Wednesday, March 16

Frederick Ridgway(1923-2015 )Test Cap No.365

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Full name Frederick Ridgway
Born August 10, 1923, Stockport, Cheshire
Died October 2, 2015 (aged 92 years 53 days)
Major teams England, Kent
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast-medium

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An excellent right-arm bowler, Fred Ridgway debuted for Kent shortly after World War 2 and had the misfortune to be playing at a time when there were many other similar bowlers available for England. A small man, he was still able to work up a respectable pace, He took over 1000 first-class wickets in a career that spanned fifteen years, and is one of the few bowlers to have achieved the "double hat-trick", taking four wickets with consecutive deliveries against Derby in 1951. A useful lower-order bat and fine close fielder, he fell just short of achieving a first-class century. He took part in a county record 9th wicket partnership with BR Edrich in 1949. His one tour was to India with what has been described as the weakest England team to travel there. He and Statham shouldered the fast-bowling chores, and in the non-international matches he did well, capturing 41 wickets on the tour at a good average. With many top-players missing Ridgway played all five Tests but laboured on the unforgiving wickets of the sub-continent and against a strong Indian batting line up. His 7 wickets cost over 50 runs apiece and with Statham, and Trueman establishing themselves was not given the opportunity to play again.
Test debut India v England at Delhi, Nov 2-7, 1951
Last Test India v England at Chennai, Feb 6-10, 1952
First-class span 1946-1961

Donald Kenyon (1924-1996) Test Cap No:364

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Full name Donald Kenyon
Born May 15, 1924, Wordsley, Staffordshire
Died November 12, 1996, Worcester (aged 72 years 181 days)
Major teams England, Worcestershire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium

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David Sheppard and Don Kenyon walk out to bat
© Getty Images
Worcestershire's leading run-maker, Don Kenyon, who died on Nov 12 at the age of 72, served the county for so long and with such effect that he might arguably be regarded as the most towering figure in the county's long history. Between 1946 and 1967 he made a record 34,490 runs (34.18) for the club, with 70 centuries. Most memorably, he was captain when Worcestershire at long last won the Country Championship in 1964 and retained the title in 1965. They also reached two Gillette Cup finals in the 1960s, though unsuccessful in both.Kenyon was a professional, but he assumed the captaincy without difficulty at a time (1959) when amateurs still were preferred. He was not only a shrewd and observant cricketer, but he never felt compromised by too close an intimacy with his fellow wage-earning players. Authoritative and, where necessary, enterprising, he later said, `I did not need to crack the whip. I was a determined sort of chap and if I said something they knew I would stick to it.'

Nigel David Howard (1925-1979) Test Cap No:363

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Full name Nigel David Howard
Born May 18, 1925, Gee Cross, Hyde, Cheshire
Died May 31, 1979, Douglas, Isle of Man (aged 54 years 13 days)
Major teams England, Lancashire
Batting style Right-hand bat

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Nigel David Howard, died suddenly in the Isle of Man, where he had lived since his retirement from business three years earlier, on May 31, aged 54. He headed the Rossall batting averages in 1941 and 1942 and, making his first appearance for Lancashire in 1946 obtained a regular place in 1948 when he made the highest score of his career, 145 v Derbyshire at Old Trafford. In 1949 he took over the captaincy, which he retained until he retired from first-class cricket after the season of 1953 in order to devote himself to the family textile business.He was the youngest player ever to captain Lancashire. However, greatly helped by Washbrook, his senior professional, he led the county to the top of the table in 1950, captaining the Gentlemen at Lord's in 1951 and taking the MCC side to India and Pakistan at the end of that year. Unluckily he missed the latter part of this tour through illness. An attractive bat with a good range of strokes, especially when runs were wanted quickly,

Peter Barker Howard May (1929-1994) Test Cap No:361

Stuart Surridge, Surrey masseuse Sandy Tait,
and Peter May shake hands © Getty Images
Full name Peter Barker Howard May
Born December 31, 1929, The Mount, Reading, Berkshire
Died December 27, 1994, Liphook, Hampshire (aged 64 years 361 days)
Major teams England, Cambridge University, Surrey
Batting style Right-hand bat
Other Referee

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Peter May arrives back,
 from South Africa.
© Getty Images
Peter Barker Howard May, CBE, Died at his home in Hampshire on December 27, 1994, four days short of his 65th birthday. In the 1950s PBH May - the initials were part of the style of the man - came to represent the beau ideal of English batsmanship and sportsmanship. He was tall and handsome with a batting style that was close to classical, and he was the hero of a generation of schoolboys. To his contemporaries at Charterhouse he was a heroic figure much earlier: from a very young age it was clear that he was going to play for England and he glided towards greatness in an effortless-looking manner.

