Wednesday, January 4

Azmat Rana (1951-2015) Test Cap No:85

© dunyanews.tv
Full name Azmat Rana
Born November 3, 1951, Lahore, Punjab
Died May 30, 2015(63 years 208 days)
Major teams Pakistan, Bahawalpur, Muslim Commercial Bank, Pakistan International Airlines, Punjab
Batting style Left-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm offbreak
Relation Brother - Shakoor Rana, Brother - Shafqat Rana, Brother - Sultan Rana, Nephew - Mansoor Rana, Nephew - Maqsood Rana

Profile
The younger brother of Test cricketer Shafqat Rana and umpire Shakoor Rana, Azmat was a consistent left-hand batsman who played with steady success in Pakistan domestic cricket. Like many others, he played just once for Pakistan. He was selected against Australia at Lahore in 1979-80 and scored 49 in his only innings. He could not make further inroads for selection into the Pakistan team due to the strong batting line-up but still continued to shine on the domestic front.

Only Test Pakistan v Australia at Lahore, Mar 18-23, 1980
ODI debut Pakistan v India at Sialkot, Oct 13, 1978
Last ODI Pakistan v India at Sahiwal, Nov 3, 1978
First-class 1969/70 - 1983/84
List A span 1973/74 - 1985/86

Taslim Arif Abbasi (1954-2008) Test Cap No:82

© en.wikipedia.org
Full name Taslim Arif Abbasi
Born May 1, 1954, Karachi, Sind
Died March 13, 2008, Karachi, Sind (aged 53 years 317 days)
Major teams Pakistan (Test: 1979/80-1980/81); Pakistan (ODI: 1980/81); Karachi Blues (1967/68-1972/73); Karachi Whites (1970/71); Sindh 1972/73-1973/74); Karachi (1972/73); National Bank of Pakistan (1973/74-1988/89); National Bank of Pakistan A (1975/76);
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium
Fielding position Wicketkeeper

Relations:Nephew: Mohammad Ali; Nephew: Wasim Arif

Profile
© Getty Images
Taslim Arif made his Pakistan debut as a batsman - when he ground out 90 and 46 against India at Calcutta in 1979-80 - but had the gloves for the rest of his Test career. In his third Test, against Australia the same winter,Taslim made a mighty seven-hour 210 not out, the highest score by a wicketkeeper in a Test Andy Flower made 232 not out in 2000-01. But with Wasim Bari a vastly superior gloveman, Taslim only played six Tests; he ended with a batting average of 62.62. He was a surprising signing for World Series Cricket's second season - uncapped and hardly a household name. Taslim died aged 53 from a lung infection.

Test debut India v Pakistan at Kolkata, Jan 29-Feb 3, 1980
Last Test Pakistan v West Indies at Faisalabad, Dec 8-12, 1980
ODI debut Pakistan v West Indies at Karachi, Nov 21, 1980
Last ODI Pakistan v West Indies at Lahore, Dec 19, 1980
First-class span 1967-1989

Shahid Israr (1950-2013) Test Cap No.73

© worldwidesportsmemorabilia.com
Full name Shahid Israr
Born March 1, 1950, Karachi, Sind
Died April 29, 2013, Karachi, Sind, Pakistan (aged 63 years 59 days)
Major teams Pakistan, Karachi, Sind
Batting style Right-hand bat
Fielding position Wicketkeeper

Profile
His Test career consisted of just one match as wicketkeeper against New Zealand at Karachi in
1976/77. Catches dropped by him and the rest of the team resulted in Pakistan squandering a
winning position, and he was not again considered. Although he batted at No. 11 in that game,
he was a better batsman than that. Although his first-class career spanned 11 seasons, he was
an infrequent player and only really took part in three full campaigns.Shahid Israr, a former Pakistan wicketkeeper, has died in Karachi at the age of 63.

PCB management is deeply saddened by the loss of Mr Shahid Israr and thoughts and prayers
are with his family at this time of sorrow," the Pakistan board said.Israr played one Test for Pakistan, against New Zealand in Karachi in October 1976, and kept
wicket in that game. He also played 31 first-class matches, scoring 868 runs at an average of
28. He took 66 catches and made 22 stumpings. His first-class career spanned 11 years, from
1968 to 1979.

Only Test Pakistan v New Zealand at Karachi, Oct 30-Nov 4, 1976
First-class span 1968-1979
List A span 1975-1978

Wasim Hassan Raja (1952-2006) Test Cap No:67

© ESPNcricinfo Ltd
Full name Wasim Hassan Raja
Born July 3, 1952, Multan, Punjab
Died August 23, 2006, Marlow, Buckinghamshire (aged 54 years 51 days)
Major teams:Pakistan (Test: 1972/73-1984/85); Pakistan (ODI: 1972/73-1984/85); Lahore Greens (1967/68-1973/74); Lahore (1968/69); Sargodha (1969/70); Punjab University (1969/70-1971/72); Lahore A (1969/70); Pakistan Universities (1972/73); PIA A (1973/74); National Bank of Pakistan (1974/75-1987/88); National Bank of Pakistan A (1975/76); Lahore City Blues (1984/85); Lahore City Whites (1985/86); National Bank of Pakistan (1974/75-1982/83); Durham (1979-1987); Lahore City Whites (1985/86); 
Batting style Left-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak googly
Relation: Brother: Rameez Raja; Brother: Zaeem Raja; Cousin: Atif Rauf; Father: Saleem Akhtar; Son: AW Raja

Profile,
posterize image / © ESPNcricinfo Ltd
© getty image
Wasim Raja was a glorious lefthanded strokemaker, who revelled in adversity, a useful legspinner,who also opened the bowling for Pakistan on occasions, and an outstanding, lithe cover fieldsman. He represented Pakistan in more than 100 international matches, coached the national side for a short while and had a spell as an ICC match referee, being in charge of the last Ashes series in Australia. He will always be remembered for the style and spirit in which he played the game, yet for such a mild-mannered and charming man he had his fair share of clashes with the Pakistan board. From a privileged background, he did not enjoy the hierarchy within the side, once refusing to hang out a senior player's socks to dry, but more importantly he always felt frustrated that he seemed to be picked on a match-by-match basis while a clique of senior players were omnipresent in the team. But for this, he might have captained Pakistan ahead of the more rumbustious Javed Miandad or diffident Zaheer Abbas. After all, as a batsman he was a prodigy at 18 and led the under-19 side. Quite often then

