Thursday, March 10

Frederick Richard Brown (1910-1991) Test Cap No:261

© ESPNcricinfo Ltd
Full name Frederick Richard Brown
Born December 16, 1910, Lima, Peru
Died July 24, 1991, Ramsbury, Wiltshire (aged 80 years 220 days)
Major teams England, Cambridge University, Northamptonshire, Surrey
Playing role Allrounder
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium, Legbreak googly
Other Administrator

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kiwi captain W. Hadlee watches as England
captain Brown toss the coin © Getty Image 
Frederick Richard Brown, CBE, who died on July 24, 1991, aged 80, was all-rounder of exceptional skill and achievement who will always be remembered for the courage and determination of his leadership of England in the 1950-51 Test series in Australia. Few visiting captains have been received with so much acclaim by the crowds of Melbourne and Sydney. Although England lost the series by four matches to one, it was soon appreciated that the 40-year-old Brown had almost single-handedly, and against every forecast, done a huge amount to revitalise English cricket, which had been humbled in turn by Australian speed and West Indian spin. What is in many ways a romantic story started when Brown was offered the captaincy of Northamptonshire early in 1949.

© ESPNcricinfo Ltd
He called his new charges back for three weeks training before the season began and went on to lead them to sixth place in the Championship--after two years at the bottom of the table. In addition, he was invited to captain England in the last two Tests against New Zealand and, crucially, a year later, the Gentleman at Lord's. A sudden first-innings collapse, the presence of the selectors, and his sense of the occasion put Brown on his mettle. In a wonderful innings of 122, made in 110 minutes, he hit a six and sixteen fours, scoring all but 9 of the runs put on while he was at the wicket. The selectors had no need to look further for the man they wanted in Australia, and he was recalled to lead England at the Oval in the last Test against West Indies.Indifferent form against the states did little to suggest that England would make a fight of it in the Tests; but they defied the critics by bowling out Australia for 228 on the opening day of the First Test at Brisbane. Although torrential overnight rain subsequently turned a losing score into a winning one, it was generally felt that England were superbly led and had played the better cricket.

Alfred Harry Bakewell (1908-1983) Test Cap No:260

Full name Alfred Harry Bakewell
Born November 2, 1908, Walsall, Staffordshire
Died January 23, 1983, Westbourne, Dorset (aged 74 years 82 days)
Major teams England, Northamptonshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium

Profile
Alfred Harry Fred Bakewell, who died at Westbourne, Bournemouth, on January 23, 1983, aged 74, was, from the spectator's point of view, one of the most exciting batsmen of his generation and the car smash which ended his career was as disastrous as that which finished Milburn's years later. While, as the vicissitudes of some of our modern Test match batsmen demonstrate, it is impossible to exaggerate the importance of a sound orthodox method, it is salutary that just now and again a player emerges who can defy some of what are normally considered the cardinal principles and yet completely confound the critics. Bakewell's stance was one of the most two-eyed ever seen, with the right shoulder so far round that it seemed almost to be facing mid-on: it was not helped by a slight crouch and he gripped the bat throughout with one hand at the top and the other at the bottom of the handle. Seeing this for the first time, one would have diagnosed a dull and ugly player who would score, if at all, by nudges and deflections. Yet there was in him some natural genius which enabled him to be one of the most brilliant drivers and cutters in the world, nor did he have any difficulty in getting right down the pitch to hit the ball. Naturally he was also strong on the leg side and, if in his early years his defence was a trifle suspect, especially on his off stump, he soon improved it.

John Arnold (1907-1984) Test Cap No:259

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Full name John Arnold
Born November 30, 1907, Cowley, Oxford
Died April 4, 1984, Southampton, Hampshire (aged 76 years 126 days)
Major teams England, Hampshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm slow

Profile
A Hampshire stalwart for over 18 years, John Arnold played a single Test for England early in his career. In 1931 he was selected to open the batting against New Zealand in just his second full season in the absence of Hobbs and Sutcliffe, but a modest performance led to a return to the county ranks. Arnold usually opened, but often dropped down the order for Hampshire, and was by nature an aggressive bat, particularly strong on the leg side, but also a good driver. He represented his country in soccer, and used his speed to good effect in the field. The vagaries of form led him to adopt a more defensive approach in the middle part of his career, but after a break for the Second World War he reverted to his former style with considerable success. Originally from Oxford he moved to Hampshire, and after qualification rarely was out of the county side. He made over 21,000 runs and 37 centuries for the county until retirement was forced upon him by illness. He later became a first-class umpire

Henry William Lee (1890-1981) Test Cap No:258

© The Cricketer International
Full name Henry William Lee
Born October 26, 1890, Marylebone, London
Died April 21, 1981, Westminster, London (aged 90 years 177 days)
Major teams England, Maharaja of Cooch-Behar's XI, Middlesex
Batting style Right-hand bat
Other Umpire, Coach