Peter May was born at Reading on December 31, 1929. He was an instinctive cricketer, though there was no background of the game in his family. When he was 13, the headmaster of Charterhouse barred him from the First XI for his own good, but as a 14-year-old in 1944 he made 108 against Harrow, an innings that had an extraordinary impact on the school. In four years in the school First XI he made 1,794 runs, averaging 54.36. He was advised, but not all that much, by the former England player George Geary. By 1947, his last year at school, he was clearly the best schoolboy batsman in the country, scoring an unbeaten 183 against Eton and 148 and 146 in the representative matches at Lord's.

He then had to do two years' national service as Writer May of the Royal Navy - the scorecard abbreviation Wtr puzzling at least one MCC member who thought he must be the mess waiter. By his second year, his clerical duties were being heavily interspersed with cricket and in 1949 he played enough to come third in the national averages behind Hardstaff and Hutton. That autumn he went up to Cambridge: in 1950 their batting side was as strong as any in the country and he was not immediately dominant, but he scored an unbeaten 227 against Hampshire, stepped into the Surrey team and quickly won his county cap.

Frank Anderson Lowson (1925-1984) Test Cap No:360

Full name Frank Anderson Lowson
Born July 1, 1925, Bradford, Yorkshire
Died September 8, 1984, Pool-in-Wharfedale, Yorkshire (aged 59 years 69 days)
Major teams England, Yorkshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm offbreak

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Frank Anderson Lowson was an English cricketer, who played in seven Tests for England from 1951 to 1955. In first-class cricket, Lowson amassed 15,321 runs at an average of over 37, but had drifted away from the county game by his early thrties.Lowson was born in Bradford, Yorkshire, England. A right-handed opening batsman from the Bradford League, Lowson came late to first-class cricket and then was an instant success as an opening batsman for Yorkshire, scoring 1,799 runs in his first season, 1949, and partnering Len Hutton in the most prolific season of Hutton's career. The following year, 1950, Lowson was even better, scoring 2,152 runs and during the first half of the 1950s he continued a hugely productive partnership with Hutton, often being described as a Hutton clone.The partnership moved into Test cricket against the South Africans in 1951. Lowson's first Test innings was 58 out of a first-wicket partnership of 99 with Hutton at Headingley, and he retained his place for the final match of the series at The Oval.

Donald Vincent Brennan (1920-1985) Test Cap No:359

Full name Donald Vincent Brennan
Born February 10, 1920, Eccleshill, Yorkshire
Died January 9, 1985, Ilkley, Yorkshire (aged 64 years 334 days)
Major teams England, Yorkshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Fielding position Wicketkeeper

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Donald Vincent Brennan, who died after a long illness on January 9, 1985, aged 64, played for Yorkshire from 1947 to 1953 and throughout that time was their regular wicketkeeper. So highly was he rated that in 1951 he was preferred to Godfrey Evans, who was perfectly fit and well, for the last two Test matches against South Africa. Granted that Evans had been temporarily below his best, that is an astonishing tribute, especially as in batting Evans was much the better of the two. Evans potentially a fine batsman, who needed the challenge of a Test to bring out his best form:

Thomas William Graveney(1927-2015) Test Cap No: 358

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Full name Thomas William Graveney
Born June 16, 1927, Riding Mill, Northumberland
Died November 3, 2015 (aged 88 years 140 days)
Major teams England, Gloucestershire, Queensland, Worcestershire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak
Other Commentator

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© espncricinfo.com
Tom Graveney was a classical batsman who might have played another 20 Tests if he had managed to convince his early captains that he could be relied on in a crisis. He had a few untimely dismissals at the start of his England career, and the impression that county cricket was his milieu might have been strengthened by the mountain of runs he scored, with so much grace and ease, for Gloucestershire. How misguided that was became clear when Graveney moved to Worcester in 1961, after losing the Gloucestershire captaincy. He forced himself back into the England team in 1966, and earned 24 more caps (and four of his 11 Test hundreds) after his 39th birthday. An affable man, "Long Tom" became a pub landlord in retirement, and was a BBC TV summariser for a time. His brother Ken also captained Gloucestershire, as did Ken's son David Graveney, who went on to become England's chairman of selectors.