Niaz Ahmed Siddiqi (1945-200) Test Cap No:55

Full name Niaz Ahmed Siddiqi
Born November 11, 1945, Benares (now Varanasi), Uttar Pradesh, India
Died April 12, 2000, Karachi, Sindh (aged 54 years 153 days)
Major teams Pakistan (Test: 1967-1968/69); Dacca (1965/66); Public Works Department (1965/66-1973/74); East Pakistan (1967/68-1968/69); Pakistan Railways B (1970/71);
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast-medium
Relations:Brother: Riaz Ahmed

Profile 
Niaz Ahmed Siddiqi (November 11, 1945, Benares, India – April 12, 2000, Karachi, Sindh) was a Pakistani cricketer who played in two Tests in 1967 and 1969. He was the only East Pakistani to play Test cricket for Pakistan.Ahmed was born in Benares, and his family moved to Dacca in East Pakistan after Partition.A fast-medium bowler and tailend batsman, he made his first-class debut for Dacca in March 1966 against Karachi Whites in the Quaid-e-Azam Trophy, taking three catches and three wickets in the first innings.

Mufasir-ul-Haq (1944-1983) Test Cap No:51

© pakpassion.net
Full name Mufasir-ul-Haq
Born August 16, 1944, Karnal, India
Died July 27, 1983, Karachi (aged 38 years 345 days)
Major teams Pakistan (Test: 1964/65); Karachi (1960/61-1968/69); Karachi Whites (1961/62-1969/70); Karachi B (1962/63); Karachi Blues (1963/64); Dacca (1965/66);Public Works Department (1965/66-1967/68); East Pakistan (1966/67-1967/68);National Bank of Pakistan (1969/70-1973/74); National Bank of Pakistan B (1975/76);
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Left-arm fast-medium
Other Umpire, Administrator

Profile
Mufasir-ul-Haq, who died in Karachi on July 27, 1983, aged 38, played his one Test match, for Pakistan against New Zealand, at Christchurch in February 1965, taking three wickets and scoring 8 not out. A left-arm medium-paced bowler, he played for Karachi, PWD and National Bank in first-class cricket. He was only the second Pakistani Test cricketer to die, the first being Amir Elahi.

Only Test New Zealand v Pakistan at Christchurch, Feb 12-16, 1965
First-class span 1960-1976

Arif Butt (1944-2007) Test Cap No:47

© archives.dailytimes.com
Full name Arif Butt
Born May 17, 1944, Lahore, Punjab
Died July 11, 2007, Lahore (aged 63 years 55 days)
Major teams Pakistan (Test: 1964/65); Lahore (1960/61); Lahore A (1961/62); Pakistan Railways (1962/63-1977/78); Pakistan Railways Reds (1965/66-1966/67); Pakistan Railways A (1970/71); Pakistan Railways (1974/75);
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast-medium

Profile
Arif Butt played only three Tests for Pakistan, though many felt he should've played many more, especially after one of the most impressive Pakistan debut Test performances. As a tall, lanky 19-year-old, Butt took 6 for 89 on his first appearance against Australia in a one-off Test at the MCG in 1964-65. He was a handy lower-order batsman as well, as a first-class career average of 29, four hundreds and over 4000 runs testifies. In what proved to be his last Test, he made his highest Test score of 20, helping Intikhab Alam add 52 valuable runs for the ninth wicket in a low-scoring, tense draw. It was primarily for his bowling, however, that he was known, possessing a good bouncer and an acclaimed leg-cutter. Along with his height and stamina, those traits enabled him to pick up 14 wickets in his first two Tests, including six wickets in his second Test against New Zealand. To many people's surprise he never played for Pakistan again after that tour down under, more so because Pakistan were struggling to find a decent new-ball pair at the time.

It was often suggested that his poor fielding skills and his temperament went against him. The snub didn't prevent an accomplished first-class career. His maiden first class century came in a losing cause against Karachi in the 1966-67 Quaid-e-Azam trophy final but his greatest season came seven years later, when, as captain, he led his side to the Patrons Trophy and the Quaid-e-Azam trophy, often opening the batting and the bowling. He took 6 for 55 against Sindh in the Quaid final and ended the season with 718 runs (including a career-best 180 as opener) and 48 wickets from 12 matches. Though he played on till 1977-78, the early 70s remain his best first-class years.

Test debut Australia v Pakistan at Melbourne, Dec 4-8, 1964
Last Test New Zealand v Pakistan at Auckland, Jan 29-Feb 2, 1965
First-class span 1960-1978

Abdul Kadir (1944-2002) Test Cap No:41

© en.wikipedia.org
Full name Abdul Kadir
Born May 10, 1944, Karachi, Sind
Died March 12, 2002, Karachi, Sind (aged 57 years 306 days)
Major teams Pakistan (Test: 1964/65); Karachi Whites (1961/62-1969/70); Karachi A (1962/63); Karachi Blues (1967/68); Karachi (1968/69); National Bank of Pakistan (1969/70-1971/72);
Batting style Right-hand bat
Fielding position Wicketkeeper

Profile
Abdul Kadir, who died in Karachi on March 12, 2002, aged 57, was a Test wicketkeeper who took no catches but made his mark with the bat. One of six new players picked by Pakistan for the one-off Test against Australia at Karachi in October 1964, the 20-year-old Kadir combined with his fellow-debutant "Billy" Ibadulla to add 249, the best at the time for any Pakistan wicket and a first-wicket record until 1997-98. Ibadulla made 166, Kadir was run out for 95. His stumping of Tom Veivers two days later would remain his only Test dismissal. When the sides met again at Melbourne five weeks later, Kadir's thumb was broken as he edged Graham McKenzie to slip in the first over. In the second innings he batted at No. 7 and made 35 in a 46-run stand with his captain,

Javed Akhtar (1940-2016) Test Cap No: 39

Full name Javed Akhtar
Born November 21, 1940, Delhi, India
Died July 8, 2016, Rawalpindi (aged 75 years 230 days)
Major teams Pakistan, Rawalpindi, Services
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm offbreak
Other Umpire

Profile
Javed Akhtar was a Pakistani cricketer who played in one Test in 1962.An off spinner, he had success at first-class level, taking his wickets at an average of 18.17, but struggled in his only Test, failing to take a wicket.He later became an umpire, standing in 18 Tests and 40 ODIs from 1980 to 1999.A tall and stocky offpsinner, Javed Akhtar's one Test appearance came as a 21-year-old after a long flight from Pakistan as a replacement
for Haseeb Ahsan. It was not a match to remember as he went wicketless and Pakistan lost by an innings. He went on to become a leading umpire, but his career ended under a cloud when at Headingley in 1998 he was accused of favouring England when he gave eight dubious decisions in England's favour in the series decider. At the King Commission in 2000 he was accused by Ali Bacher of inappropriate behaviour in that match, claims that Akhtar vigorously denied, and no charges were ever brought against him. Bacher later refused to appear in court in Pakistan to answer charges of libel brought against him by Akhtar.

