Thursday, March 17

Brian William Luckhurst (1939-2005) Test Cap No:445

© The Cricketer International
Full name Brian William Luckhurst
Born February 5, 1939, Sittingbourne, Kent
Died March 1, 2005, Kent (aged 66 years 24 days)
Major teams England, Kent
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Slow left-arm orthodox

Profile
Brian Luckhurst sweeps,
© Getty Images
Brian Luckhurst shrewdly worked out what he could and could not do, and would have had an even better Test average if the selectors had assessed his ability as thoroughly. He was robbed of one tour he should have made - to India and Pakistan in 1972-73 - where his quick-footedness against spin and reliable close catching would have been invaluable, and chosen for one (Australia 1974-75) for which, aged 35, he was ill-suited. He was overwhelmed by Dennis Lillee and Jeff Thomson, and was never picked again. A well-built, square-shouldered figure always immaculately turned out, his most productive stroke was the square-cut, which he hit with crippling force, while his prime asset was unblinking concentration. He died in March 2005, aged 66, after suffering from cancer of the oesophagus.

In the late summer of 1953, two 14-year-old boys took the last bus from Sittingbourne to London and slept outside The Oval to make certain of seeing the final Test of the series between England and Lindsay Hassett's Australians. Seventeen years later, one of these cricket-mad boys, Brian William Luckhurst, returned to The Oval as one of England's opening batsmen against The Rest of the World. Alas! -- for Luckhurst and England -- the fates were in an unromantic mood and did not allow him even one celebratory run!Yet Luckhurst had done more than enough in the four previous Tests, and for Kent, the Champions, to ensure his place in the MCC party to tour Australia. He was one of the season's outstanding batsmen, and, as ever, a superb fielder in any position.Cricket has been Luckhurst's life. The Medway towns and Canterbury were within cycling distance to follow Kent, and, as a boy, he was particularly fascinated by Arthur Fagg and Leslie Todd, the openers of the day.

Michael Henry Denness (1940-2013) Teast Cap No.444

© telegraph.co.uk
Full name Michael Henry Denness
Born December 1, 1940, Bellshill, Lanarkshire, Scotland
Died April 19, 2013 (aged 72 years 139 days)
Major teams England, Scotland, Essex, Kent
Nickname Haggis
Batting style Right-hand bat
Other Referee
Height 5 ft 11 in
Education Ayr Academy

Profile
© telegraph.co.uk
Few contemporary batsmen were more stylish than Mike Denness at his peak, in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Tallish and slim, well-balanced, immaculately dressed on and off the field, possessed of a fine array of strokes and an excellent cover fieldsman to boot, Denness looked a model cricketer in every way. It was his misfortune that when those qualities won him the England captaincy, after Ray Illingworth's dismissal, he lacked the support of one of the players on whom he was most dependent. Geoff Boycott, who made no secret of how acutely he coveted the captaincy himself, played only the first six of Denness's 19 Tests as captain, which fatally holed England's prospects against Dennis Lillee and Jeff Thomson in Australia in 1974-75. Deposed when Australia won the first Test of 1975 at Edgbaston, Denness took his medicine with typical graciousness. He later became an ICC match referee but, at Port Elizabeth in 2001-02, his decision to sanction six Indian players, including Sachin Tendulkar, caused such a furore that the Indian and South African boards barred Denness from officiating in the next match, at Centurion. The ICC responded by withdrawing Test status from the game. He died in April 2013 after a battle with cancer during his final days as president of Kent.
© PA Photos

© commons.wikimedia.org
Michael Henry Denness OBE was a Scottish cricketer who played for England, Scotland, Essex and Kent. Scotland did not have a representative international team at the time of Denness' career, so he could only play for England at Test and ODI level. Denness was the second Scotsman to captain England, the first having been Douglas Jardine.[1] Denness later became an ICC match referee. He was one of the inaugural inductees into the Scottish Sports Hall of Fame and was a Wisden Cricketer of the Year in 1975. Denness died of cancer on 19 April 2013.

Denness was born in Bellshill, North Lanarkshire, Scotland.He captained England on nineteen occasions, winning six, losing five and drawing eight matches. He stepped down from the captaincy after the first Test of the 1975 series against Australia. Throughout his career, he suffered a lack of support from Geoffrey Boycott, which contributed to his downfall as a skipper – Boycott's absence costing England during matches against Australia.Once while in Australia, Denness received an envelope that had been sent with the address "Mike Denness, cricketer". The letter inside read, "Should this reach you, the post office clearly thinks more of your ability than I do.Denness played in twenty eight Tests overall, scoring 1,667 runs including four centuries. His best of 188 came against Australia on 8 February 1975.[6] His seven accompanying half-centuries helped to leave him with a Test batting average of 39.69. His ODI career was less successful, playing only 12 matches and scoring 264 runs at 29.33, with a best of 66.
© ESPNcricinfo Ltd
In domestic cricket, Denness played for both Essex and Kent between 1959 and 1980, making 501 appearances in first-class cricket and 232 more in one day matches. He scored over 30,000 domestic runs in all, including 33 first class hundreds and a best of 195; and six one day centuries with a top score of 188 not out. He also took two wickets with his occasional bowling.

In his capacity as an ICC match referee, Denness caused controversy after the Port Elizabeth Test between South Africa and the visiting Indians when he sanctioned six Indian players. At first, India refused to accept the sanctions and named the players for the following Test match. The International Cricket Council responded by stripping the game of Test match status. Soon after both the BCCI and ICC decided to establish a referee committee to verify Denness's conclusions. The match referee was heavily criticised for failing to explain his actions at a press conference, thus infuriating the Indian cricket establishment.[7] The BCCI later decided to forget the incident on humanitarian grounds, after Denness underwent heart surgery.In March 2002, Denness' role as a match referee came to an end, when the ICC failed to select him for their newly formed Elite Panel of Referees, although he had been put forward by the ECB as a candidate.He died at the age of 72 after a battle with cancer.A president of Kent County Cricket Club, Denness was appointed Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in the 2013 New Year Honours for services to sport.

