Tuesday, March 15

Derek Shackleton (1924-2007) Test Cap No:350

© ESPNcricinfo Ltd
Full name Derek Shackleton
Born August 12, 1924, Todmorden, Yorkshire
Died September 27, 2007 (aged 83 years 46 days)
Major teams England, Dorset, Hampshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium
Other Umpire, Coach

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Shackleton bowls, Ken Barrington watches during an experimental,
match at Lord's.© The Cricketer International
A model of consistency, accuracy and endurance, Derek Shackleton plied his trade for Hampshire for 21 seasons - perhaps only Wilfred Rhodes and Fred Titmus bowled more ball in first-class cricket, and they were spinners. John Arlott described his bowling as "shrewdly varied, and utterly accurateŠ beating down as unremittingly as February rain". He took more than 100 wickets in 20 consecutive summers, and his career average dropped season by season. One of the most respected bowlers of his generation, his domestic record was superb, 2857 wickets at an average of 18.65, conceding just over two runs per over.

William Gilbert Anthony Parkhouse (1925-2000) Test Cap No:348

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Full name William Gilbert Anthony Parkhouse
Born October 12, 1925, Swansea, Glamorgan, Wales
Died August 10, 2000, Carmarthen, Wales (aged 74 years 303 days)
Major teams England, Glamorgan
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium
Other Coach

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© Glamorgan County Cricket Club
William Gilbert Anthony Parkhouse who played in seven Tests for England in 1950, 1950-51 and 1959.Parkhouse was a right-handed batsman who spent most of his career as an opener for Glamorgan. He also played rugby union for Swansea.As a cricketer, he was a fast scorer and a stroke-maker. His obituary in Wisden Cricketers' Almanack said: "There were no obvious flaws in technique: he was orthodox, and happy to get on the back foot against both the quicks.he was a skilled hooker and the slows It was his effortless cover driving that is best remembered and he could on-drive beautifully."

Educated at Wycliffe College at Stonehouse in Gloucestershire, Parkhouse appeared in wartime non-first-class matches for Glamorgan and also in fixtures arranged for the 1945 season. Wisden for 1946 called him "a player of splendid natural style.He made his first-class debut in a pre-season friendly match in 1948, batting at No 3, and remained in that batting position for the whole of the season, which brought
Glamorgan's first County Championship. In his first Championship game, against Essex he scored 46 and 59. In mid-season he hit his first century, 117 against Sussex at Swansea, and a week later he hit a second, 103 against Yorkshire at Hull.In his first season as a whole, despite some loss of form in August, he made 1204 runs at an average of 25.07 runs per innings, and was awarded his county cap.

Robert Berry (1926-2006) Test Cap No:346

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Full name Robert Berry
Born January 29, 1926, West Gorton, Manchester, Lancashire
Died December 2, 2006 (aged 80 years 307 days)
Major teams England, Derbyshire, Lancashire, Worcestershire
Batting style Left-hand bat
Bowling style Slow left-arm orthodox

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Bob Berry signs a bat for a fan....
© Getty Images
© boundarybooks.com
Robert played in two Tests in 1950. He played county cricket for Lancashire from 1948 to 1954, for Worcestershire from 1955 to 1958, and for Derbyshire from 1959 to 1962. He was the first cricketer to be capped by three different counties.Berry was born in Gorton, Manchester, Lancashire, the youngest of 10 children.He played League cricket in both Lancashire and Cheshire before making his debut for Lancashire in 1948. Within two years and having taken barely more than 50 first-class wickets, he was in the England Test side, having taken 5 wickets in a Test trial.

Herbert Leslie Jackson (1921-2007) Test Cap No:345

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Full name Herbert Leslie Jackson
Born April 5, 1921, Whitwell, Derbyshire
Died April 25, 2007, Chesterfield (aged 86 years 20 days)
Major teams England, Derbyshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast

Profile
Les Jackson along with a Derbyshire team-mate
© Getty image
Tall and genuinely quick, with a slingy round-arm action and the ability to move the ball both ways, Les Jackson was unlucky in that his best years came when England had a successful side and an abundance of fast bowlers. He was also handicapped by playing for an unfashionable county.The war meant that he did not make his first-class debut until 1947, when he was 26. From then until he retired in 1963, he was an ever-present in the county side. His economical run-up, allied to his natural strength resulting from his time as a miner, allowed him to bowl long spells without much loss of pace. EW Swanton said his bowling was "hostile, full of stamina, from one summer's end to the next, scarcely guilty of even an indifferent over". He finished his career with 1733 first-class wickets, passing 100 in a season ten times, and his best year came in 1960 when he took 160 at 13.61. He had few pretensions with the bat, never making a fifty in more than 400 appearances.His two Test appearances were separated by 12 years. In 1949 he played against New Zealand at Manchester while Alec Bedser was rested, taking 3 for 72 in the match. In 1961, aged 40, he was a late call-up for the Ashes Test at Leeds when Brian Statham withdrew with a side strain. Opening with Fred Trueman, Jackson took 2 for 57 and 2 for 26 as England won by eight wickets. That aside, he never even got a tour. Trevor Bailey wrote that professionals around the country were aghast when John Warr, of Cambridge University and Middlesex, was preferred to Jackson for the 1950-51 trip to Australia.