Only Test England v Pakistan at Leeds, Jul 5-7, 1962
First-class span 1959/60 - 1975/76

Afaq Hussain (1939-2002) Test Cap No:38

Full name Afaq Hussain
Born December 31, 1939, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India
Died February 25, 2002, Karachi, Sind (aged 62 years 56 days)
Major teams Pakistan (Test: 1961/62-1964/65); Karachi B (1957/58); Pakistan Universities (1959/60); Karachi University (1959/60-1960/61); Karachi Whites (1961/62); Karachi (1961/62-1962/63); Karachi A (1962/63); Karachi Blues (1963/64); PIA(1964-1973/74); Public Works Department (1967/68); PIA A (1969/70-1971/72);
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm offbreak

Profile
Afaq Hussain died in Karachi on February 25, 2002, aged 62. A glance at his firstclass record suggests that this quickish off-spinner might have played more than two Tests. In 67 games between 1957-58 and 1973-74, he took ten wickets in a match five times. However, competition was fierce among the twirly merchants at a time when Pakistan's faster bowlers were beginning to carry an equal share of the workload. In England in 1962 Afaq went weeks without a game, playing six first-class matches out of 29 and taking only 13 wickets at 43.61, and in Australia and New Zealand in 1964- 65 he played only five games out of 14 - though one was the Test at Melbourne, where he failed to take a wicket. In fact,

Munir Malik (1934-2012) Test Cap # 35

© Pakistan Cricket Board
Full name Munir Malik
Born July 10, 1934, Leiah, Punjab
Died November 30, 2012 (aged 78 years 143 days)
Major teams Pakistan, Karachi, Punjab, Rawalpindi, Services (Pakistan)
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast-medium

Profile
Munir Malik was a Pakistani cricketer who played three Tests for Pakistan between 1959 and 1962. A Right-arm fast-medium bowler, he took nine wickets in Test cricket at an average of 39.77, including a five-wicket haul against England.During his first-class career, he took 197 wickets at the average of 21.75.

Haseeb Ahsan (1939-2013) Teast Cap No.25

© Pakistan Cricket Board
Full name Haseeb Ahsan
Born July 15, 1939, Peshawar, North-West Frontier Province (now PKP)
Died March 8, 2013, Karachi (aged 73 years 236 days)
Major teams Pakistan, Karachi, Pakistan International Airlines, Peshawar Cricket Association
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm offbreak

Profile
© PA Photo
Haseeb Ahsan was a Pakistani cricketer who played 12 Tests for Pakistan between 1958 and 1962. He was born in Peshawar, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. A right-arm off spinner, he took 27 wickets in Test cricket at an average of 49.25, including 2 five-wicket hauls. During his first-class career, he played 49 matches and took 142 wickets at the average of 27.71.Former Pakistan cricketer Waqar Hasan said about him that he "was a fighter to the core and served Pakistan cricket with honour and dignity.He worked as chief selector, team manager of Pakistan, and member of the 1987 Cricket World Cup organising committee. He died in Karachi on 8 March 2013, aged 73.

Gul Mohammad (1921-1992) Test Cap No:24

© ESPNcricinfo Ltd
Full name Gul Mohammad
Born October 15, 1921, Lahore, Punjab
Died May 8, 1992, Lahore, Punjab (aged 70 years 206 days)
Major teams:India (Test: 1946-1952/53); Pakistan (Test: 1956/57); Northern India (1938/39-1943/44); Muslims (1938/39-1944/45); Baroda (1943/44-1950/51); Hyderabad (India) (1951/52-1954/55); Lahore (1958/59);
Batting style Left-hand bat
Bowling style Left-arm medium
Relations:Son: Firdaus Gul

© ESPNcricinfo Ltd
Profile
Gul Mahomed was one of the small band of cricketers who have represented two countries in Tests. He played eight times for India and once for Pakistan. He was born in Lahore and died there on May 8,1992, aged 70, after a long illness. Gul Mahomed was a diminutive, dashing left-handed batsman who could bowl steady left-arm seamers at medium pace. Above all, he was an outstandingly brilliant fielderin the cover area; he could gather left-handed and return at great speed at a time when Indian fielding was often very unathletic. It was once said that a fish could not slither out of his hands. As a youth, heplayed for Islamia College, the nursery of many Test cricketers from Punjab, and made his début in theRanji Trophy in 1938-39 for Northern India when he was 17. He soon announced his class by hitting 95for Muslims against Hindus in the Northern India Triangular Tournament. He made real progress in 1942and scored a forceful hundred for the Rest of India against Western India, facing an attack of Teststandard. Meanwhile, the Bombay Pentangular Tournament had provided him with the chance of makingtwo more hundreds and he and Hazare - batsmen of contrasting styles - shared a stand of 302 for aBengal Cyclone XI against a Bijapur Famine XI in the Brabourne Stadium in Bombay. This was aforetaste of what came later.

The 1946 Indian touring squad © Wisden Cricket Monthly
Gul Mahomed did well enough in trials to secure a place on the trip to England in 1946 but, in an interview many years later, he was sharply critical of the Nawab of Pataudi's captaincy, maintaining that no one apart from Merchant was given a proper chance to run into consistent form. He played without success at Lord's in the First Test. Back in India, however, he and Hazare shared what remains the largest stand for any wicket in first-class cricket. It was in the final of the Ranji Trophy between Baroda and Holkar. Gul Mahomed came in with the score at 91 for three. When he was out for 319, eight hours 53 minutes later, they had put on 577 for the fourth wicket, part of a total of 784.
Gul was a member of the post-Independence team which toured Australia as pioneers in 1947-48,captained by Lala Amarnath. The team failed dismally and he made only 130 runs in five Tests but fielded brilliantly throughout. He represented India against the newcomers Pakistan in their first two Tests in 1952-53. But he then migrated to Pakistan and in 1956-57 he was chosen for his new country against Ian Johnson's Australians at Karachi, and made the winning hit. Earlier, he had been a greatsuccess as a professional in the Lancashire League with Ramsbottom.