Profile
HL Dales and HW Lee open the
innings © The Cricketer International
The eldest of the three Lee brothers, Harry William Lee, who died in Middlesex Hospital on April 21, was the second-oldest surviving England cricketer at the time of his death. At 90, he was 112 days younger than Andrew Sandham. Lee was also the last of the famous 1920 Middlesex team which won the Championship with a thrilling victory over Surrey at Lord's. Lee and his partner C.K.L. Skeet made centuries in an opening stand of 208 in the second innings, Sandham scoring 167 not out for the losers. Born in Marylebone on October 26, 1890, and proud to be one of the relatively few Middlesex players over the years to have been born in the district, Lee learnt the game in the street, a lamp-post serving as the wicket. Although he continued to help his father, who was a greengrocer and coal merchant, young Harry, inevitably known as 'Ginger' for the colouring of his hair, joined the ground staff at Lord's in 1906, and, having absorbed advice from E.G. Wynyard and others, he developed his allround play to such an extent that Middlesex offered him an engagement in 1911.Three years passed before he made any true impression. This was a fortnight after war had broken out, in August 1914. Promoted to open, he accompanied the brilliant Frank Tarrant to the middle and scored 139. Pasty Hendren and J.W. Hearne also made centuries in that match against Notts, a pointer to the future, for the pair were to bring repeated glories to Middlesex batting, with Lee a valuable regular support. It was a minor miracle that Lee was able to resume cricket at all. Soon after enlisting, he was shot in the leg during the hostilities at Neuve Chapelle and lay for three days between the lines.

William Farrimond (1903-1979) Test Cap No:257

Full name William Farrimond
Born May 23, 1903, Daisy Hill, Lancashire
Died November 15, 1979, Westhoughton, Bolton, Lancashire (aged 76 years 176 days)
Major teams England, Lancashire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Fielding position Wicketkeeper

Profile
William Farrimond, who died at home at Westhoughton, near Bolton, on November 14, 1979, aged 76, had the rare experience of being an England wicket-keeper who had been playing for fourteen years for his county before getting a regular place in the side. This was the more exasperating as for 35 years Lancashire had hardly had a reliable professional'keeper, merely a succession of men who had to give way when a competent amateur was available. In 1923 they found that great'keeper, Duckworth, and in 1924 Farrimond appeared. It was only Duckworth's premature retirement at the end of 1937 that gave him an assured place, and after two seasons his career was ended by the war. It speaks volumes for Farrimond's loyalty that during this long period he never accepted any of the offers he received to qualify for another county.

Thomas William John Goddard (1900-1966) Test Cap No:256

© Martin Williamson
Full name Thomas William John Goddard
Born October 1, 1900, Gloucester
Died May 22, 1966, Gloucester (aged 65 years 233 days)
Major teams England, Gloucestershire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm offbreak

Profile
 Goddard bowls for G.shire © PA Photos
Tom Goddard, who died at his home in Gloucester on May 22, aged 65, was one of the greatest off-break bowlers the game has known. A big man, standing six feet three, with massive hands, he spun the ball to a remarkable degree and on a helpful pitch was almost unplayable. He bowled mostly from round the wicket and had such a command of length and flight that even on easy surfaces he kept batsmen apprehensive. His height enabled him to make the ball lift more than most spinners and the Gloucestershire combination of Goddard and the slow left-hander, Charlie Parker, was probably the most feared in Championship cricket.

The early days of Goddard's career gave no hint of the success he was later to achieve. Born on October 1, 1900, he first played for Gloucestershire in 1922 as a fast bowler. Despite his strong physique he made little progress and in six years took only 153 wickets at a cost of 34 runs each.

At the end of the 1927 season he left the county and joined the M.C.C. ground staff at Lord's. There he decided to experiment with off-breaks and his long, strong fingers were ideally suited to this type of bowling. Beverley Lyon, the Gloucestershire captain, saw him in the nets at Lord's and, immediately struck by Goddard's new-found ability, persuaded Gloucestershire to re-engage him. The effect was immediate and dramatic. In 1929 Goddard took 184 wickets at 16 runs apiece and he never looked back.

George Oswald Browning Allen (1902-1989) Test Cap No:255

© The Cricketer International
Full name George Oswald Browning Allen
Born July 31, 1902, Bellevue Hill, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Died November 29, 1989, St John's Wood, London (aged 87 years 121 days)
Major teams England, Cambridge University, Middlesex
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast

Profile
© The Cricketer International
© The Cricketer International
Sir George `Gubby' Allen died at his London home overlooking Lord's during the night of November 29. He had been in poor health for some time after a major stomach operation during the summer. He was 87.

Sir George Oswald Browning Allen - known to almost 70 years of cricketers across the world as `Gubby'- has died, at the ripe age of 87; indeed he was taking his regular game of golf as lately as last June. He was brought to England at the age six after having been born in Australia, where his family for long practiced law; indeed, his uncle, Reginald Charles Allen, played for Australia in a Test Match against England in 1886-87. As an active cricketer `Gubby' was a genuine and considerable allrounder; Remarkably for one of his relatively slight build, he was a genuinely fast bowler, whose sharpest weapon was the outswinger; a correct, of the tenacious batsman, and a sure-handed close field. He played for Eton- where he was coached by George Hirst and C. M. `Father' Wells- Cambridge University, Middlesex and England. His county career lasted from 1921 to 1950, but he was outstandingly active in the councils of the game until virtually the end.

© The Cricketer International
Sir George lived for much of his life in a house only a wall's thickness away from Lord's (he had his own private gate into the ground), whence he wielded immensely powerful influence in the affairs, especially, of MCC and Middlesex. He was a genuine amateur, prevented by his career in business and on the Stock Exchange from playing fulltime cricket. For that reason, capable allrounder that he was, he never scored 1000 runs nor took 100 wickets in a season. Indeed, in his entire career he played only 376 innings; notably, 33 of them were in his 25 Test for England; his batting average overall was 28.67, while he took 788 wickets (81 in Test) at 22.23. Somewhat surprisingly for one who lived to such a good age, from his Eton days he was dogged by injuries; in later life he needed six hip operations - three on each side.