Dennis Brian Close (1931-2015) Test Cap # 344

Full name Dennis Brian Close
Born February 24, 1931, Rawdon, Leeds, Yorkshire
Died September 13, 2015 (aged 84 years 201 days)
Major teams England, Somerset, Yorkshire
Batting style Left-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium, Right-arm offbreak
Fielding position Forward short leg

Profile
More stories have been told about Brian Close, or to be precise his eccentricities, than probably any postwar cricketer except maybe his fellow-Yorkshireman Fred Trueman. Close's courage, batting against the fastest bowling or fielding at short leg, was legendary. Seemingly impervious to pain himself, he used to say to anyone who flinched, or rubbed a bruise: "How can the ball hurt you? It's only on you for a second." On the one known occasion when he was hit by such force that he was knocked off his feet - by a short-arm pull by Hampshire's Danny Livingstone at Portsmouth - Close, sprang up and dismissed the slips and wicketkeeper (who were running towards him in concern) with an angry wave. Because he always tried to play the type of innings he considered the position of the match required, Close's record did scant justice to his talent, which was huge. He was a notably unselfish cricketer, a factor in the respect he won as Yorkshire, Somerset, and briefly, England captain, and the success his teams enjoyed. He was as stubborn as he was unselfish, however, and invariably found a pretext for a dismissal through some outlandish stroke. One from which the Yorkshire dressing-room derived most pleasure came when he was caught off a snow-gathering top-edge as he tried to pull John Price, the Middlesex fast bowler, into the Warner Stand at Lord's: "I had it covered for everything but uneven bounce," was Close's indignant explanation.

Of legendary toughness, Brian Close still holds the record for the youngest player to represent England, when, after a superb allround first season with Yorkshire, he was picked to play against New Zealand in 1949 at the age of 18. He never fully realised the promise of that first season, in and out of the England side over the next 27 years. Batting left, and bowling right-handed, he completed the double in 1949, the youngest player to do so. As a batsman he could defend with great obduracy, but could attack thrillingly, although not always wisely. He bowled medium-pace and offspin, with more consistency than his batting. He lost favour with the England selectors after trying to hit Benaud out of the attack in the 1961 Old Trafford Test, but returned to take England to the brink of victory in the 1963 Lord's Test against the West Indies. In this innings, his highest in Tests, he used unconventional tactics, coming up the wicket to the West Indies pace bowlers. He captained Yorkshire and England with success, but lost the England position after using delaying tactics in a county game. Later internal politics saw him move from Yorkshire to Somerset for the final years of his career. He was famous for his fearless fielding at short leg, where he would rarely duck or move to avoid a hard hit ball. He was also known for his courage against fast bowling, memorably so in 1976, when he was recalled at the age of 45 to face the fearsome West Indies pace trio of Holding, Roberts and Daniel. Subjected to a barrage of short-pitched bowling on the Saturday of the Old Trafford Test in less than favourable light, Close never flinched, and, as always, refused to rub the bruises when hit. In later years he played in the Lancashire League then returned to Yorkshire, and much controversy as chair of the cricket committee. He was an England selector in the late 70's.
Dave Liverman

Test debut England v New Zealand at Manchester, Jul 23-26, 1949
Last Test England v West Indies at Manchester, Jul 8-13, 1976
ODI debut England v Australia at Manchester, Aug 24, 1972
Last ODI England v Australia at Birmingham, Aug 28, 1972
First-class span 1949 - 1986
List A span 1972 - 1977

Alan Wharton (1923-1993) Test Cap No:343

© Pakistan Cricket Board
Full name Alan Wharton
Born April 30, 1923, Heywood, Lancashire
Died August 26, 1993, Colne, Lancashire (aged 70 years 118 days)
Major teams England, Lancashire, Leicestershire
Batting style Left-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium

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© sportspages.com
© boundarybooks.com
Alan Wharton, who died on August 26,1993, aged 70, was an attacking left-handed batsman who spent 15 years with Lancashire, three with Leicestershire and played a solitary Test for England. After hitting three centuries, plus 73 not out in the Roses match, he was picked against New Zealand at Headingley in 1949. He made seven and 13, missed the next Test through injury and was never picked again. But he remained a successful Lancashire player until 1960, when he moved to Leicestershire.