Test debut England v India at Lord's, Jun 22-25, 1946
Last Test Pakistan v Australia at Karachi, Oct 11-17,
First-class span 1938-1959

Wallis Mathias (1935-1994) Test Cap No:23

© ESPNcricinfo Ltd
Full name Wallis Mathias
Born February 4, 1935, Karachi, Sindh
Died September 1, 1994, Karachi, Sindh (aged 59 years 209 days)
Major teams:Pakistan (Test: 1955/56-1962); Sindh (1953/54-1973/74); Karachi Blues (1956/57-1967/68); Karachi A (1957/58-1962/63); Karachi (1958/59-1968/69); Karachi Whites (1961/62-1969/70); National Bank of Pakistan (1969/70-1976/77); National Bank of Pakistan A (1975/76);
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium

Profile
Wallis Mathias, who died on September 1, 1994, after a brain haemorrhage, aged 59, was the first non-Muslim to play for Pakistan. He made his debut in November 1955 as a 20-year-old and played in 21 Tests over the next seven years. His greatest merit was his fielding; he was the safe pair of hands in the slips that Pakistan's strong medium-pace attack of that era desperately wanted. He had exceptional reflexes and, though he took some spectacular catches, his great skill was to make hard chances look simple. He was also a middle-order batsman whose figures did not do justice to the usefulness of his runs:he scored 783 runs in Tests at 23.72, but regularly played critical little innings. The 64 and 45 he scored in Pakistan's win over West Indies at Dacca in 1958-59 made him easily the most successful batsman in a low-scoring game; a year earlier he had scored 73 and 77 in successive Tests in the Caribbean.

He played three Tests in England in 1962, but the following year he suffered a finger injury in the nets which left him with a slight deformity that restricted his brilliant catching.He continued in domestic cricket and scored 278 not out for Karachi Blues against Railway Greens in 1965-66. In 1969-70 he became National Bank's first captain and played on until 1975-76 before becoming coach, selector and manager. In 146 first-class matches he made 7,520 runs, average 44.49, including 16 centuries. He held 130 catches, 22 in Tests. He was a popular captain and a much respected man.

Test debut Pakistan v New Zealand at Dhaka, Nov 7-12, 1955
Last Test England v Pakistan at The Oval, Aug 16-20, 1962
First-class span 1953-1977

Agha Saadat Ali (1929-1995) Test Cap No:22

© ESPNcricinfo Ltd
Full name Agha Saadat Ali
Born June 21, 1929, Lahore, Punjab
Died October 25, 1995, Lahore, Punjab (aged 66 years 126 days)
Major teams Pakistan (Test: 1955/56); Pakistan Universities (1949/50); Bahawalpur (1953/54); Lahore B (1961/62);
Batting style Right-hand bat

Profile
Agha Saadat Ali died in his native Lahore on October 25 from carcinomatosis aged 66. He played one Test for Pakistan. Recognised as possessing a talent comparable to Imtiaz Ahmed, Khan Mohammad and Parsi cricketer Rusi Dinshaw, he was sent in the first batch to the Alf Gover school for coaching in what became a forerunner to the many Pakistan Eaglet tours of England. Unfortunately he did not develop as expected. Nevertheless his brilliant fielding against the New Zealand touring team of 1955-56 at Karachi, where he played as twelfth man, led to his inclusion in the following Test at Dhaka where he scored 8 not out and held three catches. Opportunities for first-class cricket were rare in the early days of Pakistan cricket. Appearances against the touring West Indians in 1948 and a Commonwealth team in 1949 did not count as first-class. Between 1950 when he made his first-class debut for Pakistan Universities against Ceylon, until 1961/62 when he captained Lahore `B', Agha Saadat played only 16 matches, scoring 325 runs at an average of 14.13. He also took one wicket and held eight catches. After retirement he became a coach at the national level. His growing status within the game was reflected in his position as Assistant Secretary of the BCCP which he held for some time. Both of his sons played first-class cricket.Agha Saadat also served as President of the Billiard and Snooker Association of Lahore.

Only Test Pakistan v New Zealand at Dhaka, Nov 7-12, 1955
First-class span 1949-1962

Malik Miran Bakhsh (1907-1991) Test Cap No:21

© ESPNcricinfo Ltd
Full name Malik Miran Bakhsh
Born April 20, 1907, Rawalpindi
Died February 8, 1991, Dhok Rata, Rawalpindi (aged 83 years 294 days)
Major teams Pakistan (Test:1954/55); Pakistan Combined Services (1954/55-1956/57); Punjab B (1957/58); Rawalpindi (1958/59);
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm offbreak

Profile
Pakistan offspinner Miran Bux's main claim to fame is that he was the second-oldest debutant in Test history. He was 47 years 275 days when, in his last season of first-class cricket in 1954-55, he was called up against India at Lahore. It was a short-lived experiment - he took only two wickets in his twoTests - but Miran did at least end with a first-class bowling average of 19.

Test debut Pakistan v India at Lahore, Jan 29-Feb 1, 1955
Last Test Pakistan v India at Peshawar, Feb 13-16, 1955
First-class span 1949-1959

Aslam Khokhar (1920-2011) Test Cap No:20

© ESPNcricinfo Ltd
Full name Mohammad Aslam Khokhar
Born January 5, 1920, Lahore, Punjab
Died January 22, 2011, Lahore (aged 91 years 17 days)
Major teams Pakistan (Test: 1954); Muslims (1938/39); Northern India (1941/42-1946/47); Pakistan Railways (1953/54-1963/64);
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak

Profile
Mohammad Aslam was a dashing strokeplayer, renowned for his electric fielding, and also occasionally bowled a mixture of mixture of leg-breaks and googlies. He toured England in 1954, and despite making 421 runs on the tour at 28.06 he struggled in his one Test, scoring 16 and 18 at Trent Bridge, and did not play for his country again. Though he played only one official Test, Aslam also took part in the first 'unofficial' Test Pakistan played before they gained Test status in 1952-53, against the touring West Indies in Lahore's Bagh-e-Jinnah in 1947-48. After retiring he took up umpiring, on the insistence of Pakistan's first - unofficial Test - captain Mian Mohammad Saeed and officiated in three Tests - all involving Pakistan and England - in 1973 and 1977. He took over as senior coach at Lahore's Aitchson College and worked at a national training camp in the mid-80s.

