 1950-51, Hunte was dropped on nought by Denis Atkinson, and went on to 137 not out. That secured him a place in the Barbados team when he was just 18, and he made 63 on debut against Trinidad. However, there was little first-class cricket in the Caribbean at that time, and his progress was frustratingly slow. He made 151 and 95 for Barbados in the important matches against E. W. Swanton's XI in 1955-56, and hoped that would get him selected for the 1957 tour of England.

Eric St Eval Atkinson (1927-1998) Test Cap No:97

Full name Eric St Eval Atkinson
Born November 6, 1927, Rockley, Christ Church, Barbados
Died May 29, 1998 (aged 70 years 204 days)
Major teams West Indies, Barbados
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium-fast

Profile
Eric St Eval Atkinson, who died after a long illness on May 29, 1998, aged 70, played eight Tests for West Indies in the late 1950s. He made his debut as a 30-year-old opening bowler at Bridgetown in 1957-58, alongside his older and better-known brother Denis, playing his last Test. The Atkinsons were the third pair of brothers to play together for West Indies, after the Grants and the Stollmeyers; there have been none since. In his second game, at Sabina Park a month later, Eric took five for 42, a performance that was somewhat overshadowed by Garry Sobers's 365 not out.

A tearaway bowler in his youth, Atkinson was not very successful when he first played for Barbados: three wickets in his first nine matches. But he had settled down to bowl fast-medium swing by the time he got into the Test team; he was said to have used reverse swing long before anyone had a name for it. Atkinson was chosen to tour the subcontinent a year later and, in his last Test, helped set up victory at Lahore with figures of 12-8-15-3, as Pakistan were bowled out for 104.

Test debut West Indies v Pakistan at Bridgetown, Jan 17-23, 1958
Last Test Pakistan v West Indies at Lahore, Mar 26-31, 1959
First-class span 1949-1959

F.C Murray Alexander (1928-2011) Test Cap No:96

© Getty image
Full name Franz Copeland Murray Alexander
Born November 2, 1928, Kingston, Jamaica
Died April 16, 2011, Orange Grove, St Andrew, Jamaica (aged 82 years 165 days)
Major teams West Indies, Cambridge University, Jamaica
Batting style Right-hand bat
Fielding position Wicketkeeper

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Gerry Alexander, Lance Gibbs, Chester Watson and Jackie Hendriks,
 in Brisbane for the 40-year reunion of the tied Test..........
© Getty Images
Franz Copeland Murray "Gerry" Alexander was a Jamaican cricketer who played 25 Tests for the West Indies. He was a wicket-keeper who had 90 dismissals in his 25 Test appearances and, though his batting average was around 30 in both Test and first class cricket, his only first-class century came in a Test on the 1960-61 tour of Australia.Alexander was the last white man to captain the West Indies cricket team. He led the West Indies against Pakistan at home in 1958, on the tour of India and Pakistan in 1958-59 and against England in 1960. He would not tolerate the indiscipline of Roy Gilchrist on the tour of India and sent him home before the team reached Pakistan.He was educated at Wolmer’s Boys' School, which was founded in 1729 and is one of the oldest schools in the West Indies. He then attended Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge. He played for the Cambridge cricket team in both 1952 and 1953, winning a Blue in both years for appearing in the University Match against Oxford. He also won a Blue at football, and went on to win an England amateur cap and an FA Amateur Cup winner’s medal in 1953 playing for Pegasus. He played cricket for Cambridgeshire in 1954 and 1955.

Nyron Sultan Asgarali (1920-2006) Test Cap No:95

© T & T Express
Full name Nyron Sultan Asgarali
Born December 28, 1920, St James, Trinidad
Died November 5, 2006, Trinidad (aged 85 years 312 days)
Major teams West Indies, Trinidad
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium

Profile
Nyron Asgarali takes a brilliant catch to dismiss Peter Richardson..
© Getty Images
Nyron Asgarali was an opening bat with a solid defence who established himself for Trinidad by scoring 103, 128 and 83 in successive matches against British Guiana in 1951-52. Curiously his first-class career spanned 20 years but he played only 50 games, and did not play more than three first-class games in any season save the 1957 tour of England, when he made 21 appearances. By this stage he was 37 years old, and although he struggled in his two Tests, he totalled 1011 runs on the tour at an average of 29.73. He had previously played cricket for Enfield in the Lancashire leagues, and this local knowledge was probably a factor in his selection.In later years he served on the South Management committee of the Trinidad Cricket Council. He managed the 1983 Trinidad and Tobago Shell Shield teams and served as liaison officer to the visiting Australia, New Zealand and England teams 1984-86.