Trevor Edward Bailey (1923-2011) Test Cap No:342

© The Cricketer International
Full name Trevor Edward Bailey
Born December 3, 1923, Westcliff-on-Sea, Essex
Died February 10, 2011, Westcliff-on-Sea, Essex (aged 87 years 69 days)
Major teams England, Cambridge University, Essex
Nickname Barnacle, The Boil
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast-medium
Other Commentator, Journalist, Author

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Trevor Bailey with his wife, son and daughter.
© Ijaz Chaudhry
Trevor Bailey was one of the hardest, most doughty opponents you would wish to meet. An outstanding fast-medium bowler, brilliant fielder and generally dull batsman, whose resolute defence, rescued England from many a fix and earned him the nickname "Barnacle".A precocious schoolboy cricketer at Dulwich, he played for England at Lord's in 1944 and after a spell in national service, became a regular in the Essex side and won Blues in 1947 and 1948 at Cambridge. He made his Test debut in 1949, and for a decade, during which time England were the leading side in the world, he was at the heart of the team.He thrived in a crisis and in 1953, when England regained the Ashes after 19 years, their success owed much to him. At Lord's he batted for four-and-a-half hours in a famous last-day stand with Willie Watson, and at Headingely he bowled negative leg theory to put the skids on Australia's push for victory. That winter he took 7 for 34 against a powerful West Indies. He bowed out after England's wretched Ashes series in 1958-59, during which he made first-class cricket's slowest half-century, in 357 minutes at Brisbane, one of 14 matches in which he opened.

Reginald Thomas Simpson (1920-2013) Test Cap No.341

© PA Photos
Full name Reginald Thomas Simpson
Born February 27, 1920, Sherwood Rise, Nottingham
Died November 24, 2013 (aged 93 years 270 days)
Major teams England, Europeans (India), Nottinghamshire, Sind
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm offbreak

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Brian Croudy and Reg Simpson
© Victor Isaacs
Reg Simpson was a stylish opening bat for Nottinghamshire and England. Handsome, tall and dark, he cut an elegant figure at the wicket with his upright stance and flowing drives. A strong back-foot player, he hooked better than most tall men. He bowled occasional off-breaks, and was a fine fielder, especially in the covers. His first-class debut was delayed by the Second World War, and he was first seen playing for Sind in India, where he was stationed with the RAF.

© Getty Images
Simpson was 26 before he played first-class cricket in England, but he made an immediate impression, and was selected to tour South Africa in 1948-49. He played a single Test on that tour without passing double figures, but when picked to play against New Zealand the following year he made a century in the middle order. As an opener he found it hard to displace Hutton and Washbrook, and later faced competition from others and was in and out of the Test side over the next six years. In 1951 he took over the captaincy of a weak Nottinghamshire, and shouldered the burden for the next decade. Intermittent back problems did not prevent him amassing sixty four first-class centuries, and playing 27 Tests.

Simpson's finest hour was probably the 156* that was a primary contribution to England's first Test victory over Australia in 13 years, in the final game of the 1950-51 tour. Batting at No. 3, he was on 92 when the ninth wicket fell with England only 29 ahead. He took the attack to the Australians magnificently, and the last pair put on 74. EW Swanton said of this innings: "In such a mood Simpson's batsmanship looked akin to greatness". Such moods came upon him rarely however, and he was never able to reproduce the consistency of his county form at Test level. He retired in 1960, served on the Nottinghamshire committee, was made an honourary member of the MCC, and was a director of the bat-makers, Gunn and Moore.

Test debut South Africa v England at Durban, Dec 16-20, 1948
Last Test New Zealand v England at Auckland, Mar 25-28, 1955
First-class span 1944-1963

Francis George Mann (1917-2001) Test Cap No:340

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Full name Francis George Mann
Born September 6, 1917, Byfleet, Surrey
Died August 8, 2001, Stockcross, Berkshire (aged 83 years 336 days)
Major teams England, Cambridge University, Middlesex
Batting style Right-hand bat

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George Mann waits for Dudley Nourse,
to toss the coin at Newlands.
© Getty Images
Francis George Mann, CBE, DSO, MC, died on August 8, 2001, aged 83. The elder son of Frank Mann, who captained England in South Africa in 1922-23, George Mann similarly led an MCC side there, in 1948-49. He continued another family achievement by captaining England in each of his seven Tests: five in South Africa and two at home against New Zealand the following summer. Three years in the Eton XI, and captain in 1936, he won Blues in 1938 and 1939 while at Pembroke College, Cambridge. His younger brother, John Pelham Mann, also captained Eton and played a handful of games for Middlesex. George himself made his first-class debut for Middlesex in 1937 and played several games for them in those pre-war seasons. However, before he could prosecute either a cricketing or a business career, war intervened. He would have an outstanding war, rising to the rank of major with the Scots Guards. His resourceful courage and cheerful leadership, particularly in the Italian campaign, won him great acclaim and much-merited decoration. In one judgment he was assessed as "the best regimental officer in the British Army".