He was `blooded' in Test cricket against Australia in 1930 but, although he scored 57, his bowling was unsuccessful and he was dropped for the remainder of the series. He made his mark, though, in 1931, with a quite remarkable innings of 122 against New Zealand at Lord's, coming in at No. 9. He And Leslie Ames set a Test record, which still Stands, with their partnership of 246 for the eighth wicket. In the next match of the series he took 5 for 14; he did not need to bat in that Test, nor in the third.

He was taken in Douglas Jardine's side for what has become known as the Bodyline series. Allen, however, disagreed with that version of leg-theory and his captain, meeting a character as determined as his own, did not press his only amateur fast bowler. However, Allen took 21 wickets in that Test series- more than any other English bowler except Harold Larwood. Back home again in 1933, business claimed him for all but one Test against West Indies. Then, in the following season, 1934, the after-effects of a hernia operation restricted him to two Test, in which he made useful but unremarkable contributions. At Old Trafford, in his attempts to avoid the pit dug by Bill O'Reilly's followthrough, Allen bowled a most remarkable first over of 13 deliveries, which included four no-balls three wides - and two unaccepted chances of catches.

Gubby Allen at this age of 45, just prior to captaining England in West Indies. Allen led England in 11 of his 25 Tests, before retiring to even greater influence behind the scenes in the MCC committee-room,He was captain against India in 1936 When England took the three-match rubber by two to one, and his opponent, the Maharaj Kumar of Vizianagram, was Knighted between the first two Tests.

Test debut England v Australia at Lord's, Jun 27-Jul 1, 1930
Last Test West Indies v England at Kingston, Mar 27-Apr 1, 1948
First-class span 1921-1950

Leslie Fletcher Townsend (1903-1993) Test Cap No:254

Full name Leslie Fletcher Townsend
Born June 8, 1903, Long Eaton, Derbyshire
Died February 17, 1993, Richmond, Nelson, New Zealand (aged 89 years 254 days)
Major teams England, Auckland, Derbyshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium, Right-arm offbreak

Profile
Leslie Fletcher Townsend, one of the best all-round cricketers to appear for Derbyshire, was born at Long Eaton on June 8, 1903, so that his most successful season--that of last summer--came to him rather later in life than it does to the average first-class player in modern days. Curiously enough, he did not play any cricket when as a boy he attended the local Council School, but he was always a faithful attendant at the matches in which his local club engaged and, living as he did not seven miles from Trent Bridge, he took every opportunity possible to watch county matches on that enclosure.

William Voce (1909-1984) Test Cap No:253

© Getty image
Full name William Voce
Born August 8, 1909, Annesley Woodhouse, Nottinghamshire
Died June 6, 1984, Lenton, Nottinghamshire (aged 74 years 303 days)
Major teams England, Nottinghamshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Left-arm fast-medium

Profile
Bill Voce bowling for
 Nottinghamshire in 1934
© The Cricketer International
Bill Voce, who died at Nottingham on June 6, 1984, aged 74, is largely thought of in these days as the junior in one of the great bowling partnerships, Larwood and Voce, and for the contribution that he made to the bodyline attack in Australia in 1932-33. Although he was somewhat slower than Larwood, his line, from left-arm over the wicket, and the steeper bounce that he obtained from his height, made him formidable enough and the batsmen got no relief when facing him. His job in that 1932-33 series was to maintain the pressure and he did it nobly, taking, besides, fifteen wickets in four matches: he missed the fourth Test owing to injury. The controversy which this tour excited and the amount that has been written since has diverted attention from his performances in the first two Tests in 1936-37.

No English side in this century had had such a bad press before the tour started: it was popularly regarded as having no chance whatever. Its captain, G. O. Allen, the third fast bowler on the previous trip, had been irredeemably opposed to bodyline and had refused to bowl it: it is worth recording that he himself had by orthodox methods taken eight for 131 in the third Test. So before the selection of the team was completed the Chairman arranged a meeting between Allen and Voce at which Allen insisted on an undertaking being given that bodyline tactics would not be employed. Voce demurred at first, but finally agreed to fall in with his captain's wishes and throughout the tour bowled over the wicket to an off-side field. In the first Test he took six for 41 and four for 16: Australia lost by 322 runs and the critics were confounded. The second was even more sensational.
Stan McCabe cuts inches wide of Bill Voce on his way to a brilliant 187
not out © The Cricketer International
 Allen declared (a step almost unprecedented in a timeless Test) at 426 for six in order to get Australia in on a wet wicket, and with the seventh ball of the first over Voce had O'Brien, a left-hander, caught at slip: from the next ball Bradman was caught at short-leg. A maiden followed and off the second ball of his next over McCabe was caught. Australia were three wickets down for 1 run and Voce had taken them all in four balls. The side was out for 80 and, though they got 324 in their second innings, they lost by an innings, Voce's figures being four for 10 and three for 66. In addition Chipperfield had been missed off his bowling in the first innings. In this match the weather had helped England, in the next it helped Australia, who won by 365 runs. Voce was in no way to blame: though his six wickets cost him 169 runs, he maintained, according to Wisden, his concentration and deadliness right throughout both innings.