Test debut England v West Indies at Lord's, Jun 20-22, 1957
Last Test England v West Indies at The Oval, Aug 22-24, 1957
First-class span 1940-1963

Roy Gilchrist (1934-2001) Test Cap No:93

© deccanchronicle.com
Full name Roy Gilchrist
Born June 28, 1934, Seaforth, St Thomas, Jamaica
Died July 18, 2001, Portmore, St Catherine, Jamaica (aged 67 years 20 days)
Major teams West Indies, Hyderabad (India), Jamaica
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast

Profile
Cover image of Hit Me For Six by Roy Gilchrist
Roy Gilchrist, died at Portmore, St Catherine, in his native Jamaica on July 18, 2001, aged 67. The image of a bowler of genuinely high pace stricken with Parkinson's disease is a dolorous one, but such was Roy Gilchrist's fate. Following his brief but dramatic Test career, he had lived in England for many years, marrying and, not always in peaceful accord, rearing seven children before returning to the West Indies in 1985. He was accorded a ready welcome, but he was troubled by his health and by persistent hard times. His childhood on a sugar plantation had been impoverished and rough, and, in Michael Manley's sympathetic analysis, he was "burdened by those tensions which so often run like scars across the landscape of the personalities of people who come from poverty".

Certainly he was awkward to manage, insufferably so at times, and his Test career came to a precipitate termination in 1958-59 when his hard-pressed captain, Gerry Alexander, with the support of the senior players, dispatched "Gilly" home from India before the Pakistan leg of West Indies' tour of the subcontinent. Constant friction with Alexander off the field, coupled with over-aggressive bowling on it, including the unacceptable use of the beamer, was the cause. Banished from the international scene, he found professional slots in England, where he had toured in 1957 with mixed fortune. He played in the Lancashire leagues for a variety of clubs, including Middleton (for whom he took a total of 280 wickets in 1958 and 1959), going on to take 100 wickets every year until 1979. However, tales of atrocity, some perhaps arising from the proverbial tendency to give a dog a bad name, continued to emerge about his violently over-reactive attitude to batsmen and his unsparing use of the bouncer. Even charity matches were not free from his ferocious assaults: on one such occasion, at Werneth, that resolute Australian Cec Pepper luridly but successfully remonstrated with Gilchrist in terms not suitable to print.
Peter Loader bowls Roy Gilchrist to take a hat-trick,
England v West Indies, Headingley, 25 July, 1957....
© The Cricketer International

Gilchrist's venomous bowling was the expression of a fiery, hostile personality. Of medium height, but long-armed and strong, he spearheaded, along with the young Wes Hall, the late 20th-century West Indian phalanx of unremittingly fast bowlers. Not since the heady days of Learie Constantine and Manny Martindale had they enjoyed so forceful an attack. Although Gilchrist's 21 wickets had cost almost 31 each when Pakistan toured the Caribbean in 1957-58, he was demonic in India, taking 26 in his four Tests at 16.11. In his best Test figures of six for 55, at Calcutta, five were bowled. All told, his 57 Test wickets in 13 outings averaged 26.68, while in 42 first-class matches his haul was 167 at 26, including one astonishing return of six for 16 at Nagpur when the West Indians bowled out a Combined Universities XI for 49. Roy Gilchrist played only five times for Jamaica, between 1956-57 and 1961-62, and he also had six games for Indian sides in 1962-63, when a number of West Indians were recruited to harden Indian batsmen to pace bowling.

Test debut England v West Indies at Birmingham, May 30-Jun 4, 1957
Last Test India v West Indies at Delhi, Feb 6-11, 1959
First-class span 1956-1963

Alphonso Roberts (1937-1996) Test Cap No:92

©statemaster.com
Full name Alphonso Theodore Roberts
Born September 18, 1937, Kingstown, St Vincent
Died July 24, 1996, Montreal, Quebec, Canada (aged 58 years 310 days)
Major teams West Indies, Trinidad & Tobago, Windward Islands
Batting style Right-hand bat

Profile
Born in Saint Vincent and the Grenadines on September 18, 1937, Alfie Roberts attended St. George’s Anglican School and then St. Vincent Boy's Grammar School. While at the Grammar School, Roberts excelled in both soccer and cricket and, upon the recommendation of cricket great Sir Everton Weekes, he was awarded a scholarship to Queen's Royal College in Trinidad and Tobago. It was during this period that he was selected to the West Indies cricket team. Along with Sir Everton Weekes and the legendary Gary Sobers, he toured New Zealand with the West Indies team in 1955-56. He was only 18 years of age, one of the youngest ever to play international cricket.

Alfie Roberts’ interest in education and politics took precedence over sport and by 1961 he was no longer playing competitive cricket. Between 1958 and 1962, he worked as a civil servant for the government of St. Vincent before emigrating to Canada to attend Sir George Williams University (now Concordia University) in Montreal.The first `small islander' to represent West Indies, Alphonso Theodore Roberts died in Montreal of gall-bladder cancer on July 24, aged 59. An innings of 74 for the Combined Islands against Trinidad in March 1955 brought the young man from St. Vincent to prominence, and at 19 he was selected for the following winter's tour of New Zealand. His solitary cap came at Auckland, where he made 28 and 0 in the match which saw NZ record their first Test victory after 26 years of trying. After the tour, on which he made only 137 runs, he moved to Trinidad, where he encountered criticism from some who objected to his selection ahead of local-born players. He soon returned to St. Vincent, leaving former West Indian captain Jeff Stollmeyer lamenting that ` Trinidad was the great loser for missing such a great talent and yet so young'.