Khalid Hasan (1937-2013) Test Cap No.19

Full name Khalid Hasan
Born July 14, 1937, Peshawar, North-West Frontier Province
Died December 3, 2013, Lahore (aged 76 years 142 days)
Major teams Pakistan, Lahore, Punjab
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak googly

Profile
Aged just 16 years 352 days, Khalid Hassan made his Test debut for Pakistan against England at Trent Bridge. At the time Hassan was the youngest Test cricketer, but he has since been left behind by a series of younger men. Hassan does have one (unwanted) record: as a one-cap wonder, his last day of Test cricket came at the tender age of 16 years 356 days.

Only Test England v Pakistan at Nottingham, Jul 1-5, 1954
First-class span 1953-1959 

MEZ Ghazali (1924-2003) Test Cap No:18

© ESPNcricinfo Ltd
Full name Mohammad Ebrahim Zainuddin Ghazali
Born June 15, 1924, Bombay (now Mumbai), Maharashtra, India
Died April 26, 2003, Karachi, Pakistan (aged 78 years 315 days)
Major teams Pakistan (Test: 1954); Maharashtra (1942/43-1946/47); Muslims (1943/44-1945/46); Sindh (1947/48); Pakistan Combined Services (1953/54-1955/56);
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm offbreak

Profile
Ebbu Ghazali was an offspinning allrounder who played two Tests on Pakistan's first full tour of England, in 1954. He made 18 and 14 at Trent Bridge, but at Old Trafford bagged a pair inside two hours - the fastest in Test history. In all he scored 601 runs (28.61) and took 17 wickets (39.64) on that tour. He was also a member of the strong Pakistan Eaglets side which toured England the year before.

His highest first-class score was 160, for Services at Karachi in 1953-54, and his best bowling (5 for 28) came the following season against Punjab at Lahore. Mohammad Ebrahim Zainuddin Ghazali was born in Gujarat, played for Maharashtra before Partition from India, and served as an administrator after his retirement. He was manager of the Pakistan tour of Australia in 1972-73, by which time he was a wing commander in the Pakistan Air Force.

Test debut England v Pakistan at Nottingham, Jul 1-5, 1954
Last Test England v Pakistan at Manchester, Jul 22-27, 1954
First-class span 1942-1955

Shujauddin Butt (1930-2006) Test Cap No:17

© Pakistan Cricket Board
Full name Shujauddin Butt
Born April 10, 1930, Lahore, Punjab
Died February 7, 2006, London, England (aged 75 years 303 days)
Major teams (Test: 1954-1961/62); Northern India (1946/47); Punjab University (1947/48-1951/52); Pakistan Combined Services ( 1953/54-1963/64); Bahawalpur (1957/58-1969/70); Rawalpindi (1965/66);
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Slow left-arm orthodox

Profile
Shujauddin Butt played 19 Tests between 1954 and 1962 and also served as a national selector. He took 20 wickets with his left-arm spin and also scored 395 runs. In 101 first-class games, he took 319 wickets and scored 3,490 runs. A colonel in the army, he was a prisoner of war during the 1971 India-Pakistan conflict. A gentle and down-to-earth person, Butt was born in Lahore in 1930 and represented Northern Punjab, Services, Bahawalpur, Rawalpindi and Punjab University

Alimuddin (1930-2012) Test Cap # 15

©Pakistan Cricket Board
Full name Alimuddin
Born December 15, 1930, Ajmer, Rajasthan, India
Died July 12, 2012, Northwick Park Hospital, Harrow (aged 81 years 210 days)
Major teams Pakistan, Bahawalpur, Gujarat, Karachi, Muslims, Public Works Department, Rajputana, Sind
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak
Other Coach
Relation Brother - Azimuddin, Brother - Salimuddin, Nephew - J Uddin

Profile
Alimuddin & Hanif Mohammad come out to bat ,
Pakistanis v Indian Gymkhana Club,
May 4, 1954,© Getty Images
Own Signed Picture,
Alimuddin born December 15, 1930, Ajmer, British India is a former Pakistani cricketer who played in 25 Tests from 1954 to 1962. He was the leading batsman during the 1954-55 series with India and scored 103 at Karachi. During the disastrous 1962 tour to England, Alimuddin top-scored in both innings with 50 and 60 at the Leeds Test. In the early years he formed a stable opening pair with Hanif. In the Karachi Test of 1962 he hit a stroke-filled 109 against England. He was known for his solid technique and was a member of the team which England at The Oval in 1954.He is the youngest person to have played first-class cricket, appearing for Rajasthan in the Ranji Trophy at the age of just 12 years 73 days.

Alimuddin was a burley opening batsman who preferred attack to defence and an outstanding fielder. He made his mark at an early age, appearing for Rajasthan in the pre-partition Ranji Trophy when aged 12 year and 73 days, the youngest person to play in a first-class match. He top-scored in his first innings, albeit with 13, and then was second top score in the second innings with 27. Eleven years later, on Pakistan's first tour of England in 1954, he started with a hundred at Worcester and a second one against Cambridge but his form fell away and in three Tests he managed only 51 runs.

He bounced back to be the best batsman on either side in Pakistan's first home series, against India in 1954-55, but he rarely found his best form thereafter, losing his place in the West Indies, but hitting back with a Test-best 109 and 53 against England at Karachi in 1961-62. After captaining Karachi B, he became the national coach before moving to London to work for Pakistan International Airlines. 