Frederick Somerset Gough Calthorpe (1892-1935) Test Cap No:252

Full name Frederick Somerset Gough Calthorpe
Born May 27, 1892, Kensington, London
Died November 19, 1935, The Home Green, Worplesdon, Surrey (aged 43 years 176 days)
Major teams England, Cambridge University, Sussex, Warwickshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium

Profile
The Hon Freddie Calthorpe died on November 19 aged 43 after about a month's illness from which recovery was impossible. Born on May 27, 1892, he was one of the best all-round players of his time at Repton, being described in 1911 as the backbone of a strong side's bowling. Going up to Jesus College, Cambridge, he obtained his Blue as a Freshman and remained in the side for the following two seasons.During the War he served in the Royal Air Force and would have captained Cambridge in 1919 had not the letter of invitation miscarried. As it was, he played under J. S. F. Morrison in his fourth University match which Oxford won by 45 runs. The game revived the best traditions of cricket at Lord's which during the preceding four summers had been given over in various ways to the amelioration of War service.

Thomas Stanley Worthington (1905-1973) Test Cap No:251

© The Cricketer International
Full name Thomas Stanley Worthington
Born August 21, 1905, Bolsover, Derbyshire
Died August 31, 1973, King's Lynn, Norfolk (aged 68 years 10 days)
Major teams England, Derbyshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast-medium
Other Coach

Profile
Stan Worthington topples onto his stumps after pulling
Chuck Fleetwood-Smith © ESPNcricinfo Ltd
Thomas Stanley Worthington, who died in hospital on September 1, aged 68, while on holiday at King"s Lynn, was a fine all-rounder for Derbyshire between 1924 and 1947. He took part in nine Test matches for England, five of them when a member of G. O. Allen"s team in Australia in 1936-37. He distinguished himself at the Oval in 1936 when scoring 128, he and W. R. Hammond (217) adding 266 and setting up a fourth wicket record against India which still stands.

During his career, Stan Worthington, as he was always known, scored as a firm-hitting right-handed batsman, 19,221 runs, average 29.07; hit 31 centuries-two in the same match against Nottinghamshire at Ilkeston in 1938; with bowling of splendid length at above medium pace, took 682 wickets at a cost of 29.22 runs apiece and held 326 catches.Unlike several Derbyshire players of his time, he did not begin his working life as a miner. At the age of 17 he became an electrician with the Bolsover Colliery Company and achieved much success for their cricket club in the Bassetlaw League. He did not play for the county with any regularity till 1926, but soon proved his value.

Maurice Joseph Lawson Turnbull (1906-1944) Test Cap No:250

© ESPNcricinfo Ltd
Full name Maurice Joseph Lawson Turnbull
Born March 16, 1906, Cardiff, Glamorgan, Wales
Died August 5, 1944, near Montchamp, France (aged 38 years 142 days)
Major teams England, Cambridge University, Glamorgan, Wales
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm offbreak

Profile
The cover of a biography of Maurice Turnbull,
(published by Tempus Publishing, Oct 2001)
© Glamorgan County Cricket Club
To Maurice batting was a gay adventure. He was a gifted right-hander who made runs when they were wanted and whose value could not always be assessed on figures. Initially as an on-side player, he developed all the recognised strokes and added some of his own, and he was also a fine short-leg fielder. Always associated in the public minds with Glamorgan, he first appeared for them as a schoolboy in 1924. he captained Cambridge in 1929 and Glamorgan from 1930 until 1939. He passed 1000 runs in a season ten times and three times hit double-centuries, the highest being 233 against Worcestershire at Swansea in 1937, a season in which Glamorgan finished higher than ever before thanks to his bold leadership and devoted example. For ten years he was an outstanding secretary to the club. He toured Australia in 1929-30 and South Africa in 1930-31 and with Maurice Allom wrote a lighthearted account of each tour. At home he represented England against West Indies and India; and he was an English selector in 1938 and 1939. A Major in the Welsh Guards, he was killed in action in Normandy. A brilliant allround sportsman, he also played for Wales at rugby and hockey.

Morris Stanley Nichols (1900-1961) Test Cap No:249

© ESPNcricinfo Ltd
Full name Morris Stanley Nichols
Born October 6, 1900, Stondon Massey, Essex
Died January 26, 1961, Newark, Nottinghamshire (aged 60 years 112 days)
Major teams England, Essex
Batting style Left-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast

Profile
Morris Stanley Nichols, who died on January 26, aged 60, was, in an era of a good many all-rounders, one of the best. An Essex player from 1924 to 1939, he scored 17,789 runs, average 26.39, as a left-handed batsman strong in strokes in front of the wicket and with right-arm fast bowling took 1,834 wickets for 21.66 runs apiece. Of his 20 centuries the highest was 205 against Hampshire at Southend in 1936. He was first recommended to Essex solely as a batsman, but Percy Perrin, observing his height and strong physique, encouraged him as a pace bowler. How successful this proved is shown by the fact that in each of eleven seasons Stan Nichols dismissed over 100 batsmen, his best being that of 1938 when he took 171 wickets at a cost of 19.92 runs each. He could bowl for long spells without fatigue or loss of accuracy.