Norman Edgar Marshall (1924-2007) Test Cap No:89

© The Nation
Full name Norman Edgar Marshall
Born February 27, 1924, Welchman Hall Plantation, St Thomas, Barbados
Died August 11, 2007, Hastings, Christ Church (aged 83 years 165 days)
Major teams West Indies, Barbados, Trinidad & Tobago
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm offbreak

Profile
Although Roy Marshall gained more prominence through his exploits as Hampshire's flamboyant opening batsman, his brother Norman, six years his senior, was a valuable allrounder for Barbados and, briefly, for Trinidad during a lengthy career that coincided with the emergence of West Indies as a genuine force in the world game. He overcame a discouraging debut for Barbados, aged 17 (out for 0, batting No.11, and conceding 100 runs from 15 wicketless eight-ball overs against Trinidad) to develop into a sound batsman and a quickish, miserly offspinner. When Roy joined him at Barbados in 1946, aged 15 years nine months, then the West Indies' youngest first-class cricketer,

Cyril Clairmonte Depeiaza (1928-1995) Test Cap No:88

© The Cricketer International
Full name Cyril Clairmonte Depeiaza
Born October 10, 1928, Mount Standfast, St James, Barbados
Died November 10, 1995, Manchester, Lancashire, England (aged 67 years 31 days)
Major teams West Indies, Barbados
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm bowler
Fielding position Wicketkeeper

Profile
Co-holder of the Test seventh-wicket record, Cyril Clairmonte Depeiaza died in November at the age of 67. When `Leaning Tower' Depeiaza joined his captain and fellow Barbadian Denis Atkinson at the crease in the fourth Test against Australia at Bridgetown in May 1955, West Indies were 147 for 6 in reply to Australia's massive 668. In an epic, matchsaving stand the pair, who came together towards the end of the third day of the six-day Test, batted throughout the fourth day. In all they added 347, breaking the previous-best for that wicket by three runs. Their partnership remains a record for Test cricket, but was surpassed at first-class level last winter when Bhupinder Singh junior and Pankaj Dharmani put on 460 for Punjab's seventh wicket in their Ranji Trophy semi-final at Delhi.

Lennox Stephen Butler (1929-2009) Test Cap No:87

© bestoftrinidad.com
Full name Lennox Stephen Butler
Born February 9, 1929, Woodbrook, Port of Spain, Trinidad
Died September 1, 2009, Antigua (aged 80 years 204 days)
Major teams West Indies, Trinidad & Tobago
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast-medium

Profile
Lennox "Bunny" Butler had a brief first-class career as a fast-medium bowler. An irregular member of the Trinidad side, in 1954-55 he took 5 for 89 (his only first-class five-for) for them against the Australians, a performance which won him a place in the West Indies side for the second Test at Port of Spain. On a batsman's paradise, he took 2 for 151 as Australia ran up 600 for 9 and that was that. He played only one more first-class match, for Trinidad against EW Swanton's XI the following season.

Only Test West Indies v Australia at Port of Spain, Apr 11-16, 1955
First-class span 1948-1956

O'Neil Gordon Smith (1933-1959) Test Cap No:86

© Getty image
Full name O'Neil Gordon Smith
Born May 5, 1933, Boys Town, Kingston, Jamaica
Died September 9, 1959, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, England (aged 26 years 127 days)
Major teams West Indies, Jamaica
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm offbreak

Profile
© Getty image
O'Neill Gordon Smith, who died in hospital following injuries received in a motor-car accident, took part in 26 Test matches between 1955 and 1959, scoring 1,331 runs, including four centuries. His death came as a heavy blow to the West Indies, for much had been hoped from him against Peter May's MCC team last winter
Smith's interest in cricket began at the age of seven and, such was his rapid advance, he gained a place in the team at St. Alban's School, Jamaica, when nine and became captain inside three years. Later at Kingston College he progressed still further, but not till 1955 did he first appear for Jamaica. This was against the visiting Australians and he gave full evidence of his quality by playing an innings of 169, he and AP Binns putting on 277 for the sixth wicket. That performance earned him a place in the opening Test match and, by hitting 104 in the second innings, he joined the list of men who obtained a century on Test debut. His success in three other Tests in the series was limited - indeed, he was dismissed for 0 and 0 in the second - but, with characteristic cheerfulness, he did not allow setbacks to deter him and from 1956, when he toured New Zealand, his place in the team was firmly established.

Glendon Lionel Gibbs (1925-1979) Test Cap No:85

© stabroeknews.com
Full name Glendon Lionel Gibbs
Born December 27, 1925, Georgetown, Demerara, British Guiana
Died February 21, 1979, Georgetown, Demerara, Guyana (aged 53 years 56 days)
Major teams West Indies, British Guiana
Batting style Left-hand bat
Bowling style Slow left-arm orthodox

Profile
Glendon Lionel Gibbs, died at Georgetown, Guyana on February 21, aged 53. A left-handed opening bat with a sound defence and a slow left-arm bowler, he played for British Guiana throughout the 1950s, and is chiefly remembered for an innings of 216 against Barbados at Georgetown in 1952 when he and L. Wight, who scored 262, put on 390 for the first wicket; still a record for first-class cricket in the West Indies. In 1955 he played in the first Test against the Australians. He was, until his death, Secretary of the Guyana Cricket Board of Control and represented it on the West Indies Board of Control.