Test debut England v New Zealand at The Oval, Aug 21-26, 1969
Last Test England v Australia at Birmingham, Jul 10-14, 1975
ODI debut England v West Indies at Leeds, Sep 5, 1973
Last ODI England v Australia at Leeds, Jun 18, 1975
First-class span 1959-1980
List A span 1963-1980

Basil Lewis D'Oliveira (1931-2011) Test Cap No:432

© Getty image
Full name Basil Lewis D'Oliveira
Born October 4, 1931, Signal Hill, Cape Town, Cape Province, South Africa
Died November 19, 2011, England (aged 80 years 46 days)
Major teams England, Worcestershire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium
Other Coach

Profile
© ESPNcricinfo Ltd
© PA Photos
One of broadcaster-writer John Arlott's most worthy deeds was saving Basil D'Oliveira from half-life as a Cape Colored in South Africa by persuading Middleton, the Central Lancashire League club, to take him on as their professional in 1960. This led to Worcestershire (in 1964) and England (in 1966) acquiring a readymade allrounder of formidable physical and mental strength, which was never better illustrated than when England were in trouble. Arlott's initiative was the making of D'Oliveira, and a source of joy to all who loathed apartheid. When you watched "Dolly" flaying the opposition's bowlers with meaty back-foot clumps, or frustrating their batsmen with outward-drifting medium-pace of cloying accuracy (his economy rate in Tests was 1.95 runs per over) there was one sharp regret ... if only he'd been spotted at 19 rather than 29. Then D'Oliveira would have put the runs and wickets in the book that would have shown future generations what he unmistakably was - one of cricket's greats.

© PA Photos
Basil D'Oliveira, the South Africa-born former England allrounder, died early on Saturday, aged 80, after a long battle with Parkinson's disease.In 1968, D'Oliveira, a Cape Coloured, was at the heart of one of cricket's greatest controversies, when the England tour of South Africa had to be called off since the government there refused to accept his presence in the visiting squad. The incident marked the beginning of South Africa's isolation from international cricket.

"Dolly", as he was affectionately called, couldn't establish a cricket career in South Africa due to the lack of opportunities for non-white players during the apartheid era. In 1960, the broadcaster and writer John Arlott persuaded him to move to England, where D'Oliveira initially played in the Lancashire leagues. .
Basil D'Oliveira is caught and,
bowled by Clive Lloyd for 110.
© Getty Images
He went on to play 44 Tests for England and made a name for himself as an allrounder, scoring 2484 runs at an average of 40, and picking up 47 wickets with his medium-pace bowling. His most famous Test innings was in the final Test of the 1968 Ashes, a 158 at The Oval that helped set up a thrilling series-levelling victory.

That innings came on the back of a summer of intense speculation over whether D'Oliveira would be picked for the South Africa series that followed the Ashes. South African politicians had made it abundantly clear that he would not be welcome due to his racial origins; despite the century at The Oval, D'Oliveira was left out of the England squad. He was later named as a replacement for the injured Tom Cartwright, a move that eventually caused the series to be cancelled. It was the cancellation of the series over D'Oliviera's selection which exposed the iniquities of South Africa's apartheid regime to the cricketing world.

Book On Basil D'Oliveira / Peter Oborne,
© Little, Brown
Gerald Majola, the CEO of Cricket South Africa, led the tributes to D'Oliveira. "He was a man of true dignity and a wonderful role model as somebody who overcame the most extreme prejudices and circumstances to take his rightful place on the world stage," Majola said. "One can only imagine what he might have achieved had he made his debut as he should have done at the age of 20 on South Africa's tour of England in 1951."
Former Worcestershire and England team-mate Tom Graveney paid tribute to his close friend on Sky Sports. "He was a very good allrounder," he said. "He bowled medium pace, with a few off-spinners in amongst them. But his batting was the thing. He was tremendously strong. I can remember batting with him when the pitches were turning a bit because we played on wet wickets in those days and he was just terrific.D'Oliveira had a lengthy career with Worcestershire, playing for them between 1964 and 1980, before taking over as the county's coach for a decade. In all first-class matches he scored 19,490 runs at 40.26 and took 551 wickets at 27.45. His son, Damian, also turned out for Worcestershire, representing them between 1982 and 1995.

Test debut England v West Indies at Lord's, Jun 16-21, 1966
Last Test England v Australia at The Oval, Aug 10-16, 1972
ODI debut Australia v England at Melbourne, Jan 5, 1971
Last ODI England v Australia at Birmingham, Aug 28, 1972
First-class span 1964-1980

Colin Milburn (1941-1990) Test Cap No:431

© Getty image
Full name Colin Milburn
Born October 23, 1941, Burnopfield, Co Durham
Died February 28, 1990, Aycliffe Village, Co Durham (aged 48 years 128 days)
Major teams England, Northamptonshire, Western Australia
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium

Profile
Fred Trueman, Basil D'Oliveira, Garry Sobers and Colin Milburn,
at Heathrow as they leave to take part in the Doubles Wicket contest,
in Australia © PA Photos 
There's no way of telling what difference it made to England's batting potential when Colin Milburn lost his left eye in a car accident and abruptly ended his brief Test career. England were well-stocked with opening batsmen at the end of the 1960s and, wonderful natural player as he was, Milburn would have had to score consistently heavily for Northants to become an automatic choice. What can be said with total certainty, however, is that that fateful car smash cost cricket one of its ripest characters of any generation - an 18-stone Durham lad with a smile for everyone and a drink with not a few - and spectators hours of joyous entertainment. "Ollie" - after the rotund American comedian Oliver Hardy - was far from just a hitter. In defence his head was still and his bat straight; and his off-side strokes, from either foot, were sweetly timed. But from long leg to long-on, whether hooking or pull-driving, he gave the ball such a mighty wallop that many times it was never seen again. A brief comeback with Northants found him sadly diminished.