He enjoyed perhaps his greatest triumph as an all-rounder in 1935 when at Huddersfield he played the leading part in the overthrow by an innings and 204 runs of Yorkshire, the ultimate Champions, whose one defeat in the competition this was. In the two innings he gained an analysis of 11 wickets for 54 runs and he hit 146. Three years later at Gloucester, he played an innings of 159 and gained full bowling figures of 15 wickets for 165 runs, his first-innings analysis being nine wickets for 37 runs in 15.2 overs. On three other occasions he took nine wickets in an innings--for 59 runs v. Hampshire at Chelmsford in 1927; for 32 runs v. Nottinghamshire at Trent Bridge in 1936 and for 116 runs v. Middlesex at Leyton in 1930. Twice he disposed of four batsmen in four deliveries--v. Sussex at Horsham in 1929 and v. Lancashire at Chelmsford in 1935--and he also achieved the hat-trick against Yorkshire at Leeds in 1931.

Alfred Herbert Harold Gilligan (1896-1978) Test Cap No:248

Full name Alfred Herbert Harold Gilligan
Born June 29, 1896, Denmark Hill, London
Died May 5, 1978, Stroud Common, Shamley Green, Surrey (aged 81 years 310 days)
Major teams England, Sussex
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak
Relation Brother - FW Gilligan, Brother - AER Gilligan, Son-in-law - PBH May

Profile
Harold Gilligan was the youngest of three brothers all of whom played first-class cricket. Although Frank, the eldest, played for Essex before emigrating to New Zealand, the name of Gilligan became synonymous with Sussex cricket for a decade and more following the First World War (during which Harold was awarded the AFC).Alfred Herbert Harold Gilligan played regularly from 1919 until 1930 and in his last year he captained the Sussex side. In the winter of 1929-30 he captained the MCC team which toured New Zealand and which played the first official Test matches against that country. He proved himself not only an astute captain but also a diplomat of considerable ability. His charming and likeable personality was, in large measure, responsible for this tour being remembered to this day with affection by many New Zealanders.After the last War his interest in cricket moved to The Oval and the Surrey club. Here he served with distinction as a member of the committee. For a time he was the club's honorary treasurer and at the time of his death was a vice-president of the club. He also served for a number of years on the cricket sub-committee of MCC.

Harold was, like his brother Arthur, an all-round sportsman, a keen golfer and an ardent skier. He was a man of integrity, one who was never afraid to speak his mind yet always appreciating the other man's point of view.To one like myself, who had known him for so many years, he never changed and remained a stalwart friend, always ready to give help and advice, when asked to do so, or to welcome one into his hospitable and charming home. The warmth of his personality created for him a wide circle of friends who will remember him with great affection.

Test debut New Zealand v England at Christchurch, Jan 10-13, 1930
Last Test New Zealand v England at Auckland, Feb 21-24, 1930
First-class span 1919-1931

Walter Latter Cornford (1900-1964) Test Cap No:247

© sportspages.com
Full name Walter Latter Cornford
Born December 25, 1900, Hurst Green, Sussex
Died February 6, 1964, Elm Grove, Brighton, Sussex (aged 63 years 43 days)
Major teams England, Sussex
Batting style Right-hand bat
Fielding position Wicketkeeper

Profile
Walter Latter Tich Cornford, who died in a Brighton hospital on February 6, aged 63, was one of the smallest wicketkeepers to play in first-class cricket, for he stood not much more than five feet. Born on Christmas Day, 1900, he was a regular professional for Sussex from 1921 till 1939 and was recalled in an emergency to play against Essex at Brentwood in 1947 when coach at Brighton College. In all, he helped to dismiss 953 batsmen for his county--639 caught and 314 stumped--and he scored 6,327 runs, average 14.61. His highest innings was 82 against Yorkshire at Eastbourne in 1928, when, sharing in partnerships of 83 with James Langridge and 111 with K. S. Duleepsinhji, he enabled Sussex to save the game after following on 298 behind.

Maurice James Carrick Allom (1906-1995) Test Cap No:246

© The Cricketer International
Full name Maurice James Carrick Allom
Born March 23, 1906, Northwood, Middlesex
Died April 8, 1995, Dene Park, Shipbourne, Tinbridge, Kent (aged 89 years 16 days)
Major teams England, Cambridge University, Surrey
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium-fast
Other Administrator

Profile
With one sensational over at Lancaster Park, Christchurch in Jan 1930, Maurice Allom joined the immortals. England, led by Harold Gilligan (while another England team played Tests in West Indies that extraordinary winter), were playing in New Zealand in that country's inaugural Test, and Allom, the tall, strongly-built Cambridge and Surrey amateur, aged 23, was on Test debut.

His eighth over saw Roger Blunt narrowly escape being lbw to the first ball (a leg-bye was taken); Stewart Dempster was bowled by the next; Tom Lowry, the large Kiwi skipper, played and missed at the third ball and was lbw to the fourth; Ken James was caught by wicketkeeper Tich Cornford, standing up at the stumps; and the sixth ball bowled Ted Badcock, giving Allom a hat-trick and four wickets in five balls.New Zealand, now 21 for 7, recovered to 112 but lost in just under two playing days, and Allom was aglow after taking 5 for 38 and 3 for 17, including the 10th hat-trick in Test history, which was watched by Hugh Trumble, then 62, who had taken two hat-tricks for Australia early this century.