Clifford Aubrey McWatt (1922-1997) Test Cap No:83

Full name Clifford Aubrey McWatt
Born February 1, 1922, Georgetown, Demerara, British Guiana
Died July 20, 1997, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada (aged 75 years 169 days)
Major teams West Indies, British Guiana
Batting style Left-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm bowler
Fielding position Wicketkeeper

Profile
McWatt, Clifford Aubrey, died on July 12, 1997, aged 75, after a car crash in Canada. Cliff McWatt played for British Guiana from 1943-44 to 1956-57, and was one of the wicket-keepers tried by West Indies after Clyde Walcott injured his back and was forced to give up the job. McWatt was a useful left-hand batsman and a nimble keeper, who was Walcott's deputy on the 1948-49 tour of India but did not get his Test chance until five years later.

John Kenneth Constantine Holt (1923-1997) Test Cap No:82

Full name John Kenneth Constantine Holt
Born August 12, 1923, Kingston, Jamaica
Died June 3, 1997, Kingston, Jamaica (aged 73 years 295 days)
Major teams West Indies, Jamaica
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm offbreak

Profile
Known as J. K. Holt junior - his father played for Jamaica from 1906 to 1930 - John Kenneth Constantine Holt had an outstanding maiden Test series against England in 1953-54. On 94, in his First Test innings and at home at Sabina Park, he was adjudged leg-before by umpire Perry Burke, whose family were later attacked by aggrieved `cricket-lovers'.

Michael Campbell Frederick (1927-2014) Test Cap No:81

Full name Michael Campbell Frederick
Born May 6, 1927, Mile and a Quarter, St Peter, Barbados
Died June 18, 2014, May Pen, Jamaica (aged 87 years 43 days)
Major teams West Indies, Barbados, Derbyshire, Jamaica
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium

Profile
Michael Campbell Frederick (6 May 1927 – 18 June 2014) was a Barbadian cricketer who played one Test for the West Indies in 1954 and first-class cricket for Barbados in 1944-45, Derbyshire in 1949 and Jamaica in 1953-54.Frederick was born at Mile and a Quarter, St Peter, Barbados. He was educated at The Lodge School, well known as the cradle of cricket in Barbados, where he benefited from the coaching of Leslie Arthur "Bessie" Walcott.He played as a 17-year-old for Barbados in 1944-45, playing one first-class match against British Guiana.He went to England in time for the 1946 season and played an assortment of friendly matches for Derbyshire. He played for the Swarkestone Cricket Club, and from 1948 to 1950 he played for Derbyshire's second team, alongside fellow Barbadian Laurie Johnson.Johnson played fairly regularly in the first team in the 1949 season, but Frederick played only two first-class games, in one of which he was top scorer with 84.

Frederick next appeared in first-class cricket in the West Indies in 1953-54, playing in two matches for Jamaica against the MCC tourists. He scored a 50 in each match, and was drafted as an opening batsman for the First Test against England in 1954 at Sabina Park, Kingston. He scored 30 in the second innings after a duck in the first innings, and West Indies won the match by 140 runs.Frederick was dropped for the Second Test, and did not play first-class cricket again.He died after a fall. He was survived by his wife Eva and their children Andrew, Charles and Catherine.His cousin Robin Bynoe also played for the West Indies.

Only Test West Indies v England at Kingston, Jan 15-21, 1954
First-class span 1944-1954

George Leslie Wight (1929-2004) Test Cap No:79

© guyana-cricket.com
Full name George Leslie Wight
Born May 28, 1929, Georgetown, Demerara, British Guiana
Died January 4, 2004, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (aged 74 years 221 days)
Major teams West Indies, British Guiana
Batting style Right-hand bat

Profile
Leslie Wight, who played one Test for West Indies in 1952-53, was a member of a famous cricketing family from British Guiana (now Guyana). Three of his brothers also played first-class cricket, and one of them - Peter - had a long career in England, firstly with Somerset (1953-65) and then as an umpire (1966-95). In 1951-52 Wight amassed 262 not out in 708 minutes for British Guiana against Barbados at Georgetown, putting on 390 with Glendon Gibbs, who made 216. That remained a West Indian first-wicket record until 2000-01, when it was beaten by Leon Garrick (200*) and Chris Gayle (208*),

who put on an unbroken opening stand of 425 for Jamaica against West Indies B at Montego Bay. Wight was on the field throughout that match, which BG won by an innings, and early in 1953 he was called up for the fourth Test against India at Georgetown. He made 21, but was painfully slow - his first dozen runs took two hours - and although he helped Clyde Walcott (125) put on 71, he was never selected again. In all first-class cricket he made 1260 runs at the excellent average of 66.31.