Thomas William Cartwright (1935-2007) Test Cap No:424

© Getty image
Full name Thomas William Cartwright
Born July 22, 1935, Alderman's Green, Coventry, Warwickshire
Died April 30, 2007 (aged 71 years 282 days)
Major teams England, Glamorgan, Somerset, Warwickshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium
Other Coach

Profile
Tom Cartwright in action,
© Playfair Cricket Monthly
Tom Cartwright was such a clever medium-pacer - accurate, patient and fully armed with party tricks - that he would have prospered in any age, including that of covered pitches, which were brought in after his retirement from county cricket. However, although he finished high in the bowling averages year after year, he was restricted to a measly five England caps because it was felt that he would probably struggle to dismiss international batsmen on Test pitches (which were covered). Whether that opinion was justified nobody can tell. On the basis of Cartwright's England baptism, when he took 2 for 118 from 77 overs in Australia's 656 for 8 at Old Trafford in 1964, he was unlucky to be denied a longer run. Slightly under 6ft tall, thinly built and with a lovely fluid, wheeling action, Cartwright looked as though he could bowl forever. To a hemmed-in batsman, it must often have seemed that he was. Overall, mainly for Warwickshire but later for Somerset, his overs cost a fraction more than two runs each. He later had a distinguished coaching career, helping the young Ian Botham and earning the MBE for some sterling work in Wales.

Cartwright, Thomas William, MBE, died on April 30, 2007, aged 71. Tom Cartwright was a cricketer's cricketer. Perhaps no player of his generation had so much respect from his colleagues - for his abilities, his character, which was forceful without being abrasive, and his love and knowledge of the game. Not everyone was so appreciative: committee men often thought him truculent, and he played only five Tests for England, a figure that does no justice to his skills or his standing.

Don Wilson (1937-2012) Test Cap No: 418

© sport.uk.msn.com
Full name Donald Wilson
Born August 7, 1937, Settle, Yorkshire
Died July 21, 2012, York Hospital (aged 74 years 349 days)
Major teams England, Yorkshire
Batting style Left-hand bat
Bowling style Slow left-arm orthodox

Profile
© The Cricketer International
Don Wilson was Yorkshire's left-arm successor to Johnny Wardle, and he served the county well during their last sustained period of success. Tall and wiry, he was a favourite with spectators, taking 100 wickets in a season five times, including in three of the seven seasons he was part of their Championship-winning side, and in 1966 he took two hat-tricks. He toured twice with England, to India in 1963-64 and to Australia and New Zealand in 1970-71, Five of his six Tests came on the subcontinent, with the sixth against New Zealand as a reward at the end of a long Ashes series. He also played twice for England against Rest of the World in 1970, matches that were subsequently stripped of their status as Tests by the ICC. He retired from Yorkshire in 1974 and took up the role of MCC's chief coach at Lord's, a position he held until 1991. He continued his links with the game by returning to Yorkshire as coach at Ampleforth College.

Wilson was a central figure in Yorkshire's domination of county cricket in the 1960s, playing alongside such greats as Fred Trueman, Brian Close, Ray Illingworth and Geoffrey Boycott.The team began to break up after winning a third successive championship in 1968 but Wilson, whose sense of fun made him a popular figure with Yorkshire crowds, did not retire until 1974.Off the field, he had a keen sense of the theatrical and needed little encouragement before embarking on a song and dance routine with another Yorkshire and England team mate, Phil Sharpe.Wilson followed in Yorkshire's great tradition of  left-arm spinners, following such celebrated names as Wilfred Rhodes and Johnny Wardle. A tall and wiry bowler, he took 1,189 first-class wickets at 21.00 in 422 first-class matches and won seven Championships.He played six Tests for

© ESPNcricinfo Ltd
England, five against India on the 1963-4 tour and one against New Zealand on the 1970-1 tour of Australia and New Zealand. He also played twice for England against Rest of the World in 1970, matches that were subsequently stripped of their status as Tests by the ICC.After his retirement, he served as the MCC's chief coach from 1974 to 1991 and then as coach at Ampleforth College. He was president of the Yorkshire Players' Association in 2008.Donald Wilson (7 August 1937 – 21 July 2012) was an English cricketer, who played in six Tests for England from 1964 to 1971. His first-class cricket career (1957–1974)was spent with Yorkshire County Cricket Club.

Wilson was born in Settle, Yorkshire. He succeeded Johnny Wardle as Yorkshire's left-arm spinner, winning his Yorkshire cap in 1960, and was an integral part of Yorkshire's formidable 1960s side which dominated the County Championship. He was tall and wiry, relying on bounce more than savage side spin, and took 100 wickets in a season five times, including three of the seven seasons he was part of the Championship winning side. He also secured two hat-tricks in 1966.Derek Underwood owned the left arm spinner's spot in the England side during Wilson's career, but he ventured abroad twice with the national team. He toured India in 1963-64, where he played all five Test matches, and to Australia and New Zealand in 1970-71, where he played against New Zealand, at the end of Ray Illingworth's successful Ashes campaign.

He also played twice for England against the Rest of the World in 1970, after the cancellation of the South Africa tour. These were counted as full Test matches at the time, but were later stripped of their status. Wilson retired from Yorkshire in 1974,disillusioned by Geoffrey Boycott's captaincy, and took up the role as the MCC's chief coach at Lord's, a position he held until 1991.He then continued his life long involvement in the game by returning to Yorkshire, as coach at Ampleforth College. He died on 21 July 2012, in York,aged 74.