Test debut England v Pakistan at Lord's, Jun 10-15, 1954
Last Test England v Pakistan at Nottingham, Jul 26-31, 1962
First-class span 1942-1968

Zulfiqar Ahmed (1926-2008) Test Cap No:13

© ESPNcricinfo Ltd
Full name Zulfiqar Ahmed
Born November 22, 1926, Lahore, Punjab
Died October 3, 2008, Combined Military Hospital, Lahore (aged 81 years 316 days)
Major teams  (Test: 1952/53-1956/57); Punjab University (1947/48); Bahawalpur (1953/54-1959/60); PIA (1964/65);
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm offbreak

Profile
Zulfiqar Ahmed, an offspinner and a useful lower-order batsman, was part of Pakistan's first Test squad for the tour of India in 1952-53. He made his debut in Lucknow and was part of Pakistan's tour to England in 1954 and the home series against New Zealand and Australia in 1955-56 and 1956-57 respectively. He played nine Tests in all and scored 200 runs and took 20 wickets. He scored a crucial 34 at No.10 to help set a competitive target in Pakistan's first victory at The Oval.

The highlight of his career, however, was the Karachi Test against New Zealand in 1955 in which Ahmed took 11 for 79. In the next Test in Lahore, Ahmed was part of Pakistan's tail which added a record 450 runs for the last four wickets. Pakistan were struggling at 111 for 6 and finished with 561. Ahmed began his innings with his team on 482 for 8 and remained unbeaten on 21. He died of cardiac arrest in Lahore at the age of 81. He was Pakistan's second-oldest cricketer, after Mohammad Aslam, at the time of his death.

Test debut India v Pakistan at Lucknow, Oct 23-26, 1952
Last Test Pakistan v Australia at Karachi, Oct 11-17, 1956
First-class span 1947-1965

Mahmood Hussain (1932-1991) Test Cap No:12

© ESPNcricinfo Ltd
Full name Mahmood Hussain
Born April 2, 1932, Lahore, Punjab
Died December 25, 1991, Northwick Park, Middlesex, England (aged 59 years 267 days)
Major teams,Pakistan (Test: 1952/53-1962); Pakistan Universities (1949/50); Punjab University (1950/51-1951/52); Karachi (1953/54-1961/62); East Pakistan (1955/56); Karachi Whites (1956/57-1961/62); Karachi A (1957/58);
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast-medium

Profile
© cricket.mohankumars.com
Mahmood Hussain, one of the stalwarts of Pakistan's early cricket, who took 60 wickets in 29 Test matches, died at Northwick Park Hospital at the age of 59, having been admitted there in September for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Known as a 'great fighter' during his playing days, he maintained his spirit to the end, in his battle with the dreaded complications of diabetes.

Mahmood was the fastest of a trio of new ball bowlers around whom Pakistan's attack was built in the 1950s. Fazal Mahmood, Khan Mohammed and Mahmood Hussain were all born in Lahore and did their city proud as they helped Pakistan to one famous victory after another in their early days. The first of these came on the inaugural tour of India in the Second Test at Lucknow in 1952-53. Mahmood was brought into the side as a result of injury to Khan and took four wickets on his debut, including three for 35 in the first innings (off 23 overs). The second of these victories and in many ways their greatest came at The Oval against England in 1954 with Mahmood taking five wickets in the match including four for 58 in the first innings. He missed the series against Australia in 1956 because of commitments to studies and business, but in 1958-59 when Pakistan beat the touring West Indies 2-1, he took five wickets in the second Test of the series at Dacca, including four for 48 in the second innings.

For much of his career Mahmood was overbowled, particularly on the featherbeds encountered on the sub-continent and the Caribbean at the time. As a result he often broke down with injuries but he was always a great trier to the last. When other heads went down, Mahmood was still available to give it one more try for captain and country. After an unsuccessful tour of England in 1962 Mahmood faded but he made one more appearance in England as manager of the 1978 Pakistan team. By now he had become a successful businessman spending summers at his Wembley home and winters in Pakistan.Mahmood will be remembered as the gentle giant with a great sense of humour and a fighter to the last. A larger than life figure, he will be counted amongst those who were pioneers of Pakistan cricket.

Test debut India v Pakistan at Lucknow, Oct 23-26, 1952
Last Test England v Pakistan at Leeds, Jul 5-7, 1962
First-class span 1949-1969

Nazar Muhammad (1921-1996) Test Cap No:10

© ESPNcricinfo Ltd
Full name Nazar Mohammad
Born March 5, 1921, Lahore, Punjab
Died July 12, 1996, Lahore, Punjab (aged 75 years 129 days)
Major teams:Pakistan (Test: 1952/53); Northern India (1940/41-1946/47); Muslims (1940/41-1944/45); Punjab University (1947/48);
 Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm bowler
Relations:Brother: Mohammad Sharif; Nephew: Azmat Hussain; Son: Mudassar Nazar; Son: Mubashir Nazar

Profile
nazar muhammad son 
MUDASSAR NAZAR
© ESPNcricinfo Ltd
Nazar Mohammad, who died on July 12, 1996, aged 75, faced the first ball received by a Pakistani in Test cricket, at Delhi in 1952-53, and in the next match became the country's first Test centurion. On a matting wicket at Lucknow, he carried his bat for 124 not out in eight hours 35 minutes and set up an innings victory; he was the first player to be on the field throughout a Test. He also made 55 and 47 in the final Test but, soon afterwards, a domestic accident damaged his arm and ended his career. He became a coach, selector and one of Pakistan's best cricketing raconteurs. His son, Mudassar Nazar, played 76 Tests from pakistan.

Test debut India v Pakistan at Delhi, Oct 16-18, 1952
Last Test India v Pakistan at Kolkata, Dec 12-15, 1952
First-class span 1940-1953

Maqsood Ahmed (1925-1999) Test Cap No:9

The Pakistan squad for the Trent Bridge Test of 1954 maqsood ahmed part of that team © Getty Images
Full name Maqsood Ahmed
Born March 26, 1925, Amritsar, Punjab, India
Died January 4, 1999, Rawalpindi, Punjab (aged 73 years 284 day
Major teams:Pakistan (Test: 1952/53-1955/56); Southern Punjab (1944/45-1946/47); Punjab University ( 1947/48); Bahawalpur (1953/54); Karachi Blues (1956/57); Sindh B ( 1957/58); Rawalpindi (1962/63-1963/64);  
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium
maqsood ahmed in england tour 1954
Profile
 ESPNcricinfo Ltd©
Maqsood Ahmed, who died on January 4, 1999, aged 73, was one of the handful of cricketers to score 99 in a Test without ever reaching a century. The near-miss happened in the Lahore Test between Pakistan and India in 1954-55 when Maqsood was stumped. It was an appropriate conclusion, since he was the most carefree and aggressive batsman Pakistan had in their early years of Test cricket. He played in their first 16 Tests, and hoisted the banner of Pakistani batting from the very start. Maqsood had begun his career, before Pakistan's foundation, with 144 on his first-class debut, for Southern Punjab against Northern India at Lahore in 1944-45. He pressed the case for the new nation's elevation to Test status by scoring 137 not out against MCC on their 1951-52 tour. And on the opening day of first-class cricket by a Pakistani team in England, in 1954, he hit a thrilling 111 in two and a quarter hours at Worcester. In Tests, his approach was successful only spasmodically, but he enlivened the closing stages of Pakistan's hefty defeat at Trent Bridge with a rousing 69, getting out trying to hit a second successive six off Bob Appleyard. The press called him Merry Max. His success at Worcester helped him get work as a club professional in the area. He became chairman of Pakistan's selectors, in 1981-82, and a successful commentator and journalist: he was the first sports editor of The News, Rawalpindi