Only Test West Indies v India at Georgetown, Mar 11-17, 1953
First-class span 1949-1953

Ralph Archibald Legall (1925-2003) Test Cap No:77

© ESPNcricinfo Ltd
Full name Ralph Archibald Legall
Born December 1, 1925, St Michael, Barbados
Died 2003, Believed to have died but details unavailable (aged 77 years days)
Major teams West Indies, Barbados, Trinidad & Tobago
Batting style Right-hand bat
Fielding position Wicketkeeper

Profile
Ralph Archibald Legall (born December 1, 1925, St Michael, Barbados, died (?) 2003) was a West Indian cricketer who played in four Tests in 1953.There is mystery surrounding Legall's death: he is variously reported to have died in Toronto, New York state or Trinidad, in 2003.

Test debut West Indies v India at Bridgetown, Feb 7-12, 1953
Last Test West Indies v India at Kingston, Mar 28-Apr 4, 1953
First-class span 1946-1958

Frank McDonald King (1926-1990) Test Cap No:75

Full name Frank McDonald King
Born December 14, 1926, Delamere Land, Brighton, St Michael, Barbados
Died December 23, 1990, Bescot, Walsall, Staffordshire, England (aged 64 years 9 days)
Major teams West Indies, Barbados, Trinidad & Tobago
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast

Profile
Frank McDonald King was a West Indian cricketer who played in 14 Tests between 1953 and 1956.Born in Delamere Land, Brighton, St Michael, Barbados, King was a hostile right-arm fast bowler who opened the bowling for the West Indies in three consecutive home series in the early 1950s. But he failed to build on a promising debut in the 1952-53 series against the Indian cricket team, when, with 17 wickets, he was the second highest wicket-taker after Alf Valentine. In the third Test of the series, he took five wickets for 74 runs in India's first innings, and also broke the hand of the Indian wicketkeeper, Ebrahim Maka. The report of the tour in Wisden for 1954, however, says that he "used the bumper a little too often for it to be a surprise ball".

Roy Edwin Marshall (1930-1992) Test Cap No:72

© Hampshire County Cricket Club
Full name Roy Edwin Marshall
Born April 25, 1930, Farmers Plantation, St Thomas, Barbados
Died October 27, 1992, Taunton, Somerset, England (aged 62 years 185 days)
Major teams West Indies, Barbados, Hampshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm offbreak

Profile
© Hampshire County Cricket Club
Only in cricket is it possible to savour that rare, marvellous amalgam of gentility and single-minded aggression. Roy Marshall was always in a hurry, rather like a nervous man hell-bent on catching a train. He did it with an apologetic shrug, implying he preferred the quiet life. But an afternoon at Southampton or Dean Park could never be too somnolent when he was at the wicket. It was invariably joyful. He made spectators gasp at his daring, sigh at his consummate fluency on good days.

It was usually accepted that the reason he went in first for Hampshire was that he simply couldn't bear to hang around for long, pads on and head buzzing over the technical complexities of the pitch or the opposing bowlers. Once he was out there, taking guard and adjusting his spectacles, any mental distractions had been exorcised. He was ready to go. The first ball was at times destined first bounce for the third-man boundary.

For the most part he was a master of style. He square-cut in the grand manner that Greenidge went on to emulate around the same parishes of the Solent. His on-and off-drives, especially the classically executed one through the covers, could be sublime. He was never afraid to hook. He had a dancer's feet and timing that will live timelessly in the minds of Hampshire romantics.

Alfred Louis Valentine (1930-2004) Test Cap No:71

Valentine on tour of England....
© Getty Images
Full name Alfred Louis Valentine
Born April 28, 1930, Kingston, Jamaica
Died May 11, 2004, Orlando, Florida, USA (aged 74 years 13 days)
Major teams West Indies, Jamaica
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Slow left-arm orthodox

Profile
Alf Valentine signs autographs.....
© Getty Images
Alf Valentine, who has died in America at the age of 74, was a vital cog in the first great West Indian team - the one that shocked England in 1950 by winning the series 3-1.England had been forewarned about the Three Ws - Frank Worrell, Everton Weekes and Clyde Walcott - who formed the batting spine of that strong 1950 side. But they hadn't expected to have to contend with two contrasting top-class spinners as well.

It was some of the most inspired selection by any Test side. Before the tour Valentine, who turned 20 shortly after he arrived in England from Jamaica, and Trinidad's Sonny Ramadhin, 21, had played just two first-class matches apiece - the trial games for selection. Although they didn't set the world alight - Valentine took only two wickets, for 190 - they obviously impressed someone, and were called up for the boat trip to the UK.

Valentine was tall, and bowled briskish left-arm spin with a whirling action. He ripped the ball savagely: one of his team-mates thought he could probably turn the ball on glass. Ramadhin, meanwhile, bowled a mystifying mixture of offbreaks and legspinners, with his sleeves rolled down (and often with his cap firmly in place).