He brought much of the same spirit to captaincy. Needing time to recuperate from wounds, he did not return to cricket seriously until 1947, when he played in the majority of Middlesex's usually victorious matches of that resplendent summer.

Roland Oliver Jenkins (1918-1995) Test Cap No:339

Full name Roland Oliver Jenkins
Born November 24, 1918, Rainbow Hill, Worcester
Died July 22, 1995, Worcester (aged 76 years 240 days)
Major teams England, Worcestershire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak googly

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Roly Jenkins was one of the most popular, and skilful, county cricketers of the years just after the war. He will forever be associated with long afternoons at Worcester, running up to bowl his leg-breaks in his cap (though he batted without one) with a seaman's gait (though his furthest posting during the war was fire-watching at the top of Worcester Cathedral) and punctuating the game with a very mellow sort of humour. However, he was a fundamentally serious cricketer, indeed almost obsessive. He played nine Tests, but in the end his career may have been damaged by his constant search for perfection--as well as his propensity to make remarks that were not always appreciated by starchy authority.

Albert John Watkins (1922-2011) Test Cap No:338

© Glamorgan County Cricket Club
Full name Albert John Watkins
Born April 21, 1922, Usk, Monmouthshire
Died August 3, 2011, Kidderminster, Worcestershire (aged 89 years 104 days)
Major teams England, Glamorgan
Batting style Left-hand bat
Bowling style Left-arm medium-fast
Other Coach

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© ESPNcricinfo Ltd
Allan Watkins was a key member of Glamorgan's first Championship-winning side, in 1948, and in the same summer he became their first player to appear in an Ashes Test - it was a torrid baptism as he made 0 and 7, was badly hurt when hit on the shoulder by Ray Lindwall and only able to bowl four overs. He was a genuine allrounder at county level, a defensive middle-order batsman and a medium-fast swing bowler. However,

in his Test career the popular Watkins delivered only as a batsman, even though he opened the bowling on his debut. Thirteen of his 15 caps came against India and South Africa, and both his centuries came overseas against them: 111 at Johannesburg in 1948-49, and 137 not out at Delhi three years later. Watkins was a serious asthma sufferer, and doctors eventually advised him to give up first-class cricket midway through the 1962 season. He went on to coach schools, most notably Framlingham and Oundle. Watkins also played football for Plymouth Argyle and Cardiff City.

© ESPNcricinfo Ltd
The former Glamorgan allrounder, Allan Watkins, died in hospital in Kidderminster on Wednesday afternoon at the age of 89, following a short illness. In 15 Tests for England between 1948 and 1952, he became the first Glamorgan player to score a Test hundred and the first to appear in an Ashes Test.

His debut, at The Oval in 1948, was torrid, as he made 0 and 7 in two innings, and was unable to bowl more than four overs after being hit on the shoulder by Ray Lindwall. However, it was the match in which Don Bradman was bowled for a duck in his final Test innings, and Watkins was the last player to field a ball from him. He collected Bradman's first-ball defensive push and returned to the bowler Eric Hollies, who subsequently delivered the googly that stranded Bradman's career average on 99.94.

Watkins' personal zenith came the following winter in Johannesburg, where he scored 111 in a three-and-a-quarter-hour innings against South Africa in February 1949. He struck 15 fours in his stay, and later marked the feat by naming his home "Ellis Park" in honour of the venue. He added a second hundred against India in Delhi three years later, against whom he also returned his best Test bowling figures of 3 for 20.

John Gordon Dewes (1926-2015) Test Cap No:337

© telegraph.co.uk
Full name John Gordon Dewes
Born October 11, 1926, North Latchford, Cheshire
Died May 12, 2015 (aged 88 years 213 days)
Major teams England, Cambridge University, Middlesex
Batting style Left-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium
Relation Son - AR Dewes, Grandson - JJN Dewes

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© The Cricketer International
© The Cricketer International
John Gordon Dewes was an English cricketer, who played for Cambridge University and Middlesex, and was chosen for five Tests between 1948 and 1950.Dewes was a protegee of E. J. H. Nash, the British Evangelical Anglican clergyman (along with fellow cricketer David Sheppard).In 1945, he was one of three relative unknowns from public schools included in the England side for the third Victory Test against Australia at Lord's (it was his first-class debut). The others were Donald Carr from Repton School and the Etonian, Luke White. Dewes had left Aldenham School the previous year. In the event, the three contributed little, and did not figure again in the other Victory matches.His full Test debut came against Donald Bradman's formidable side in 1948, when he struggled to make runs against the opening attack of Ray Lindwall and Keith Miller. The next season, he shared a record unbeaten stand of 429 with Hubert Doggart for Cambridge against Essex and, in 1950, added 343 for the first wicket with David Sheppard in the Cambridge total of 594-4 declared against the touring West Indians.The 1950 season was Dewes' peak, and he scored 2,432 runs in the full season at an average of 59.31, with nine centuries.