Edward Winchester Clark (1902-1982) Test Cap No:245

Full name Edward Winchester Clark
Born August 9, 1902, Elton, Huntingdonshire
Died April 28, 1982, West Winch, King's Lynn, Norfolk (aged 79 years 262 days)
Major teams England, Northamptonshire
Batting style Left-hand bat
Bowling style Left-arm fast

Profile
Edward Winchester Clark, inevitably known as Nobby, who died on April 28, 1982, near King's Lynn, aged 79, possessed every qualification of a great bowler except temperament. With a lovely loose left arm, which almost brushed his ear as it came over, he had a classic action, his right shoulder pointing straight at the batsman. He was at his best really fast and, though he was well capable of bowling, like Voce, to a leg-side field, was probably most effective round the wicket when the ball, swinging in and breaking away, would produce catches in the slips if the batsman was good enough to touch it. But he was a perfectionist and anything outside his control which interfered with that perfection - a dropped catch, an insecure foothold, a tactless word from his captain or one of his companions - was quite sufficient to put him off. It was his misfortune that his county, Northamptonshire, was throughout his career one of the weakest sides that has ever played in the Championship: not only did he have to do more than his fair share of bowling, but perhaps no fast bowler since Buckenham of Essex had so many chances dropped off him.

Leslie Ethelbert George Ames (1905-1990) Test Cap No:244

© Wisden Cricket Monthly
Full name Leslie Ethelbert George Ames
Born December 3, 1905, Elham, Kent
Died February 27, 1990, Canterbury, Kent (aged 84 years 86 days)
Major teams England, Kent
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak
Fielding position Wicketkeeper

Profile
The England XII for the Lord's Test of 1932 against India
© ESPNcricinfo Ltd
© The Cricketer International
Leslie Ethelbert George Ames, CBE, who died suddenly at his home in Canterbury on February 26, 1990, aged 84, was without a doubt the greatest wicketkeeper-batsman the game has so far produced; and yet, at the time he was playing, it used to be said there were better wicketkeepers than Ames, and that he was in the England team because of his batting. If this was so, would Jardine, for example, have preferred him to Duckworth in Australia in 1932-33? Surely not. When fully fit, Ames was England's first-choice wicketkeeper from 1931 to 1939, when he virtually gave up the job. For Kent, he was an integral part of their Championship side from 1927 to the first match of 1951, when a sharp recurrence of back trouble, which had dogged him for so long, brought his career to an end while he was actually at the crease. By this time he had amassed 37,248 runs, average 43.51, made 102 hundreds, including nine double-hundreds, and passed 1,000 runs in a season seventeen times, going on to 3,000 once and 2,000 on five occasions. He had had a direct interest in 1,121 dismissals, of which more than 1,000 were effected when he was keeping wicket. His total of 418 stumpings is easily a record.

Fred Barratt (1894-1947) Test Cap No:243

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Full name Fred Barratt
Born April 12, 1894, Annesley, Nottinghamshire
Died January 29, 1947, Standard Hill, Nottingham (aged 52 years 292 days)
Major teams England, Nottinghamshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast

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Fred Barratt, fast bowler and powerful hitter, died in Nottingham General Hospital on January 29, aged 52. Playing first for the county at Lord's in 1914 against M.C.C., he took eight wickets for 91 runs, but did not bowl when the club followed-on 194 behind. He finished that season with 115 wickets at 21.80 runs apiece. After the war he was slow in finding his old form, but in 1923 he dismissed 101 men at an average of 18.54 and also became a very free scorer. In 1928 he did the double with 1,167 runs, average 29.17, and 114 wickets at 25.18 each.The first Nottinghamshire man to accomplish this feat since John Gunn in 1906, he punished all kinds of bowling with great freedom, thanks largely to sure driving.He excelled against Glamorgan at Trent Bridge, hitting up 110 in eighty-five minutes; and at Coventry 139, also not out, off the Warwickshire bowlers. W. Walker helped to add 196 in eighty-five minutes, a short boundary giving Barratt such an opportunity to exercise his strength that he hit seven 6's and eighteen 4's. Nottinghamshire declared with 656 for three wickets, then the highest total for the loss of so few men.

He reached Test honours in 1929 at Old Trafford against South Africa, but did little, two wickets for 38 runs being his reward while men of less pace were supreme. Going on tour with M.C.C. side, captained by A. H. H. Gilligan, in the winter of 1930, Barratt, with nine wickets for 93, helped to beat South Australia by 239 runs, and seven Victoria batsmen fell to him for 105, among his victims being W. H. Ponsford and H. L. Henry, both dismissed very cheaply in each innings. He was not effective in the four Test matches in New Zealand. Altogether in first-class cricket he took 1,126 wickets at 24.27 runs apiece and scored 6,347 runs, average 15.25.

Test debut England v South Africa at Manchester, Jul 27-30, 1929
Last Test New Zealand v England at Auckland, Feb 21-24, 1930
First-class span1914-1931

Edward Henry Bowley (1890-1974) Test Cap No:242

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Full name Edward Henry Bowley
Born June 6, 1890, Leatherhead, Surrey
Died July 9, 1974, Winchester, Hampshire (aged 84 years 33 days)
Major teams England, Auckland, Sussex
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak
Other Coach

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Bowlet,Edward Henry, the Sussex and England cricketer, died in Winchester Hospital on July 9, aged 84. Born at Leatherhead, in Surrey, he learned his early cricket in Liss and Stodham Park, Hampshire, and qualified by residence for Sussex, for whom he made his début in 1912. He became a regular member of the side in 1914 and for fifteen successive seasons (excluding the First World War) he scored at least 1,000 runs. After serving in the Army he returned to Sussex in 1920. A sound and often brilliant opening batsman and a very useful slow right arm leg break bowler, he hit his maiden century that year, 169 against Northamptonshire at Northampton, putting on 385 with Maurice Tate for the second wicket, a Sussex record that still stands.His best year was in 1929 when he made 2,359 runs and took 90 wickets. In 1929 he hit his highest score, 280 not out in a day against Gloucestershire at Hove and with J. H. Parks put on 368 for the first wicket, a record for the county. That was surpassed in 1933 when against Middlesex at Hove with John Langridge he engaged in a stand of 490, also still the best for the county.
A number of great batsmen stood in his way as far as England was concerned, but at the age of 39 he appeared twice for England against South Africa in 1929 before touring New Zealand and Australia with A. H. H. Gilligan's M.C.C. team. He played in three Tests in New Zealand and made 109 in the one at Auckland.