Allan Fitzroy Rae (1922-2005) Test Cap No:69

© The Cricketer International
Full name Allan Fitzroy Rae
Born September 30, 1922, Rollington Town, Kingston, Jamaica
Died February 27, 2005, Kingston, Jamaica (aged 82 years 150 days)
Major teams West Indies, Jamaica
Batting style Left-hand bat
Other Administrator

Profile
Allan Rae, who died on February 27 aged 82 in his native Kingston after a long illness, was one of the vanishing breed of West Indies Test players who regarded their transition into administration as an undeniable duty. His productive, if brief, Test career as a solid left-handed opening batsman, dependable enough to average 46.18 in his 15 Tests, and his far longer involvement in management that saw him rise to the presidency of the West Indies Cricket Board of Control between 1981 and 1988, coincided with golden eras of West Indies cricket. Yet his administrative roles spanned two of the most contentious issues of the day - the intrusions of Kerry Packer's World Series Cricket in the late 1970s and apartheid-era South Africa in the 1980s. In spite of such challenges, West Indies were never stronger than during his presidency.

Francis James Cameron (1923-1994) Test Cap No:68

Full name Francis James Cameron
Born June 22, 1923, Kingston, Jamaica
Died June 10, 1994, Kingston, Jamaica (aged 70 years 353 days)
Major teams Canada, West Indies, Jamaica
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm offbreak

profile
Francis James "Jimmy" Cameron, born at Kingston, Jamaica on June 22, 1923 and died at Kingston, Jamaica on June 10, 1994, was a cricketer who played in 5 Tests for the West Indian in India in 1948-49.Cameron was a right-handed middle- or lower-order batsman and a right-arm off-break bowler. His first-class cricket career is one of the odder ones: he played only 21 first-class matches, and 14 of those were on the West Indies tour to India, Pakistan and Ceylon (Sri Lanka) in 1948-49, and another four were on the Canadian tour to England in 1954.

Denis St Eval Atkinson (1926-2001) Test Cap No:67

© Wisden Cricket Monthly
Full name Denis St Eval Atkinson
Born August 9, 1926, Rockley, Christ Church, Barbados
Died November 9, 2001, Barbados (aged 75 years 92 days)
Major teams West Indies, Barbados, Trinidad
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium, Right-arm offbreak
Profile
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A sound batsman and a bowler of medium-pace offcutters, Denis Atkinson made his debut in India in 1948-49, and was a Test regular in the mid-1950s. He was captain for three Tests against Australia in 1954-55, in the absence of Jeff Stollmeyer, and later led West Indies to a series victory in New Zealand. His finest hour, though, came in the fourth Test of that Australian series. Facing a total of 668, West Indies collapsed and were 146 for 6 when Atkinson and Clairmonte Depeiaza came together. In more than a day the pair added 347 for the seventh wicket, a first-class record for 40 years and still the best in Tests. Atkinson contributed 219, his career-highest, and also took seven wickets in the match. On his sole tour of England in 1957 he began memorably, taking 10 for 62 in the first match at Worcester, but later he was overworked and a strained shoulder affected his performance.

"I remember it like if it was yesterday."These were the words of the 72-year-old Denis St. Eval Atkinson as he recalled memories of the first Test of the 1948-49 series at the Feroz Shah Kotla in New Delhi, India.

Kenneth Roy Rickards (1923-1995) Test Cap No:66

Full name Kenneth Roy Rickards
Born August 22, 1923, Rollington Town, Kingston, Jamaica
Died August 21, 1995, Kingston, Jamaica (aged 71 years 364 days)
Major teams West Indies, Essex, Jamaica
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak

Profile
A forceful right-hand batsman whose opportunities at Test level for West Indies were limited by the considerable presence of the `Three Ws' in the middle order, Kenneth Roy Rickards died in Kingston, Jamaica on Aug 21, the day before his 72nd birthday.Ken Rickards caught the selectors' eyes with 112 not out for Jamaica against Gubby Allen's 1947-48 MCC tourists. Chosen for the final Test of the fifth wicket. He was a late addition to the team for the 1948-49 tour of India, but, hampered by a bout of typhoid, failed to win a Test place. His 330 runs (33.67) on the tour included 99 ( run out) against West Zone at Poona.

Esmond Seymour Maurice Kentish (1916-2011) Test Cap No:65

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Full name Esmond Seymour Maurice Kentish
Born November 21, 1916, Cornwall Mountain, Westmoreland, Jamaica
Died June 10, 2011, Jamaica (aged 94 years 201 days)
Major teams West Indies, Jamaica, Oxford University
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast-medium

Profile
Esmond Kentish was a medium-fast bowler who was renowned for his stamina. His two Test appearances were both against England - in 1947-48 and 1953-54 - and both on his home ground at Kingston. In the first game he took 3 for 106, but six years later turned in a match-winning 5 for 49 after a wicketless first innings, bowling on or outside leg stump to a seven-man leg-side field. Despite this he was not picked again. In 1956 Kentish, by then 39, won a Blue for Oxford, at the time the oldest man to do so. After retiring he became involved in cricket administration and managed several overseas tours. He was also a governor of the Bank of Jamaica. He died aged 94.