Test debut India v England at Chennai, Jan 10-15, 1964
Last Test New Zealand v England at Christchurch, Feb 25-Mar 1, 1971
First-class span 1957-1974
List A span 1963-1972

Philip John Sharpe (1936-2014) Test Cap No: 416

© The Cricketer International
Full name Philip John Sharpe
Born December 27, 1936, Shipley, Yorkshire
Died May 19, 2014 (aged 77 years 143 days)
Major teams England, Derbyshire, Norfolk, Yorkshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm offbreak

Profile
© The Cricketer International
Philip John Sharpe was an English cricketer, who played in twelve Tests from 1963 to 1969, and was one of the Wisden Cricketers of the Year in 1963. He played all of his county cricket for Yorkshire and Derbyshire, and played in Minor counties cricket for Norfolk.The cricketing correspondent, Colin Bateman, remarked, "Phil Sharpe was possibly unique in that he was selected by England for his exceptional catching ability in the slips"

Born on 27 December 1936 at Shipley, West Yorkshire, Sharpe attended public school, Worksop College, in the 1950s where he scored a 240 not out against Wrekin in 1955, a batting record which still stands. Most of his first-class cricket career was spent with his home county, Yorkshire, but he later moved on to Derbyshire. He was renowned for his excellent slip fielding, which yielded him over 600 catches.

© The Cricketer International
In 1963, Sharpe was picked by the selectors for his catching abilities to face the West Indies at Edgbaston. Although he was an accomplished and talented middle-order batsman, the England team had been guilty in previous matches of dropping crucial catches, particularly behind the wicket.However, after half a dozen mediocre performances, Sharpe was discarded until, in 1969, he was recalled for much the same reason as his original selection.His responded by taking a total of seventeen catches, batted more consistently, including recording his maiden Test century against New Zealand at Trent Bridge that same year, but he suffered from the fact that England had no upcoming winter tour. His twelfth and final Test was at The Oval in August 1969 though he played in the first test against the Rest of the World in 1970 – a match that at the time carried test status.His Test average of 46.23 was better than many, before and since, who have been picked to play for the national side.Sharpe went on to win seven County Championships with Yorkshire. His catch, standing close in against the West Indies at Old Trafford in 1969, to dismiss Joey Carew was described by Wisden, in their classic style of understatement, as "memorable".After his playing days were over, Sharpe served as an England Test selector.He died after a short illness on May 19 2014.

Although he won seven County Championships and averaged 46.23 in 12 Tests for England, including a century versus New Zealand at Trent Bridge in 1969, Phil Sharpe's name is still more of a byword for brilliance in the slips. A single example will do: standing very close in against West Indies at Old Trafford in 1969, he held an amazing catch off a ferocious slash by Joey Carew. The Wisden Almanack, in a classic piece of British understatement, described it as "memorable". Actually, it took the breath away. Mind you, he probably did it every week for Yorkshire.

Test debut England v West Indies at Birmingham, Jul 4-9, 1963
Last Test England v New Zealand at The Oval, Aug 21-26, 1969
First-class span 1956-1976
List A span 1963-1982

Leonard John Coldwell (1933-1996) Test Cap No:411

© coldwell-roots.co.uk
Full name Leonard John Coldwell
Born January 10, 1933, Newton Abbot, Devon
Died August 6, 1996, Teignmouth, Devon (aged 63 years 209 days)
Major teams England, Worcestershire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast-medium

Profile
Len Coldwell was a well-built fast-medium swing and seam bowler, who generated surprising pace off a short run and was able to bowl long spells. He began with Devon, moving to Worcestershire after two seasons, becoming part of the very strong Worcester side of the 1960s. His new-ball partnership with Jack Flavell contributed to the county's titles in 1964 and 1965. He made his Test debut in 1962, 13 wickets in two Tests against Pakistan winning him selection for that winter's Ashes series. His style, however, was more suited to English conditions and he struggled, although he reappeared in the first two Tests of the 1964 series against Australia. His career came to a sudden end midway through 1969 when he returned to Devon to take up an appointment with a brewery.

Geoffrey Millman (1934-2005) Test Cap No:409

Full name David Robert Smith
Born October 5, 1934, Fishponds, Bristol
Died December 17, 2003, Bristol (aged 69 years 73 days)
Major teams England, Gloucestershire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium

Profile
Opposing counties were apt to make the mistake in the late 1950s and through the 1960s of thinking Gloucestershire were a soft touch when it came to their new ball attack. David Robert Smith, like his partner Tony Brown, wasted the minimum of energy on his run-up. What he did possess was a handsome action, an ability to hit the seam with constant accuracy and a natural away swing from the right-hander. And he was faster than he looked. There was more than a touch of technical malevolence in that deceptively leisurely approach: after all, it brought him 1,250 wickets from 1956-70 and five Tests against India in 1961-62. He topped 100 wickets in a season five times. Apart from his Test appearances, when conditions in India did him no great favours, he had gone on the 1960-61 MCC tour to New Zealand.

David Robert Smith (1934-2003) Test Cap No:407

Full name David Robert Smith
Born October 5, 1934, Fishponds, Bristol
Died December 17, 2003, Bristol (aged 69 years 73 days)
Major teams England, Gloucestershire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium

Profile
Opposing counties were apt to make the mistake in the late 1950s and through the 1960s of thinking Gloucestershire were a soft touch when it came to their new ball attack. David Robert Smith, like his partner Tony Brown, wasted the minimum of energy on his run-up. What he did possess was a handsome action, an ability to hit the seam with constant accuracy and a natural away swing from the right-hander. And he was faster than he looked. There was more than a touch of technical malevolence in that deceptively leisurely approach: after all, it brought him 1,250 wickets from 1956-70 and five Tests against India in 1961-62. He topped 100 wickets in a season five times. Apart from his Test appearances, when conditions in India did him no great favours, he had gone on the 1960-61 MCC tour to New Zealand.

David William White (1935-2008) Test Cap No:406

Keith Wheatley and Butch White at Hampshire Players,
re union in 2002 © Hampshire County Cricket Club
Full name David William White
Born December 14, 1935, Sutton Coldfield, Warwickshire
Died August 1, 2008, West Sussex Golf Club, Pulborough, West Sussex (aged 72 years 231 days)
Major teams England, Glamorgan, Hampshire
Batting style Left-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast

Profile
A MEMORABLE POSE:© trialx.com
The majority of Butch White's 16-year career was spent with Hampshire and he was part of the side that won the Championship title for the first time in 1961. He formed a powerful new-ball combination alongside Derek Shackleton, who died less than a year ago, but after a decade of loyal service he was ignominiously discarded after an injury-blighted summer in 1971. He finished his playing days with one season at Glamorgan in 1972, but it's his exploits on the south coast that he'll be remembered for.A broad-shouldered bowler with a long run-up, his best figures were 9 for 44 against Leicestershire in 1966 and he took over 100 wickets on four occasions.