Thomas William "Tom" Graveney OBE was a leading English cricketer, representing his country in 79 Test matches and scoring over 4,800 runs. In a career lasting from 1948 to 1972, he was the 13th person to score one hundred first-class centuries, and the first post-war player to do so. He played for Gloucestershire and Worcestershire, and helped Worcestershire win the county championship for the first time in their history. His achievements for England after being recalled in 1966 have been described as "the stuff of legend."Graveney was a Wisden Cricketer of the Year in 1953, captained England on one occasion and was awarded the OBE while still playing.His international career ended at the age of 42 when he played in a benefit match on the rest day of a Test match and was banned. In later life he worked as a cricket commentator for BBC Television and was the first former professional to be President of the Marylebone Cricket Club. He was one of the first 55 players inducted to the ICC Cricket Hall of Fame in 2009.

Willie Watson (1920-2004) Test Cap No:357

Willie Watson strides out to bat,
 © The Cricketer International
Full name Willie Watson
Born March 7, 1920, Bolton-on-Dearne, Yorkshire
Died April 24, 2004, Johannesburg, South Africa (aged 84 years 48 days)
Major teams England, Leicestershire, Yorkshire
Batting style Left-hand bat
Other Coach

Profile
© Wisden Cricket Monthly
Last summer Willie and Barbara Watson and my wife and I were entertained by the president of MCC during the Lord's Test. Sir Tim Rice presented both of us with his brother Jonathan's book, One Hundred Lord's Tests, a happy reminder of the stand we had shared in against the Australians 50 years before. It was a delightful reunion, but sadly it was the last time we would meet as Willie died in Johannesburg, South Africa, on April 24, aged 84. However, many happy memories linger on. After all, we had toured the Caribbean and Australia together, I bowled against him for Essex, batted with him for England and trained with him on the Scarborough football ground before breakfast during the cricket festival, which was painful after several heavy nights.Willie was a superb natural athlete and ball player who glided over football and cricket fields with both grace and pace. He was one of that very small select band who represented England at both cricket and football. This is something that will never happen again as football and indeed rugby have invaded the summer.
I believe Willie would have made more appearances at both cricket and football, if he had not spent five years in his late teens and early 20s in the army, instead of being coached by Yorkshire and Huddersfield Town Football Club. Our finest batsmen after the hostilities, Hutton, Compton and Edrich, had all established themselves at Test level in the late 1930s.

John Brian Statham (1930-2000) Test Cap No:356

© The Cricketer International
Full name John Brian Statham
Born June 17, 1930, Gorton, Manchester, Lancashire
Died June 10, 2000, Stockport, Cheshire (aged 69 years 359 days)
Major teams England, Lancashire
Batting style Left-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast-medium

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© The Cricketer International
John Brian Statham, CBE, died from leukaemia on June 10, 2000, aged 69. Brian Statham was one of the best of all English fast bowlers, and beyond question the best-liked. A gentle man who had to be persuaded to bowl a bouncer, he was a mainstay of the England team in its vintage period between 1951 and 1963: he took 252 wickets in 70 Tests. His name will forever be coupled with that of Freddie Trueman, though they actually played together in only half his Tests. Statham's name always came second because he was the foil to Trueman's sabre - and the more reticent man. In cricketing folklore he is remembered primarily for his accuracy: "If they miss, I hit," he would say. This diminishes his astonishing skill. He was indeed accurate; so are many fast-medium bowlers. Statham kept his line and length at a very high pace indeed, comparable with all but the very fastest of Test match bowlers. A batsman hit by Statham - even on the foot, which was more likely than the head - knew all about it. In Statham's case the area around off stump was more a corridor of certainty than uncertainty, but if the ball hit the seam it jagged back in very sharply. The results were always formidable, and occasionally devasting.

Roy Tattersall (1922-2011) Test Cap No:355

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Full name Roy Tattersall
Born August 17, 1922, Tonge Moor, Bolton, Lancashire
Died December 9, 2011 (aged 89 years 114 days)
Major teams England, Lancashire
Batting style Left-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm offbreak

Profile
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Roy Tattersall played for Lancashire and played sixteen Tests for England as a specialist off spin bowler. He was born at Bolton, Lancashire, England.Tattersall had an unusual style, quite different from the orthodox Jim Laker, who kept him out of a Test place for most of his career. Tattersall held his index finger around the seam of the ball and this allowed him to bowl a carefully disguised away-swinger to supplement his sharp off-break. He was rather faster than Laker, and this served to increase his penetration on the many wet wickets of his home county. Of small account as a batsman, he did nonetheless help Reg Simpson in a tenth wicket stand of 74 to give England its first victory over Australia since their record win at The Oval in 1938.

Tattersall, a late developer, began his first-class cricket career in 1948, at a time when English bowling was weak because World War II had decimated their pre-war pace attack. He first played for Lancashire in 1948 as a medium fast bowler, taking 66 Second XI wickets.