Hophnie Hobah Hines Johnson (1910-1987) Test Cap No:64

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Full name Hophnie Hobah Hines Johnson
Born July 13, 1910, Kingston, Jamaica
Died June 24, 1987, Miami, Florida, United States of America (aged 76 years 346 days)
Major teams West Indies, Jamaica
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast

Profile
Hophnie Hobah Hines Johnson (13 July 1910, Kingston, Jamaica – 24 June 1987, Miami, Florida, USA) was a West Indian cricketer. His first-class cricket career began with his debut for Jamaica in 1935 and lasted until 1951, interrupted by the Second World War. Making his international debut at the age of 37, his Test career lasted just three matches. All three were against England, and the last was in 1950. During his first Test Match, Johnson took five wickets in the first innings and five in the second.He was the first fast bowler to take ten wickets in a single Test for the West Indies, and held the record for best bowling figures by a West Indies player on debut until his 10/97 was bettered by spin bowler Alf Valentine. Johnson was 40 years old when he played his final Test.

John Trim (1915-1960) Test Cap No:63

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Full name John Trim
Born January 25, 1915, Corentyne, Berbice, British Guiana
© ESPNcricinfo Ltd
Died November 12, 1960, New Amsterdam, West Bank, Berbice, British Guiana (aged 45 years 292 days)
Major teams West Indies, British Guiana
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast-medium

Profile
John Trim (January 25, 1915 - – November 12, 1960) was a West Indian cricketer who played in four Tests from 1948 to 1952. A right-arm fast medium bowler and right-handed batsman from British Guiana, Trim's brief international career yielded 18 wickets at one of the lowest bowling averages of any completed career - 16.16 runs-per-wicket. His overall first class career was also short: thirty-four matches for British Guiana in which he took 96 wickets and made a solitary half-century with the bat.

His Test debut came during the 1947-48 tour of the West Indies by Gubby Allen's England team. Trim took two wickets for an economical six runs in his first outing, with a further wicket in England's second innings.It was Trim's only match of the series, but he would tour India in January 1949, taking 4/48 and 3/28 in Chennai and 3/69 in Mumbai.He was then selected for the West Indian tour of Australia 1951-52 and took his career-best figures: a maiden five wicket haul of 5/35 at the Melbourne Cricket Ground.Trim continued to play cricket in the Caribbean until 1953. He died in New Amsterdam, East Bank Berbice.

Test debut West Indies v England at Georgetown, Mar 3-6, 1948
Last Test Australia v West Indies at Melbourne, Dec 31, 1951 - Jan 3, 1952  
First-class span194 3-1953

Lancelot Richard Pierre (1921-1989) Test Cap No:62

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Full name Lancelot Richard Pierre
Born June 5, 1921, Woodbrook, Port of Spain, Trinidad
Died April 14, 1989, Port of Spain, Trinidad (aged 67 years 313 days)
Major teams West Indies, Trinidad
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast-medium

Profile
Lancelot (Lance) Richard Pierre, who died in his native Trinidad on April 14, 1989, aged 68, was one of a select group of fast bowlers to wear glasses. When he made his only tour, to England in John Goddard's 1950 side, Pierre, Hines Johnson and Prior Jones were expected to form no more than an adequate new-ball attack, but that this was correct did not matter because of the emergence of Ramadhin and Valentine as brilliant spinners. Pierre had a smooth action and high delivery, but he struggled against injury and could not produce the sharp edge of his earlier pace.

Frank Mortimer Maglinne Worrell (1924-1967) Test Cap No:61

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Full name Frank Mortimer Maglinne Worrell
Born August 1, 1924, Bank Hall, St Michael, Barbados
Died March 13, 1967, Mona, Kingston, Jamaica (aged 42 years 224 days)
Major teams West Indies, Barbados, Jamaica
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Left-arm fast-medium, Left-arm slow
Other Journalist
In a nutshell West Indies' first appointed black captain was also their most charismatic and influential. Though a fine, stylish batsman, it is as a strong captain and an uniting force that he will be remembered. The affection with which his team was received in Australia during the landmark tour of 1960-61 is enshrined in the trophy named after him, which the two teams play for to date.

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Sir Frank Worrell once wrote that the island of Barbados, his birthplace, lacked a hero. As usual, he was underplaying himself. Frank Maglinne Worrell was the first hero of the new nation of Barbados and anyone who doubted that had only to be in the island when his body was brought home in mid-March of 1967.Or in Westminster Abbey when West Indians of all backgrounds and shades of opinion paid their last respects to a man who had done more than any other of their countrymen to bind together the new nations of the Caribbean and establish a reputation for fair play throughout the world. Never before had a cricketer been honoured with a memorial service in Westminster Abbey.

Sir Frank was a man of strong convictions, a brave man, and it goes without saying, a great cricketer. Though he made his name as a player his greatest contribution was to destroy for ever the myth that a coloured cricketer was not fit to lead a team. Once appointed, he ended the cliques and rivalries between the players of various islands to weld together a team which in the space of five years became the champions of the world.