Test debut India v Pakistan at Delhi, Oct 16-18, 1952
Last Test Pakistan v New Zealand at Lahore, Oct 26-31, 1955
First-class span 1944-1964

Khan Mohammad (1928-2009) Test Cap No:8

ESPNcricinfo.LTD By © Hashim Khan  
Full name Khan Mohammad
Born January 1, 1928, Lahore, Punjab
Died July 4, 2009, London, England (aged 81 years 184 days)
Major teams Pakistan (Test: 1952/53-1957/58); Northern India (1946/47); Punjab University (1947/48-1948/49); Pakistan Universities (1949/50); Somerset (1951); Bahawalpur ( 1953/54); Sindh (1955/56); Karachi Whites (1956/57); Lahore (1960/61);
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast-medium

Profile
With Presedent Mushraff To Recived Medal Of  Honour / ESPNcricinfo
The life story of Khan Mohammad is not much different from the first batch of Pakistan Test cricketers. Born on New years day 1928, he grew up in the old walled city (Kashmiri Gate) of Lahore. Son of a timber merchant, Jan Mohammad, Khan was the only among the four brothers to take up cricket. He recalls his introduction to the game at Central Model High School, Lahore. There was lot of encouragement to take up the game in that school. Once a week there used to be a thirty-minute period exclusively for cricket.

The teachers during this period discussed various aspects of the game, generally without going into technicalities. However Khan shot into fame through club cricket which at that time was at its climax. It was through the annual matches of his club that Khan came into limelight with impressive bowling performances. The competitive nature of cricket in the region helped him to develop his cricket ability at a very young age. It was Khan's combined ability to generate pace without losing control over his line and length and great stamina, that enhanced his reputation among the top-notch pace bowlers of his time. Having a big heart was another essential ingredient that served him well even in poor fielding sides.

Abdul Hafeez Kardar (1925-1996) Test Cap No:7

The Unforgettable Oval Test:kardar thanxs from gallery © getty image
Full name Abdul Hafeez Kardar
Born January 17, 1925, Lahore, Punjab
Died April 21, 1996, Islamabad, Punjab (aged 71 years 95 days)
Major teams India (Test: 1946); Pakistan (Test: 1952/53-1957/58); Northern India (1943/44-1944/45); Muslims (1944/45); Oxford University (1947-1949); Warwickshire (1948-1950); Pakistan Combined Services ( 1953/54-1954/55);
Batting style Left-hand bat
Bowling style Slow left-arm orthodox

Profile
©cricdude.com
Kardar, Abdul Hafeez, who died on April 21, 1996, aged 71, may be regarded as the father figure of Pakistani cricket and, as such, an important character in the history of the country as a whole. He captained Pakistan in their First Test match in 1952 and was at the forefront of events from then until he resigned from the Pakistani Board in 1977 in protest against Government interference. But he was a Test cricketer before Pakistan even existed, playing for India on the 1946 tour of England under the name Abdul Hafeez. After the tour he added the family name Kardar, stayed in England and went to Oxford to read PPE and enhance his reputation as an idiosyncratic and fearless cricketer: a left-handed batsman, whose response to any bowler or situation was to dance down the track first ball and slam it back over the bowler's head, and a left-arm medium-paced bowler, economical on a good pitch, devastatingly effective on a bad one. Kardar had a couple of productive seasons with Warwickshire, where his successes included marrying the club chairman's daughter, then returned to Pakistan to take on the captaincy.

Israr Ali (1927-2016) Test Cap No:6

Full name Israr Ali
Born May 1, 1927, Jullundur (now Jalandhar), Punjab, India
Died February 1, 2016, Okara, Pakistan (aged 88 years 276 days)
Major teams Pakistan, Bahawalpur, Multan, Southern Punjab
Batting style Left-hand bat
Bowling style Left-arm fast-medium

Profile
Israr Ali made his debut for Punjab in 1946-47 before partition, returning to Indian in 1952-53 as a member of the Pakistan side. He played two Test on that tour, but made little impression. As a left-hand batsman he was initially tried at the top of the order, and latterly lower down, with no success. As a fast-medium bowler, he on occasion opened for Pakistan. He was recalled for two more Tests, against Australia in 1959-60, taking five wickets but again failing with the bat.

Former Pakistan allrounder Israr Ali died in his hometown of Okara on February 1 at the age of 88. He was Pakistan's oldest living Test cricketer and had played four Tests for the country between 1952 and 1959.Ali played 40 first-class games, taking 114 wickets at 22.63 and scoring 1130 runs at 20.54. He had begun his career playing for Punjab in 1946-47 before Pakistan and India were partitioned, and then toured India as part of  the Pakistan Test side in 1952-53. He played only two Tests on that tour, and was then was recalled to the side for two Tests against Australia in 1959-60. While interacting with ESPNcricinfo in 2012,

Ali recalled how he had dismissed Australia opener Les Favell in all four innings without the assistance of fielders.He had said that one of his biggest regrets was a fallout with Pakistan captain Abdul Hafeez Kardar, which Ali believes shortened his international career.After his playing career, Ali stayed involved in cricket administration and was president of the Multan region from 1981 to 1982, and a member of Pakistan's selection committee in 1983 and 1984, before he decided to move away from the game. "I parted from cricket after 1987, maybe because I was losing the passion, and decided to stay back in Okara," Ali had said when he was 85 years old.Israr had been living a humble life in Okara, nearly 85 miles away from Lahore. The agricultural town has fertile land with fields of potato, tomato, sugarcane, wheat, rice and corn and in sports it is a significant nursery for hockey. Ali had been living a quiet life up until the time of his death.