The two Tests he played came on docile pitches in Pakistan, but he played his part on debut with 3 for 65 in the first innings at Lahore, as England went on to win by five wickets. Some attributed his lack of international recognition to the fact he had been no-balled by Paul Gibb twice in 1960, although team-mate Roy Marshall argued that White's action made throwing an impossibility.

John Alfred Flavell (1929-2004) Test Cap No:403

© En.wikipedia.org
Full name John Alfred Flavell
Born May 15, 1929, Wall Heath, Staffordshire
Died February 25, 2004, Barmouth, Gwynedd (aged 74 years 286 days)
Major teams England, Worcestershire
Batting style Left-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast-medium

Profile
Jack Flavell, the England and Worcestershire fast bowler, died in his sleep on February 25, aged 74. Born in Wall Heath in Staffordshire, his 401 first-class appearances produced 1,529 wickets. He played four times for England, twice in 1961 and 1964 at home against Australia. He signed for Worcestershire in 1949 and soon earned a reputation as a tearaway fast bowler with an overlong run-up. Known then as "Mad Jack" it took him several seasons before he cut both pace and length of run-up, and he quickly became one of the outstanding new ball bowlers in county cricket. He took over 100 wickets in a season eight times, with his 171 wickets in 1961 putting him top of the national averages.Tom Graveney, who joined Worcestershire in 1962, says this of his first season. "I stood at first slip and was always amazed when I had a look at the ball after Jack's first over. There was hardly a mark on either polished side, because his superb hand action meant he usually hit the seam. His method was simple. He came in off an economical run-up and bowled so close to the stumps that he effectively bowled from middle to middle stump.

David Arthur Allen (1933-2014) Test Cap No: 398

© en.wikipedia.org

Full name David Arthur Allen
Born October 29, 1935, Horfield, Bristol, Gloucestershire
Died May 25, 2014 (aged 78 years 208 days)
Major teams England, Gloucestershire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm offbreak

Profile
© The Cricketer International
David Arthur Allen was an English cricketer who played first-class cricket for Gloucestershire between 1953 and 1972. He also played 39 Test matches for England.An accurate offspinner, David Allen had trouble maintaining a steady place in the England teams of the 1960s, with competition from Titmus, Mortimore, and Illingworth. He bowled off no more than four or five paces, with a deceptively casual action. He could be unplayable on helpful wickets, but he mastered the art of bowling tightly on good wickets as well. He was first picked for England in 1959, but was unable to play through injury. When he did play, his 39 Tests included tours to all the current Test-playing nations. A useful bat, with a first class hundred to his credit, he thrived on adversity, memorably so when playing out Hall's final over of the 1963 Lord's test. He took 882 wickets for Gloucestershire in a career that spanned 19 years.

Allen was first selected for England in 1959 and in 1960 was selected as the Cricket Writers' Club Young Cricketer of the Year. Allen toured all the then-current Test-playing nations. He was a decent bat, his Test average higher than the all rounders Fred Titmus and Ray Illingworth, and in the 1963 Lord's Test against the West Indies, he notably played out the final two balls of Wes Hall's last over for a draw. Allen had protected Colin Cowdrey at the other end, who was pressed in to bat with his broken arm in plaster.[2] In the 1965-66 Ashes series Allen made 50 not out in the Third Test at Sydney, adding 93 for the last two wickets and took 4/47 as England won by an innings and 93 runs.

Allen was also famous for being taken off against Australia. In the decisive Fourth Test at Old Trafford in 1961 he took three quick wickets to have Australia nine wickets down, but Alan Davidson hit him for 20 runs in an over and Peter May took him off. Davidson added 98 for the last wicket and Australia won by 54 runs. Nevertheless, in six winters, Allen completed the set of playing against all the other Test playing nations of the time.In India and Pakistan in 1961-62, he bowled 482 overs in the Test series alone.

A right-arm off-break bowler, using a very short run, Allen came close to developing into an all-rounder on the level of Fred Titmus. Playing fairly regularly for England throughout the first half of the 1960s, after 1966 he found it increasingly difficult to score enough runs or get enough bowling at county level as trends changed. Gloucestershire used three spin bowlers from the 1950s onwards but by the end of the 1960s Mike Bissex and Allen were effectively doing the work of one bowler. Though Bissex lost form, the advent of Sadiq Mohammad, a useful leg spinner, saw Allen fade away from the county side in 1972. Cricket commentator Colin Bateman noted that "towards the end of his 20 summers at Bristol his relationship with skipper Tony Brown, with whom he had grown up on a cricket field, became strained. Allen even found himself left out of his own benefit match".In later years, Allen was a member of the Gloucestershire County Cricket Club committee, and was elected club president in 2011.

Test debut West Indies v England at Bridgetown, Jan 6-12, 1960
Last Test England v West Indies at Manchester, Jun 2-4, 1966
First-class span 1953-1972

Geoffrey Pullar (1935-2014) Test Cap No:396

© PA Photos
Full name Geoffrey Pullar
Born August 1, 1935, Swinton, Lancashire
Died December 26, 2014 (aged 79 years 147 days)
Major teams England, Gloucestershire, Lancashire
Batting style Left-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak

Profile
Geoffrey Pullar was an English cricketer, who played for Lancashire, Gloucestershire and in 28 Tests for England.His affectionate nickname was 'Noddy', as, once he was out, he was known to sleep often in the dressing room whilst the rest of the team took their turn at the crease.He was, however, a skilled batsman, rarely lifting the ball off the surface while driving elegantly and adept at accumulating by flicking the ball off his toes towards fine leg. Preferring to play off the front foot, Pullar was also a good puller of the ball and could crack a square cut. In his younger days he had been compared to Charlie Hallows and Eddie Paynter, two of Lancashire's crowd pleasing greats - he had the artistry of the former and the pugnacious aggression and watchful determination of the latter. Unlike most left-handers, Pullar was rarely guilty of flashing outside the off stump and showed excellent judgement.