George Malcolm Emmett (1912-1976) Test Cap No:336

© PA Photos
Full name George Malcolm Emmett
Born December 2, 1912, Agra, Uttar Pradesh, India
Died December 18, 1976, Knowle, Somerset (aged 64 years 16 days)
Major teams England, Gloucestershire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Slow left-arm orthodox
Other Coach

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George Malcolm Emmett, died on December 18, aged 61. Born in India, he started his career on the groundstaff at Lord's and then, after several successful seasons for Devon, began to qualify for Gloucestershire in 1936. The soundness of his method at once made it clear that he had great possibilities, but it was not until 1947 that he really fulfilled expectations. From then until 1959 he was one of the mainstays of the side, which he captained from 1955 to 1958. In all he made for Gloucestershire 22,806 runs with an average of 31 and scored 34 hundreds. A fine player on a turning wicket, he could also hit the ball astonishingly hard for so small a man and was always prepared to adapt his game to the needs of the side. In 1954 against Somerset at Taunton he scored the fastest century of the season, reaching his hundred in 84 minutes. Highly though he was rated for years, he played only once for England, against Australia at Old Trafford in 1948, when Lindwall's pace was too much for him. After his retirement from the Gloucestershire side he served the county further as groundsman and coach.

John Frederick Crapp (1912-1981) Test Cap No:335

© The Cricketer International
Full name John Frederick Crapp
Born October 14, 1912, St Columb Major, Cornwall
Died February 13, 1981, Knowle, Somerset (aged 68 years 122 days)
Major teams England, Gloucestershire
Batting style Left-hand bat
Other Umpire

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Jack Crapp bats......
© Getty Images
An effective middle-order bat for his county and England, and GloucestershireÕs first professional captain (although Cornish by birth). Left handed, he used a sound technique and great patience to accumulate many runs. An excellent first slip. His playing career was cut short by ill-health but later in life he became a well respected umpire. He appeared for England against Australia, and took part in a thrilling finish on the 1947-8 South African tour (Dave Liverman, 1998).

Crapp, John Frederick, who died at his home in Bristol on February 15, 1981, aged 68, had forty-two years' association with first-class cricket, broken only by the Second World War. He played for Gloucestershire from 1936 to 1956, fifteen seasons of cricket, in only one of which did he fail to make his 1,000 runs, and then for 21 years, until ill-health caused his retirement after 1978, he was a first-class umpire, several times officiating in Tests.

A solidly built left-hander, he was a reliable rather than a spectacular bat and in his early years was sometimes criticised for being too unenterprising - not that in a side containing Hammond and Barnett there was much danger of getting behind the clock. But with experience he learned to use with discretion his natural powers of hitting, and in the latter years of his career he was quite capable of forcing the pace when required. He was always a fine field, especially in the slips. In all he scored 23,615 runs with an average of 35.03, including 38 centuries.

Born at St Columb and said to be the only Cornishman ever to have played for England, he qualified for Gloucestershire by residence and at once adapted himself to first-class cricket, passing 1,000 runs in his first season. By 1938 he was already being talked of as a potential England player, but, the war intervening, he had to wait till 1948, when he was 36, for his chance. Then, after making 100 not out for his county against the Australians, he played in the Third Test and followed a valuable first innings of 36 at a crisis with 19 not out in the second. This secured him a place in the two remaining Tests, in which, however, he did little.

Alexander Coxon (1916-2006) Test Cap No:334

© The Cricketer International
Full name Alexander Coxon
Born January 18, 1916, Huddersfield, Yorkshire
Died January 22, 2006, Roker, Sunderland (aged 90 years 4 days)
Major teams England, Yorkshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium-fast
Other Coach

Profile
Yorkshire's oldest capped player Alec Coxon died peacefully four days after his 90th birthday, some four decades after his turbulent career had ended and less than 24 hours after he had emptied his glass and bade farewell to his friends. So, contrary to myth, he was not indestructible.Tall, lean and decidedly mean, he was a splendid fast-medium bowler, as well as a dogged, journeyman batsman and reliable fielder, mostly at slip, and many sound judges thought he was worth more than his solitary Test against the Australians at Lord's in 1948.