Test debut India v Pakistan at Delhi, Oct 16-18, 1952
Last Test Pakistan v Australia at Lahore, Nov 21-26, 1959
First-class span 1946/47 - 1960/61

Imtiaz Ahmed (1928-2016) Test Cap No:5

Full name Imtiaz Ahmed
Born January 5, 1928, Lahore, Punjab
Died December 31, 2016, (aged 88 years 361 days)
Major teams Pakistan, Northern India, Pakistan Air Force, Punjab, Services
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm offbreak
Fielding position Wicketkeeper
Relation Brother - Iftikhar Ahmed

Profile
Imtiaz Ahmedwas a cricketer who played for the Pakistan's first Test team in 1952.Born in Lahore, Ahmed was educated at Islamia College. He played in 41 Tests and scored over 2000 runs. He was a middle order batsman who also sometimes batted in the top order. He was Pakistan's first Test wicketkeeper. He made the first Test double hundred by a wicketkeeper when he scored 209 against New Zealand in October 1955.On 6 March 1951, playing for India Prime Minister's XI against a Commonwealth XI, Ahmed scored a triple century (300 not out) while following on, a feat that has been achieved by only two others.He received Pride of Performance Award from the Government of Pakistan for sports in 1966.Ahmed also played in the Ranji Trophy.He died six days shy to his 89th birthday.

Imtiaz Ahmed was one of the fine, proud, patriotic band of cricketers, most of them Lahore College graduates, who gave Pakistan such a successful start in the 1950s. As a batsman he was a magnificent hooker: Majid Khan said he was inspired by the sight of Imtiaz taking on Wes Hall at Lahore in 1958-59. He was also Pakistan's first regular wicketkeeper, which often forced him to bat down the order when he was so suited to being an attacking opener. In England in 1954 he came closer than any tourist before or since to the wicketkeeper's double of 1000 runs and 100 dismissals in a first-class season - he finished 14 dismissals short.

Test debut India v Pakistan at Delhi, Oct 16-18, 1952
Last Test England v Pakistan at The Oval, Aug 16-20, 1962
First-class span 1944/45 - 1972/73

Hanif Mohammad (1934-2016) Test Cap No:4

© newsone.tv

Full name Hanif Mohammad
Born December 21, 1934, Junagadh, Gujarat, India
Died August 11, 2016, Karachi (aged 81 years 234 days)
Major teams Pakistan, Bahawalpur, Karachi, Pakistan International Airlines
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm offbreak
Fielding position Wicketkeeper
Relation Brother - Wazir Mohammad, Brother - Raees Mohammad, Brother - Mushtaq Mohammad, Brother - Sadiq Mohammad, Son - Shoaib Mohammad, Grandson - Shehzar Mohammad

Profile
© ESPNcricinfo Ltd
Hanif was the first star of Pakistan cricket, the "Little Master" who played the longest innings in Test history - his 970-minute 337 against West Indies in Bridgetown in 1957-58 - then followed it a year later with the highest first-class innings to that point, 499 run out. With such feats, broadcast on radio, he turned cricket in Pakistan from the preserve of the Lahore educated elite into the mass sport it is today. Although famous for his immaculate defence and never hitting the ball in the air, Hanif could also attack, and was probably the originator of the reverse-sweep. His versatility extended to captaining and keeping wicket, and bowling right- and left-handed in Test cricket. But in addition to being the jack of all trades, he was the master of one.

© Pakistan Cricket Board
 Hanif Mohammad played for the Pakistani cricket team in 55 Test matches between the 1952–53 season and the 1969–70 season. He averaged 43.98 scoring twelve centuries. At his peak, he was considered one of the best batsmen in the world despite playing at a time when there was very little Test cricket being played by Pakistan: just 55 Test matches in a career spanning 17 years. In his obituary by ESPNcricinfo, he was honoured as the original Little Master, a title later assumed by Sunny Gavaskar and Sachin Tendulkar.

© Getty Images
Hanif was trained by Abdul Aziz, an Afghan cricket player, who had earlier played in Ranji Trophy for Jamnagar and father of Indian cricketer, Salim Durani.The highest of Hanif's Test centuries was a famous 337 made against West Indies in a six-day test at Bridgetown in 1957/58. After Pakistan found itself following on from a first-innings deficit of 473 runs on the afternoon of the third day, Hanif spent more than sixteen hours at the crease compiling his runs, allowing Pakistan to draw the game.It remains the longest innings in Test history (and stood as the longest in all first-class cricket for over 40 years). It was the only Test match instance of a triple century in a team's second innings until it was equaled by New Zealand cricketer Brendon McCullum against India in 2014.Displays such as this earned him the nickname "Little Master".

Hanif son Shoaib Mohammad who also
played for pakistan cricket team
© sport360.com
In 1958/59, he surpassed Don Bradman's record for the highest individual first-class innings. Hanif made 499 for Karachi in a match against Bahawalpur before being run out attempting his five hundredth run; this mark stood for more than 35 years before being passed by Brian Lara in 1994. In all he made 55 first-class centuries and finished with a strong first-class career average of 52.32. He could bowl with either arm, and kept wicket on a number of occasions.He is known to have played the slowest test innings when he scored 20 off 223 balls at a strike rate of 8.968

Hanif's career lasted until 1975/76, but he never played in the English County Championship, although he did have an outing for the Northamptonshire Second XI in August 1965 whilst preparing for his appearance for a Rest of the World XI against England at the Scarborough Festival a few days later. Hanif was named as a Wisden Cricketer of the Year in 1968 and in January 2009 he was named along with two other Pakistani players, Imran Khan and Javed Miandad, among the inaugural batch of 55 inductees into the ICC's Hall of Fame.

In one Test match against Australia, Hanif scored a century in the first innings. In the second he was given out stumped by Barry Jarman off the bowling of Tom Veivers for 93. Hanif respected the umpire's decision. Later in a press conference Jarman admitted that Hanif was not out.

Test debut India v Pakistan at Delhi, Oct 16-18, 1952
Last Test Pakistan v New Zealand at Karachi, Oct 24-27, 1969
First-class span 1951/52 - 1975/76