Andrew Gordon Ganteaume (1921-2016) Test Cap # 60

Full name Andrew GordonGanteaume
Born January 22, 1921, Belmont, Port of Spain, Trinidad
Died February 17, 2016, Santa Margarita (aged 95 years 26 days)
Major teams West Indies, Trinidad
Batting style Right-hand bat
Fielding position Wicketkeeper

Profile
In one respect Andy Ganteaume, a diminutive wicketkeeper-batsman, eclipsed even Don Bradman. Whereas Bradman ended his career with a Test average of 99.94, Gunteaume's was 112. On his Test debut, against England at Port-of-Spain in 1947-48, he scored 112 and yet he never played for West Indies again. West Indies had a formidable batting line-up around this time - it was the era of Walcott, Worrell, Weekes, Sobers, Kanhai, Rae, Stollmeyer and Gomez - and there were suggestions that he slowed down when nearing his hundred, possibly costing West Indies the chance of victory. Jeff Stollmeyer later wrote: "Andy's innings in its later stages was not in keeping with the state of the game and his captain [Gerry Gomez] was forced to send a message out to him to 'get on with it'." Stollmeyer did concede that Ganteaume was unlucky to miss out on selection for the tour of India the following year. Ganteaume continued to play for Trinidad, and in fact toured England as late as 1957 without getting into the Test side.

Clyde Leopold Walcott (1926-2006) Test Cap No:58

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Full name Clyde Leopold Walcott
Born January 17, 1926, New Orleans, St Michael, Barbados
Died August 26, 2006, Barbados (aged 80 years 221 days)
Major teams West Indies, Barbados, British Guiana
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast-medium
Fielding position Wicketkeeper
Other Referee, Coach, Administrator, Commentator

profile
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Sir Clyde Leopold Walcott, KA, GCM was a West Indian cricketer. Walcott was a member of the "three W's", the other two being Everton Weekes and Frank Worrell: all were very successful batsmen from Barbados, born within a short distance of each other in Bridgetown, Barbados in a period of 18 months from August 1924 to January 1926; all made their Test cricket debut against England in 1948. In the mid-1950s, Walcott was arguably the best batsman in the world.In later life, he had an active career as a cricket administrator, and was the first non-English and non-white chairman of the International Cricket Council.

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Walcott was born in New Orleans (Bridgetown), St. Michael, Barbados. His father was a printing engineer with the Barbados Advocate newspaper. He was educated at Combermere School and, from the age of 14, at Harrison College in Barbados. He took up wicket-keeping at Harrison College and also learned to bowl inswingers.He married Muriel Ashby in 1951. They had two sons together. His brother, Keith Walcott, and a son, Michael Walcott, both played first-class cricket for Barbados.

Walcott first played first-class cricket for Barbados in 1942, as a 16-year-old schoolboy. He made his first impression in February 1946, when, on a matting wicket, he scored 314 not out for Barbados against Trinidad as part of an unbroken stand of 574 for the fourth wicket with schoolfriend Frank Worrell (255 not out), setting a world record for any partnership in first-class cricket that remains a record in the West Indies.

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He played his first Test in January 1948, the drawn 1st Test against England at Bridgetown. Powerfully built, weighing 15 stone and 6"2' tall, he was an accomplished strokeplayer. From a crouched stance, he was particularly strong off the back foot, and quick to cut, drive or pull. Despite his height, Walcott also kept wicket for his country in his first 15 Tests, his versatility enabling to retain his position in the side despite some poor batting performances in his first few matches. By the time a back injury forced him to relinquish the gloves, his batting had improved sufficiently to enable him to keep his place. He became a good slip fielder, and was an occasional fast-medium bowler.In 1950, his unbeaten 168 in the second innings of the 2nd Test at Lord's helped the team to its first Test victory, and ultimately first series win in England, assisted by the spin bowling of Sonny Ramadhin and Alf Valentine. 

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He scored a century in both innings of two Tests in the series against Australia in 1955, when he became the first batsman to score five centuries in a single Test series, totalling 827 runs from 10 innings. He was dismissed for a duck only once in Tests, lbw to Ray Lindwall in the 1st Test against Australia at Brisbane in 1951.He played for Enfield in the Lancashire Leagues in 1951 to 1954, and moved to Georgetown in Guyana (then British Guiana) in 1954, to be the cricket coach for the British Guiana Sugar Producers' Association. He also played first-class cricket for British Guiana, and by 1956 he was captaining the side. In retirement, he returned to Barbados in 1970.He was a Wisden Cricketer of the Year in 1958.

Prior Erskine Waverley Jones (1991-1987) Test Cap No:57

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Full name Prior Erskine Waverley Jones
Born June 6, 1917, Princes Town, Trinidad
Died November 21, 1991, Port of Spain, Trinidad (aged 74 years 168 days)
Major teams West Indies, Trinidad
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast

Profile
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Prior Jones was a useful medium-fast bowler who could move the ball both ways, but one who lost most of his 20s to the war years and then his 30s as a bit-part player to Ramadhin and Valentine. He made his Test debut in 1947-48 when he took 4 for 54 at Bridgetown, enjoyed a fairly successful tour of India the following winter, and he was expected to play a big part on the 1950 tour of England, but as it was he made only two appearances and did little more than take the shine off the ball in either. His final Test came in Australia in 1951-52. He was a dogged tailender and an excellent fielder.

Test debut West Indies v England at Bridgetown, Jan 21-26, 1948
Last Test Australia v West Indies at Sydney, Nov 30-Dec 5, 1951
First-class span 1940-1951