John Henry Wardle (1923-1985) Test Cap No:333

© The Cricketer International
Full name John Henry Wardle
Born January 8, 1923, Ardsley, Yorkshire
Died July 23, 1985, Hatfield, Doncaster, Yorkshire (aged 62 years 196 days)
Major teams England, Cambridgeshire, Yorkshire
Batting style Left-hand bat
Bowling style Slow left-arm orthodox, Slow left-arm chinaman

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Left-arm spinner Johnny Wardle shows a young,
 Yorkshire bowler how to grip the ball.
© Getty image
Johnny Wardle was one of the most skilful left-arm spinners the game has seen. Though he usually bowled in the orthodox tradition, as preferred by Yorkshire, he sometimes bowled wrist-spinners (with a bemusing googly - the `chinaman'), especially when on overseas duty for England. It was his misfortune that his career coincided with that of the more aggressive Tony Lock of Surrey, who was preferred to him for many Tests during the 1950s.

Still, Wardle played 28 times for England and took 102 wickets at only 20.39, five times taking five wickets in an innings. His best figures were 7 for 36 (12 for 89 in the match) at Cape Town during the tied 1956-57 series in South Africa, when he took 26 wickets in four Tests at a mere 13.81, missing the last Test through a cartilage operation. On the tour he took 90 wickets at a dozen runs apiece, and caused Jim Laker to remark some years later that Wardle had produced the best displays of spin bowling he had ever seen.Yet he played in only one further Test, at Lord's (where he played seven times), in 1957, against West Indies. A year later he was sacked by Yorkshire, wrote some scathing article for the Daily Mail, and had his invitation to tour Australia withdrawn by MCC.

Stewart Cathie Griffith (1914-1993) Test Cap No:332

.© The Cricketer International
Full name Stewart Cathie Griffith
Born June 16, 1914, Wandsworth, London
Died April 7, 1993, Felpham, Sussex (aged 78 years 295 days)
Major teams England, Cambridge University, Surrey, Sussex
Batting style Right-hand bat
Fielding position Wicketkeeper
Other Administrator

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The first draw for the Gillette Cup at Lord's, 1963.
Billy Griffith (left), Donald Carr and J Dunbar officiate.
© The Cricketer International
Stewart Cathie Griffith, CBE, DFC, TD, died aged 78 in a nursing home at Felpham in Sussex on April 7, 1993, after a long and trying illness. Batting as a makeshift opener in the Port-of-Spain Test of 1947-48, Billy Griffith became the first man to score his maiden first-class century for England and the only man to do so on debut. Later, he became secretary of MCC and guided the club from 1962 to 1974, during which time the club's role and the game itself changed profoundly. At Dulwich, in spite of making more than 1,200 runs during four years in the XI, Griffith lived in the shadow of his friend Hugh Bartlett, whose scoring was phenomenal. However, when he took up wicket-keeping, he found an identity of his own. He won his Blue in his second year at Cambridge, 1935. It is a long time since Cambridge had a better wicket-keeper, said Wisden.

He toured Australia and New Zealand with a young MCC team under Errol Holmes in 1935-36, but lost his Cambridge place the following year to Paul Gibb. Griffith returned to Dulwich as cricket master, moved from Surrey (for whom he had played once) to Sussex and became first-choice keeper in 1939. He had a heroic war as an officer in the Glider Pilot Regiment, along with Bartlett. As second-in-command he carried the commander of the 6th Airborne Division, Major-General Windy Gale, into Normandy, crash-landing after being caught in a storm.

Maurice Fletcher Tremlett (1923-1984) Test Cap No:331

© Wisden Cricket Monthly
Full name Maurice Fletcher Tremlett
Born July 5, 1923, Stockport, Cheshire
Died July 30, 1984, Southampton, Hampshire (aged 61 years 25 days)
Major teams England, Central Districts, Somerset
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast-medium

Profile
© Mike Atelski
Maurice Tremlett, who died in a Southampton hospital on July 30 at the age of 61, was Somerset's first professional captain (1956-59) and, it could be argued, the best they ever had. Despite that almost languid, easy-going persona, his cricketing mind was sharp and unwavering. His tactical sense was intuitive, unconsciously backed by a rare, accumulated knowledge of the technical flaws of most of the opponents he was likely to meet.He was born in Stockport but was as Somerset in approach as Bicknoller's Harold Gimblett, who was at times a little wary, even jealous some implied, of Tremlett's glamorous reputation as a hitter and pilferer of headlines from the county's marvellous opening batsman. In fact, they had much in common, even if the younger man never really acquired the skills and refinements of Gimblett. But they both agonised.When Tremlett suddenly lost everything as a bowler -- rhythm, line, length and, of course, confidence -- he visibly despaired. He was still impressive fast-medium in the nets; on the field he was an embarrassing wreck. He was desperately depressed, and insensitive bellows from the boundary from those who didn't understand his psycho-logical battle compounded the misery.