Pullar was born in Swinton, Lancashire in 1935,and was a product of Werneth Cricket Club, which was close to where he went to school in Oldham; while there he showed equal talent as a leg break bowler as well as with his batting - but with Tommy Greenhough, Bob Barber and Sonny Ramadhin variously based at Old Trafford, Pullar's bowling was rarely called upon in first-class cricket.Originally a middle order batsman, the left-handed Pullar was tried as an opener in Test matches against India in 1959, and was an instant success, scoring 75 at Headingley, and 131 at Old Trafford, the first ever Test century by a Lancastrian at the ground.

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He then became a fixture in the England side for four years, making four centuries in all and averaging more than 43.Pullar did well against South Africa at home series of 1960, following a solid winter tour of the West Indies where he played in all five tests against a bowling attack including Wes Hall, Garfield Sobers and Charlie Griffith who had his debut in the fifth test. He had a good tour to India and Pakistan in 1961-62, and topped the batting averages despite bagging a pair in the first Test in Pakistan. His highest Test score was 175 against the South Africans at The Oval in 1960, when he put on 290 for the first wicket with Colin Cowdrey. He had modest success against the Australians in 1961, when Davidson snared him five times, and Pullar only played twice against Pakistan in England in 1962, scoring only 27 runs in two knocks while others, notably Peter Parfitt, scored freely against a moderate attack. After the tour to Australia in 1962-63, during which he fell ill with pleurisy, Pullar lost his England place and never regained it.

After some years of declining success for Lancashire, he joined Gloucestershire in 1969, and topped the county's batting averages in his first season. But arthritis in his knees forced his retirement after just six matches the following year.Pullar was elected Young Cricketer of the Year in 1959 by the Cricket Writers' Association (a year in which he scored three tons against the champions, Yorkshire) and he was one of the Wisden Cricketers of the Year in 1960. He also won a junior England cap for table tennis.Pullar died at age 79 on 25 December, 2014.

Test debut England v India at Leeds, Jul 2-4, 1959
Last Test Australia v England at Adelaide, Jan 25-30, 1963
First-class span 1954-1970

Martin John Horton (1934-2011) Test Cap No:394

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Full name Martin John Horton
Born April 21, 1934, Worcester
Died April 3, 2011, Worcester (aged 76 years 347 days)
Major teams England, Northern Districts, Worcestershire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm offbreak
Other Coach

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Martin Horton batting in the tour opener at Worcester © PA Photos
Martin Horton was a useful allrounder who was a key member of the Worcestershire side which won the Championship in 1964 and 1965. He was primarily a batsman, with a short backlift he was strong on the off and particularly good at cutting. His offspin wasn't bad either, and he achieved the double in 1955 and 1961 (he passed 1000 runs 11 times, and in 1959 scored 2468 runs). His finest hour with the ball was against the 1955 South African side when he took 9 for 56. In 1959 he was chosen for the first Test against India, scoring 58 in an innings victory and bowling 19-11-20-0 in India's second innings. At Lord's, in another easy win, he took 2 for 24, and although he failed with the bat he was unlucky to be dropped. At the end of the 1966 season he moved to New Zealand where he played four seasons for Northern Districts and was also New Zealand's coach for almost 17 years. He subsequently returned to the UK and resumed his association with Worcestershire as their chairman.
Martin Horton, who played two Tests for England in 1959 as an allrounder, has died after a long illness at the age of 76.Horton made his debut for Worcestershire in 1952 and for a decade-and-a-half was a regular in the side.

Thomas Greenhough (1931-2009) Test Cap No:393

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Full name Thomas Greenhough
Born November 9, 1931, Cronkey Shaw, Rochdale, Lancashire
Died September 15, 2009 (aged 77 years 310 days)
Major teams England, Lancashire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak googly

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Greenhough, Thomas, died on September 15, 2009, aged 77. An accurate, big- spinning leg-break bowler with a longish run-up, a distinctive whirling action and a well- disguised googly, Tommy Greenhough had two memorable seasons for Lancashire - 1959 and 1960 - taking more than 100 wickets in both and earning all four of his England caps.

John Brian Mortimore (1933-2014) Test Cap No: 392

Full name John Brian Mortimore
Born May 14, 1933, Southmead, Bristol
Died February 13, 2014 (aged 80 years 275 days)
Major teams England, Gloucestershire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm offbreak

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John Mortimore was a lean and stately offspinner, who was a staple of the Gloucestershire side for a quarter of a century and also won nine England caps at the height of his prowess.If he never entirely convinced at Test level, where he averaged 24 with the bat and 58 with the ball, his partnership with his fellow offspinner David Allen at Gloucestershire was acknowledged as one of the most respected double acts on the county circuit. Mortimore spun the ball less sharply than Allen but he possessed cunning and accuracy.

Mortimore's career highlight for Gloucestershire, his native county, was taking four wickets in five balls against Lancashire at the Cheltenham Festival in 1962. His first-class career spanned 26 seasons from 1950 to 1975 and he also captained Gloucester between 1965 and 1967. He took 100 or more wickets in a season three times, scored 1,000 runs or more in a season five times, and in 1959, 1963 and 1964 he did both in the one season: the coveted double.

But it was his part in one of county cricket's great folklore moments that will be remembered as fondly as anything. He was also bowling when Lancashire's David Hughes launched his famous twilight assault - 24 off an over - in the Gillette Cup semi-final of 1971 at Old Trafford. It was so dark that Hughes had wondered before his assault whether the light was adequate. "You can see the moon," responded the umpire Arthur Jepson. "How far do you want to see?"