David Stuart Sheppard (1929-2005) Test Cap No:353

© The Cricketer International
Full name David Stuart Sheppard
Born March 6, 1929, Reigate, Surrey
Died March 5, 2005, England (aged 75 years 364 days)
Major teams England, Cambridge University, Sussex
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Slow left-arm orthodox

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Reverend David Sheppard addresses Ken Barrington's,
 memorial service © Getty Images
David Sheppard was an England batsman who became an ordained minister and rose to become the Bishop of Liverpool. A graceful driver, Sheppard came to the fore on Cyril Coote's pluperfect batting pitches at Fenner's. For the strong Cambridge University side of 1950 Sheppard (227) and John Dewes (183) shared an opening stand of 343 against the West Indian tourists - in response Everton Weekes hammered an unbeaten 304 out of 730 for 3 after Cambridge declared at 594 for 4. Later, in front of Sheppard's home-county crowd at Hove, he and Dewes (212) improved on that with a stand of 349 against Sussex.

Such form won Sheppard a place in the 1950 Test Trial, a match rather ruined by Jim Laker, who found the Bradford pitch to his liking and bowled out The Rest for 27 before lunch on the first day, taking 8 for 2. Sheppard only made 4, but he did escape Laker's clutches (Trevor Bailey got him instead). But he was in the selectors' thoughts, and made his debut in the final Test of the summer, scoring 29 and 11 at The Oval as England lost again to go down 3-1 to West Indies. Sheppard toured Australia that winter, with Freddie Brown's young but outgunned side, and played in three of the Tests with little success. He fell out of favour for a time, but returned in 1952 with 119, his first Test century, in the final Test against India at The Oval. The following year he captained Sussex, and spirited them up to second in the table, equalling their best performance until that long-awaited first Championship triumph in 2003. He also led England in two Tests in 1954, but Len Hutton returned to take charge of the Ashes tour in Australia.

Arthur John William McIntyre (1918-2009) Test Cap No:352

© The Cricketer International
Full name Arthur John William McIntyre
Born May 14, 1918, Kennington, London
Died December 26, 2009 (aged 91 years 226 days)
Major teams England, Surrey
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak
Fielding position Wicketkeeper

Profile
© The Cricketer International
A Surrey man through and through - he was born within sight of The Oval - Arthur McIntyre was Surrey's wicketkeeper during perhaps their finest period when they won seven back-to-back championships in the 1950s. Originally a legbreak bowler (he was proud of his four first-class wickets) he was asked to fill in as keeper in an emergency, and showed such aptitude for the task that he soon became Surrey's first choice. McIntyre debuted for Surrey just before the Second World War, and had the misfortune to lose what might have been his best years in the early 1940s. He was 28 when the war ended, and rapidly became established as a wicketkeeper of the highest class. He was especially effective standing up to Alec Bedser, making some spectacular stumpings as well as missing little from the edge.

His path to Test honours, however was blocked by Evans, and he played for England just three times. In fact for his one Test against Australia he was drafted into the side as an extra bat, Evans retaining the gloves. In a bizarre Test played on an appalling wicket, he had little chance to shine, particularly when he was called for an impossible fourth run by Evans in the second innings. If McIntyre were ever to replace Evans it would have needed to be on the strength of his batting, and he was never able to impress, failing to reach double figures in his three Tests (he was also unlucky in that England lost all three by substantial margins). He was a more than useful bat for Surrey with seven first-class centuries, and made 1000 runs in the English season three times. When he retired he had an impressive 795 victims as a keeper, and had seen Surrey go from strength to strength. He retained his association with Surrey for a further 20 years as coach, finally retiring in 1978, leaving an indelible impression on generations of young Surrey players.

Malcolm Jameson Hilton (1928-1990) Test Cap No:351

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Full name Malcolm Jameson Hilton
Born August 2, 1928, Chadderton, Lancashire
Died July 8, 1990, Oldham, Lancashire (aged 61 years 340 days)
Major teams England, Lancashire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Slow left-arm orthodox

Profile
Malcolm Hilton was the best slow left-arm bowler that Lancashire produced since the turn of the century. In May 1948 he became for a short time the most-discussed young man in the cricket world when, in only his third first-class match, he twice dismissed Bradman at Old Trafford. In the Australians' first innings the 19-year-old Hilton bowled the great man for 14, and in the second he had him stumped after beating him with his three previous deliveries. Thereafter, fearing that all the brouhaha might spoil him, Lancashire gradually withdrew him from the front line, but not before he had claimed 41 wickets at 21.07.