Robert Walter Vivian Robins (1906-1968) Test Cap No:241

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Full name Robert Walter Vivian Robins
Born June 3, 1906, Stafford
Died December 12, 1968, St John's Wood, London (aged 62 years 192 days)
Major teams England, Cambridge University, Middlesex
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak

Profile
Robert Walter Vivian Robins, who died at his home near Lord's on December 12, aged 62, will live in history as one of the most dynamic all-round cricketers of his time. In three of his four years in the XI at Highgate School he headed both batting and bowling averages, being captain in the last, 1925, when, with an innings of 206 and seven wickets for 54 runs against Aldenham his outstanding performance, he scored 816 runs, average 62.76, and dismissed 60 batsmen for 15.18 runs apiece. He also captained the Highgate football XI. In 1925, while still at school, he made his first appearance for Middlesex, for whom he played irregularly till 1950. In all first-class cricket, he hit 13,490 runs, average 26.45, and took 946 wickets at 23.59 runs each--figures which do not convey his true worth.

Jack O'Connor (1897-1977) Test Cap No:240

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Full name Jack O'Connor
Born November 6, 1897, Cambridge
Died February 22, 1977, Buckhurst Hill, Essex (aged 79 years 108 days)
Major teams England, Essex
Batting style Right-hand bat

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Jack O'Connor, who died in the Forest Hospital, Buckhurst Hill on February 22, aged 79, was a very good country cricketer who was for years on the edge of Test cricket. He played once against South Africa in 1929 and that winter took part in three matches for the M.C.C. in the West Indies, which Wisden then called Representative Matches, but which are now included in the Test records, though the English side could not possibly be described as more than England A. After a modest start for Essex in 1921,

Edgar Thomas Killick (1907-1953) Test Cap No:239


Full name Edgar Thomas Killick
Born May 9, 1907, Fulham, London
Died May 18, 1953, Northampton (aged 46 years 9 days)
Major teams England, Cambridge University, Middlesex
Batting style Right-hand bat

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The Reverend Tom Killick, who died while taking part in a cricket match between the diocesan clergy of St. Albans and Coventry at Northampton on May 18, aged 46, played for Cambridge University, Middlesex and England. He first showed his ability as a sportsman while at St. Paul's School, where he won his colours as a Rugby three-quarter and captained the cricket XI. In 1925 his batting average was 104.44, and the following summer he led the Public Schools fifteen against the Australians at Lord's.

Kumar Shri Duleepsinhji (1905-1959) Test Cap No:238

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Full name Kumar Shri Duleepsinhji
Born June 13, 1905, Sarodar, Kathiawar, India
Died December 5, 1959, Bombay (now Mumbai), Maharashtra, India (aged 54 years 175 days)
Major teams England, Cambridge University, Hindus, Sussex
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak

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KS Duleepsinhji bats in the nets
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Kumar Shri Duleepsinhji, who died from a heart attack in Bombay on December 5, 1959, aged 54, was among the best batsmen ever to represent England, and certainly one of the most popular. Ill-health limited his first-class career to eight seasons, but in that time he scored 15,485 runs, including 50 centuries, at an average of 49.95. A remarkably good slip fieldsman, he brought off 256 catches. "Duleep" or "Mr. Smith," as he was affectionately known in cricketing circles, was in the Cheltenham XI from 1921 to 1923, and when captain in the last year headed the batting figures with an average of 52.36, his highest innings being 162. He also met with considerable success as a leg-break bowler, and in 1922 was top of the averages with 50 wickets at 13.66 runs each, but he rarely bowled after leaving school. During this time HS Altham, the present President of MCC, wrote of him in Wisden:

"In natural gifts of eye, wrist and footwork he is certainly blest far above the ordinary measure... there is no doubt about the judgment and certainty with which he takes toll of straight balls of anything but the most immaculate length. His late cutting is quite beautiful and there is a certain ease and maturity about all his batting methods that stamps him as of a different class from the ordinary school batsman." The accuracy of this estimate of his qualities was borne out when in 1925 he went up to Cambridge. He got his Blue as a Freshman, scoring 75 in the University match, and also played against Oxford in 1926 and 1928. Illness kept him out of the side for most of the 1927 season.

Morris Leyland (1900-1967) Test Cap No:237

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Full name Morris Leyland
Born July 20, 1900, New Park, Harrogate, Yorkshire
Died January 1, 1967, Scotton Banks, Harrogate, Yorkshire (aged 66 years 165 days)
Major teams England, Maharaja of Patiala's XI, Yorkshire
Batting style Left-hand bat
Bowling style Slow left-arm orthodox

Profile
The death of an illustrious cricketer is always sad ; it is doubly sad when the one who goes has long stood as a symbol of the game's combined strength and merriment. Maurice Leyland, who died on January 1, aged 66, was exactly as old as this part-worn century and his first-class career embraced the inter-war years in addition to the vital season afterwards. The body of English cricket in those years was built on firm bone and muscle, but, more often than not, Leyland was its spinal column. Your Yorkshire cricketer usually has, and admits to having, certain major qualities: sturdiness, independence and a refusal to consider defeat. Leyland had all these virtues and more; where he differed from many was that his fighting was done not grimly, but with a quizzical smile; the harder the battle, the stouter the resolution and the broader the smile.