Gerald Arthur Smithson (1926-1970) Test Cap No:330

Geoffrey Keighley and Gerald Smithson.
© Getty image
Full name Gerald Arthur Smithson
Born November 1, 1926, Spofforth, Yorkshire
Died September 6, 1970, Abingdon, Berkshire (aged 43 years 309 days)
Major teams England, Leicestershire, Yorkshire
Batting style Left-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium

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Gerald Arthur Smithson, who died suddenly on September 6, aged 43, played for Yorkshire in 1946 and 1947, his highest innings for the county being 169 against Leicestershire at Leicester in the second year. Conscripted as a Bevin Boy in the mines after the war, he received special permission, after his case had been debated in the House of Commons, to tour the West Indies with the MCC team of 1947--48, taking part in two Test matches.His picture appeared in Wisden 1948, page 38. In 1951 he joined Leicestershire, with whom he remained for six seasons, of which his best was that of 1952 when, by attractive left-hand batting and the aid of two centuries, he hit 1,264 runs, average 28.08. He afterwards served as coach, first at Caterham School and then at Abingdon School, and between 1957 and 1962 he also assisted Hertfordshire.

Test debut West Indies v England at Bridgetown, Jan 21-26, 1948
Last Test West Indies v England at Port of Spain, Feb 11-16, 1948
First-class span 1946-1956

Winston Place (1914-2002) Test Cap No:329

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Full name Winston Place
Born December 7, 1914, Rawtenstall, Lancashire
Died January 25, 2002, Burnley, Lancashire (aged 87 years 49 days)
Major teams England, Lancashire
Batting style Right-hand bat

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Winston & Washbrook open for Lancashire.
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Place, Winston, died in Burnley on January 25, 2002, seven weeks after his 87th birthday. He had been the second-oldest surviving England cricketer, having played three Tests on MCC's ill-planned tour of the West Indies in 1947-48. But it was his opening partnerships for Lancashire with Cyril Washbrook, in the seasons immediately after World War II, for which he was most fondly remembered. In their contrasting ways - Washbrook the flamboyant, consummate strokemaker; Place, taller and unassuming, reminiscent of Harry Makepeace in his studied defensive play - they provided a foundation that was the envy of other counties. Not that Place was dilatory or dull. He often outscored his partner on poor wickets and, by the time he left Old Trafford in 1955, he was Lancashire's 13th-highest runmaker with 14,605 runs at 36.69 for the county. Decisive footwork determined his game: he drove effectively through the off-side arc and at times back over the bowler's head, played the late-cut with a delicate touch, and pulled with real aplomb.

James Charles Laker (1922-1986) Test Cap No:328

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Full name James Charles Laker
Born February 9, 1922, Frizinghall, Bradford, Yorkshire
Died April 23, 1986, Putney, London (aged 64 years 73 days)
Major teams England, Auckland, Essex, Surrey
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm offbreak

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Ian Craig is trapped lbw by
 Jim Laker in the second innings.
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Jim Laker will always be remembered for his bowling in the Test match at Old Trafford in 1956, when he took 19 Australian wickets for 90, 9 for 37 in the first innings and 10 for 53 in the second. No other bowler has taken more than seventeen wickets in a first-class match, let alone in a Test match. The feat is unique and, rash though it may seem to say, may well remain so. Ten wickets in an innings, more than any other achievement in cricket, must contain a large element of luck: however well a man bowls, the odds must always be that his partner will pick up a wicket. In this case these odds were heavier than usual because Lock at the other end was, on such a wicket, as great a spinner as Laker and bowled superbly. What turned the scale was that Laker was bowling off-breaks whereas Lock relied on the left-armer's natural leg-break, and the Australians at that period were wholly inexperienced in playing off-breaks, especially on a wicket which, heavily marled and almost devoid of grass, might have been designed for an off-spinner.

Laker, James Charles (JIM), who died at Putney on April 23, 1986, aged 64, will always be remembered for his bowling in the Test match at Old Trafford in 1956, when he took nineteen Australian wickets for 90, nine for 37 in the first innings and ten for 53 in the second. No other bowler has taken more than seventeen wickets in a first-class match, let alone in a Test match. The feat is unique and, rash though it may seem to say, may well remain so. Ten wickets in an innings, more than any other achievement in cricket, must contain a large element of luck: however well a man bowls, the odds must always be that his partner will pick up a wicket. In this case these odds were heavier than usual because Lock at the other end was, on such a wicket, as great a spinner as Laker and bowled superbly. What turned the scale was that Laker was bowling off-breaks whereas Lock relied on the left-armer's natural leg-break, and the Australians at that period were wholly inexperienced in playing off-breaks, especially on a wicket which, heavily marled and almost devoid of grass, might have been designed for an off-spinner.