The first of Mortimore's nine Test appearances came when he was sent out as a replacement for Peter May's struggling team in the 1958-59 Ashes series. He topped the batting averages, somewhat freakishly, by virtue of being dismissed only once in the series. It was a productive time for England offspinners and the presence of the likes of Raymond Illingworth, Fred Titmus and Allen, all of whom were stronger batsmen, meant that his call ups were irregular.

Mortimore toured India in 1963-64, playing three Tests in a notoriously slow-scoring series. In the fifth Test at Kanpur, on the deadest of surfaces, he endured a marathon stint of 72 overs and returned remarkable figures of 1 for 67.He had the misfortune to be brought into the England side on another batsman-friendly surface when England met Auastralia in the Old Trafford Test in 1964. Only 18 wickets fell for 1271 runs and Mortimore, among those wicketless, never played Test cricket again.His highest score came against Nottinghamshire at Nottingham in 1963, when he scored 149, "a brilliant maiden Championship century by Mortimore in two hours twenty minutes", according to Wisden.

Test debut Australia v England at Melbourne, Feb 13-18, 1959
Last Test England v Australia at Manchester, Jul 23-28, 1964
First-class span 1950-1975

Clement Arthur Milton (1928-2007) Test Cap No:387

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Full name Clement Arthur Milton
Born March 10, 1928, Bedminster, Somerset
Died April 25, 2007, Bristol (aged 79 years 46 days)
Major teams England, Gloucestershire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium

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Clement Arthur Milton was an English cricketer and footballer. He played County cricket for Gloucestershire from 1948 to 1974, playing six Test matches for England in 1958 and 1959. He also played domestic football for Arsenal between 1951 and 1955, and then for a brief period for Bristol City. He played one match for England in 1951, against Austria at Wembley.He was the last man,and the last survivor, of the twelve people to have played at the highest international level for both England's football and cricket teams.The cricket writer, Colin Bateman, described Milton as a, "stylish, relaxed run-maker".

Milton was born in Bedminster, in Bristol, and was educated at Cotham Grammar School also in Bristol. A natural sportsman, he became School Captain of cricket, football and rugby union. He also showed talent at mathematics, but decided to pursue sporting glory rather than attend university.Milton played for Stapleton Cricket Club as an all-rounder, and then started to play for Gloucestershire Second XI. He made his first-class debut for Gloucestershire in June 1948, against Northants. He went on to play county cricket in 585 matches over 26 years, until he retired in 1974.

Milton was 12th man in the Ashes series against Australia in 1953, and was named as 12th man again for the first Test against South Africa in 1955 (although he was forced to withdraw through injury). He played six Tests for England between 1958 and 1959.He made his Test debut in the third Test against New Zealand on 3 July 1958 at Headingley.

Frederick John Titmus (1932-2011) Test Cap No:381

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Full name Frederick John Titmus
Born November 24, 1932, Kentish Town, London
Died March 23, 2011 (aged 78 years 119 days)
Major teams England, Middlesex, Orange Free State, Surrey
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm offbreak

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Fred Titmus is hugged by his children,
Dawn and Mark upon his return from,
the West Indies © PA Photos
Frederick John Titmus MBE whose first-class career spanned five decades.Although he was best known for his off spin (though at first he bowled medium pace as well), he was an accomplished lower-order batsman who deserved to be called an all-rounder, even opening the batting for England on six occasions. Outside of cricket, Titmus was also an able footballer; at one stage he was contracted to Watford as a professional, having earlier played for Chelsea as a junior.

Titmus was in his school's first XI by the age of thirteen, and when sixteen he wrote to Lord's, the ground being very close to his home, to ask for a trial. He was quickly accepted onto the MCC groundstaff, and in June 1949 he was plucked straight from the groundstaff to make his first-class cricket debut against Somerset at Bath. Although he did little in the match, his selection for the first team at such a young age was a clear sign of his potential.

1950 was Titmus's first full season of county cricket, and he performed reasonably well, taking 55 wickets including 7–34 against [Minor Counties in July. His appearances in 1951 and 1952 were restricted because of his National Service obligations, although he kept his hand in with games for the Combined Services. In 1953 he returned to play for Middlesex full-time, and took 105 wickets, the first of 16 years in which he would reach three figures.

Kenneth Frank Barrington (1930-1981) Test Cap No:380

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Full name Kenneth Frank Barrington
Born November 24, 1930, Reading, Berkshire
Died March 14, 1981, Needham's Point, Bridgetown, Barbados (aged 50 years 110 days)
Major teams England, Surrey
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak

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© Getty image

Just how gifted a games player Ken Barrington was can be gauged from the fact that to reclaim, then permanently keep, his Test place after being dropped, he abandoned his natural attacking style to become one of cricket's most notorious stonewallers. The revised method cost him his place once, by way of punishment for taking 435 minutes to score 137 against a humdrum New Zealand attack at Edgbaston in 1965, but overall it served him brilliantly. England too - before a heart attack forced premature retirement at 37, Barrington amassed 6806 Test runs at an average (58.67) surpassed for England only by Herbert Sutcliffe. A thickset 5ft 9ins, crinkly haired and strong-featured, in anything but batting gear Barrington was jovial and gregarious, always ready to see the best in everyone and every situation. Famous for mixed metaphors, his best-known quip came in answer to a Surrey fan commiserating over his lack of form after a sequence of four low single-figure scores, two ducks among them. "How d'you know I'm out of form?" shot back Ken indignantly: "I've only had nine balls all week!" It shattered Ian Botham's touring team when Barrington, England's assistant manager and a much-loved figure everywhere he went, died suddenly in Barbados in 1981 after another heart attack. John Thicknesse

Michael Colin Cowdrey (1932-2000) Test Cap No:379

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Full name Michael Colin Cowdrey
Born December 24, 1932, Bangalore, India
Died December 4, 2000, Angmering Park, Littlehampton, Sussex (aged 67 years 346 days)
Major teams England, Gentlemen, Kent, Marylebone Cricket Club, Oxford University
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak

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© Getty Images
Baron Cowdrey of Tonbridge, died on December 4, 2000, aged 67, after suffering a stroke earlier in the year. Michael Colin Cowdrey was successively known to the world as Michael Cowdrey - when Wisden reported on him as a 13-year-old schoolboy prodigy - Colin Cowdrey, Sir Colin and finally Lord Cowdrey, when he became the first English cricketer to be given a peerage. In an era of outstanding English batsmen, he was the most durable, with a Test career spanning more than two decades. On his journey from teenage phenomenon to sporting statesmen, he was at the heart of the game for half a century: Cowdrey was the first man to play 100 Tests, captained England 27 times and scored almost 43,000 first-class runs - 7,624 of them in Tests. In later years,

he played a major role behind the scenes in marrying the traditions of international cricket with modern demands. Yet it was still possible, and only mildly unkind, for one of his contemporaries, Fred Trueman, to describe Cowdrey on his death as "a terrific talent who never fulfilled his potential". Amid the triumphs there was often a vague sense of unease: of unexpected failures, opportunities not taken. Despite everything, Cowdrey never achieved the greatest accolade English cricket can offer: he toured Australia six times, which equalled a world record held by Johnny Briggs, but never once was he selected as captain; every time a more forceful figure shoved him out of the way when it mattered.

Keith Vincent Andrew (1929-2010) Test Cap No:378

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Full name Keith Vincent Andrew
Born December 15, 1929, Greenacres, Oldham, Lancashire
Died December 27, 2010 (aged 81 years 12 days)
Major teams England, Northamptonshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak
Fielding position Wicketkeeper
Other Coach, Administrator

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Mike Turner presents Keith Andrew with the Midland,
Knock-Out Cup after Northants' victory, May 9, 1962.
© The Cricketer International
Keith Vincent Andrew played in two Tests, in 1954-55 and in 1963.Born in Greenacres, Oldham, Lancashire, Andrew was a fine wicketkeeper who might have played more times for England, but for the fact that his batting was never more than adequate, and his career coincided with that of Godfrey Evans.He was recruited out of the Lancashire League by Northamptonshire and became the county's regular wicketkeeper in 1954. He was a success straight away, and Wisden 's 1955 edition noted that he was "above the ordinary, a very quick perception enabling him to seize almost every chance".

Frank Holmes Tyson (1930-2015) Test Cap # 377


Full name Frank Holmes Tyson
Born June 6, 1930, Farnworth, Lancashire
Died September 27, 2015, Queensland (aged 85 years 113 days)
Major teams England, Northamptonshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast
Other Coach, Commentator

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Frank Holmes Tyson was an England cricketer of the 1950s who became a journalist and cricket commentator after he emigrated to Australia in 1960. Nicknamed "Typhoon Tyson" by the press, he was regarded by many commentators as one of the fastest bowlers ever seen in cricket and took 76 wickets (18.56) in 17 Test matches. Tyson rarely appears on lists of best Test bowling averages as they usually require a minimum of 100 Test wickets.However, he has the seventh lowest bowling average in Test cricket for bowlers who have taken over 75 wickets, and no bowler since Tyson has taken more than 20 wickets at a lower average. In 2007 a panel of judges declared him Wisden Leading Cricketer in the World for 1955 due to his outstanding tour of Australia in 1954–55 in which he was instrumental in retaining the Ashes.

Tyson's mother was Violet Tyson (born 1892) and his father worked for the Yorkshire Dyeing Company, but died before his son was selected for England.As a boy he played cricket with his elder brother David Tyson, who served in Australia during the war and at Queen Elizabeth's Grammar School, Middleton, where he practised his run-up on the balcony. Unusually for a professional cricketer in the 1950s Tyson was a university graduate and studied English literature at Hatfield College in the University of Durham. He was a qualified schoolmaster and used to read the works of Geoffrey Chaucer, George Bernard Shaw and Virginia Woolf on tour.Instead of sledging batsmen he quoted Wordsworth: "For still, the more he works, the more/Do his weak ankles swell".He completed his National Service in the Royal Corps of Signals in 1952 as a Keyboard Operator and Cypher. Sportsmen were generally retained on headquarters staff and he played cricket for his platoon, squadron, regiment, area command and the Army.He served at the Headquarters Squadron 4 Training Regiment where he controlled the movements of men transferring in and out of Catterick, but not very well. He abhorred guns and when he took his rifle training he made sure that he always missed the target. In 1952-53 he worked felling trees, which John Snow regarded as an excellent exercise for developing the muscles of a fast bowler and attended Alf Gover's East Hill Indoor School for cricketers. In 1954-55 Gover covered the Ashes tour as a journalist and advised Tyson to use the shorter run-up from his league cricket days, which proved to be a turning point in the series.

In terms of raw, unbridled pace, few bowlers in history can match England's Frank Tyson. Richie Benaud rated him the quickest he's ever seen. In 17 Tests, Tyson took 76 wickets at an average of 18. This was no brainless quickie, however - Tyson was a Durham University graduate, and had a penchant for quoting Shakespeare or Wordsworth to batsmen. Most famously, Tyson blew away Australia as England retained the Ashes in 1954-55. After starting off with 1 for 160 in defeat at Brisbane, he shortened his run and took 10 wickets at Sydney and nine more at Melbourne, when he took 7 for 27 in the second innings and frightened the life out of the Aussies. There can have been few faster spells in history than Tyson's in that innings. He skittled the opposition, and bowling downwind off a shorter run, was literally as fast as a typhoon. Injury plagued his career, though, and although he was tall and strong, he reached for the crease with his final stride and his action wasn't fluid, and he was finished by the time he was 30. He subsequently emigrated to Australia, where he became a headmaster for a time, before coaching Victoria. He also commentated and was a successful writer on the game.

Test debut England v Pakistan at The Oval, Aug 12-17, 1954
Last Test New Zealand v England at Auckland, Mar 14-18, 1959
First-class span 1952 - 1960