Harry Smith (1891-1937) Test Cap No:236

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Full name Harry Smith
Born May 21, 1891, Fishponds, Bristol
Died November 12, 1937, Downend, Bristol (aged 46 years 175 days)
Major teams England, Gloucestershire
Batting style Right-hand bat

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© frenchaymuseumarchives.co.uk
Harry Smith, the Gloucestershire professional, died on November 12, aged 46. He succeeded Jack Board as wicketkeeper in 1914, and did good service until illness checked his career in 1932. After an unexpected return to the side in 1935 he retired and was for a time coach to the county colts. Besides being a reliable wicketkeeper he was a sound batsman and in 1928 played for England against West Indies at Lord's. Against Hampshire at Southampton in 1919 he made 120 and 102 not out. A noteworthy incident occurred in that match. Pothecary, the last Hampshire batsman, played a ball from Parker into the top of his pad, shook it into Smith's hands, and was given out caught contrary to law 33 B which declares in such a case that the ball becomes dead.

Harry Smith, born May 21, 1891, Fishponds, Bristol, died November 12, 1937, Downend, Bristol, was a cricketer who played for Gloucestershire and England.Smith was a reliable wicket-keeper and a right-hand batsman good enough to make 1000 runs in a season five times in the 1920s. He first played for Gloucestershire in 1912 and took over as regular wicket-keeper from Jack Board in 1914. From then until 1931,he was a regular in the side, often batting at No 3 in a team perennially reliant for its runs on just a few players.He played just one Test match, the first match ever against the West Indies at Lord's in 1928. He scored seven runs and took one catch, but made way in the next match for Harry Elliott, who in turn made way for George Duckworth for the third and final Test.Smith missed the whole of the 1932 season through illness, prompting Wisden in 1933 to an unusual tribute in its usually emotion-free pages:

"Smith's absence," it wrote,"meant something more than the loss of a thoroughly dependable wicket-keeper and a batsman capable of getting runs when runs were most needed, because, perhaps unconsciously, his fellow professionals had come to regard him as their father, and, in an unassuming way, he was a source of strength to his captain on the field. His value was equally marked in the dressing room and on the long journeys which continually had to be faced.Smith did not appear in first-class cricket in 1933 or 1934, but in 1935, Gloucestershire having failed to find an adequate successor as wicket-keeper, he returned for 15 county matches, though he was ill and his batting was negligible. He died little over two years later.

Only Test England v West Indies at Lord's, Jun 23-26, 1928
First-class span1912-1935

Douglas Robert Jardine (1900-1958) Test Cap No:235

Full name Douglas Robert Jardine
Born October 23, 1900, Malabar Hill, Bombay (now Mumbai), Maharashtra, India
Died June 18, 1958, Montreux, Switzerland (aged 57 years 238 days)
Major teams England, Oxford University, Services, Surrey
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak

Profile
Douglas Jardine and Bill Woodfull toss
 ahead of the fiery Adelaide Test
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Douglas Robert Jardine, who died of cancer in Switzerland, aged 57, was one of England's best captains and a leading amateur batsman of his time. He caught tick fever while visiting Southern Rhodesia in 1957 and thenceforward had been in poor health.

The son of MR Jardine, himself an Oxford Blue, Douglas Jardine was born at Bombay and educated at Winchester, where he was in the XI for three years, being captain in the last, 1919, when he headed the batting figures with 997 runs, average 66.46. Going up to New College, Oxford, he got his Blue as a Freshman and played against Cambridge in 1920, 1921 and 1923 without achieving anything out of the ordinary. He missed the 1922 University match because of a damaged knee. In 1923 he began to play for Surrey and in 1932 took over the captaincy from PGH Fender.

He went to Australia in 1928-29 with the MCC team under APF Chapman, taking part in all five Test matches. To England's success by 12 runs in the fourth Test he made a big contribution when scoring 98 and sharing with WR Hammond in a third-wicket partnership of 262. He also enjoyed the distinction of hitting three centuries in successive innings, against Western Australia, Victoria and New South Wales.

Harry Elliott (1891-1976) Test Cap No:234

Full name Harry Elliott
Born November 2, 1891, Scarcliffe, Derbyshire
Died February 2, 1976, Derby (aged 84 years 92 days)
Major teams England, Derbyshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Fielding position Wicketkeeper
Other Umpire

Profile
Harry Elliott, who died at Derby on February 4, aged 84, was born at Scarcliffe on November 2, 1891 (not 1895). It was whilst he was with Sir Joseph Laycock, at Wiseton Hall in Nottinghamshire that Sir Archibald White, formerly captain of Yorkshire, recommended him to Derbyshire, and he first played and kept wicket in 1920 against Essex. Immediately he made his place secure, displacing George Beet, but his early promise as a batsman never matured, though he was an excellent man in a crisis. He appeared in 194 consecutive Derbyshire matches up to 1928, when the Test match against West Indies broke the sequence; subsequently he made 232 consecutive appearances up to 1937 when injury intervened.