Dennis Brookes (1915-2006) Test Cap No:327

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Full name Dennis Brookes
Born October 29, 1915, Kippax, Leeds, Yorkshire
Died March 9, 2006, Northampton (aged 90 years 131 days)
Major teams England, Northamptonshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium
Other Coach, Administrator

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Future generations, accustomed to players pocketing a gold watch and parchment scroll after three years' loyal service to the same county cricket company, may not know what to make of Dennis Brookes. The quietly spoken, unostentatious Yorkshireman joined Northamptonshire as a teenager in 1933 and remained closely associated with the club for the rest of his long life. A special dinner to mark the 70th anniversary of his first trial match packed out Northampton's new Indoor School in July 2002, the guests passing through the Abington Avenue gates that bear his name.

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Between 1934 - when Hedley Verity trapped him for a single "playing back when I should have been forward" on his Championship debut at Bradford - and 1959 Brookes scored 28,980 first-class runs and 67 centuries in 492 matches for Northamptonshire, reaching 1,000 runs in a season 17 times and 2,000 on six occasions, all county records. The consummate batting craftsman, he gained high marks for artistic impression as well as technical merit; his former opening partner Peter Arnold reckons Brookes "the most graceful player you could find anywhere" while Frank Tyson relished his old skipper's "silky drives and subtle deflections". After that initial setback against Verity he attained grandmaster status when it came to handling spin and always rated an innings of 102 out of 185 against Kent's Doug Wright on a turning Northampton pitch in 1952 as his best ever.

John David Benbow Robertson (1917-1996) Test Cap No:326

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Full name John David Benbow Robertson
Born February 22, 1917, Chiswick, Middlesex
Died October 12, 1996, Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk (aged 79 years 233 days)
Major teams England, Middlesex
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm offbreak
Other Coach

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Polished and stylish, wristy and effortless: these were the words used time and again to describe innings played by Jack Robertson during his seasons with Middlesex. And at Test level, no more elegant pair than Len Hutton and Robertson ever opened England's batting. Unfortunately for the Southerner, and for impartial spectators, Hutton and Robertson opened together in only three Tests - two in West Indies in 1947-48, and at Lord's in 1949- because Lancashire's Washbrook was invariably seen as slightly superior against fast bowling.This led to the absurdity of Robertson's omission after scoring 121 against New Zealand in that Lord's Test (143 with Hutton for the first wicket), because the injured Washbrook recovered in time for the next Test. So Robertson had the rare distinction of a century in his final home Test: to which he added two half-centuries at Madras in his last England appearance, on the 1951-52 tour of India.

Richard Howorth (1909-1980) Test Cap No:325

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Full name Richard Howorth
Born April 26, 1909, Bacup, Lancashire
Died April 2, 1980, Worcester (aged 70 years 342 days)
Major teams England, Europeans (India), Worcestershire
Batting style Left-hand bat
Bowling style Slow left-arm orthodox

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Dick Howorth was a slow left-arm bowler, who kept an immaculate length and could spin and flight the ball, an attacking left-handed batsman, who usually appeared in the middle of the order but was prepared to open if wanted, and a good field close to the wicket, he did great service for Worcestershire from 1933 to 1951, scoring for them 10,538 runs at an average of 20.20 taking 1,274 wickets at 21.36 and holding 188 catches. Three times, in 1939, 1946 and 1947 he achieved the double in all matches, and he played five times for England. Born at Bacup, he appeared for Worcestershire in 1933, against the West Indians while qualifying and in the first innings was top scorer with 68. Qualified in 1934,

John Albert Young (1912-1993) Test Cap No:324

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Full name John Albert Young
Born October 14, 1912, Paddington, London
Died February 5, 1993, St John's Wood, London (aged 80 years 114 days)
Major teams England, Middlesex
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Slow left-arm orthodox

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The former Middlesex and England slow left-arm bowler Jack Young died at his St John's Wood home, within sight and sound of Lord's, on Feb 5. He was 80.John Albert Young, a short man with a low delivery not unlike Norman Gifford's of more recent vintage, joined the Lord's groundstaff and played occasionally for Middlesex before the Second World War, with little success. By 1945, though, he had improved, and took 8 for 71 against the RAF and 6 for 33 against the Army while guesting for Glamorgan.Back at Lord's in 1946 he immediately became an integral part of the powerful Middlesex side which was to win the Championship in 1947 and share it in 1949. Displaying what Wisden called `wholehearted endeavour', Young took 122 wickets (16.68) in 1946, his first full season, and a return of 8 for 31 against Yorkshire (following 4 for 41 in the first innings) won him his county cap. He showed his liking for the northern county's batsmen again later that season with 8 for 33 for MCC against Yorkshire (83 all out) in the Scarborough Festival. A hat-trick came his way at Northampton, but this achievement was dwarfed by Bill Edrich's allround efforts: he followed up an innings of 222 not out with 7 for 69 in Northants' first innings.