Wednesday, March 9

Greville Thomas Scott Stevens (1901-1970) Test Cap No:210

© The Cricketer International
Full name Greville Thomas Scott Stevens
Born January 7, 1901, Hampstead, London
Died September 19, 1970, Islington, London (aged 69 years 255 days)
Major teams England, CI Thornton's XI, Gentlemen, Harlequins, HDG Leveson-Gower's XI,
Marylebone Cricket Club, Middlesex, Oxford University
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak

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Greville Stevens was beyond question one of the outstanding amateurs of his time. A fine batsman and bowler of legbreaks and googlies, he came to the fore when in the XI at University College School from 1917 to 1919. He attracted special attention in the last year with an innings of 466 in a house match, and that season he was accorded the signal honour for a schoolboy of inclusion in the Gentlemen's team against the Players at Lord's. Middlesex readily appreciated his worth and they called upon his services in 1919. Upon his debut in first-class cricket, he took 10 Hampshire wickets at Lord's for 136 runs, and the next summer he helped Middlesex to win the County Championship. Not surprisingly, he gained his Blue as a Freshman at Oxford in 1920 and he remained a valued member of the University side for the following three years, being captain in 1922.

Francis Thomas Mann (1888-1964) Test Cap No:209

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Full name Francis Thomas Mann
Born March 3, 1888, Winchmore Hill, Middlesex
Died October 6, 1964, Milton-Lilbourne, Wiltshire (aged 76 years 217 days)
Major teams England, Cambridge University, Middlesex
Batting style Right-hand bat

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© Wisden Cricket Monthly
Frank Mann, who died suddenly on October 6, aged 76, was among the most forceful batsmen in the history of cricket. In the Malvern XI from 1904 to 1907, he was captain in the last year. Going up to Cambridge, he played in the University matches of 1909, 1910 and 1911 without achieving anything of note. Though he played Association football at Malvern, he gained a Rugby Blue as a forward in 1910.

in 1909 Mann began his association with Middlesex, for whom he played till 1931. He soon became celebrated for his powerful stroke-play, and particularly for his tremendous driving. Once against Yorkshire he drove the ball four times on to the roof of the Pavilion at Lord's. At Trent Bridge in 1925 he helped Middlesex to score 502, the highest fourth-innings total in the County Championship, and beat Nottinghamshire by four wickets. His contribution amounted to 101, he and E. Hendren (200) hitting off the last 271 runs in three and a quarter hours without being parted. Altogether Mann scored 14,182 runs at an average of 23.67 and brought off 165 catches, most of them at mid-off where he was an eminently safe fieldsman. The biggest of his eight three-figure innings was 194 from the Warwickshire bowling at Edgbaston in 1926. His best season for Middlesex was that of 1922, when he hit 935 runs, average 24.60.

A highly popular personality on and off the field, he captained Middlesex from 1921 to 1928, also acting as honorary secretary for most of that time, and he led them to the County Championship in the first season. He captained England in South Africa in 1922-23; one of his sons, F. G. Mann, also a Cambridge and Middlesex cricketer, followed suit 26 years later. Frank Mann represented Players against Gentlemen in fourteen matches between 1914 and 1930, distinguishing himself at Scarborough in 1922 by hitting 82 and 100. In 1930 he served as a member of the Test Selection Committee. As an officer in the Scots Guards during the First World War, he was three times wounded and three times mentioned in dispatches.

Test debut South Africa v England at Johannesburg, Dec 23-28, 1922
Last Test South Africa v England at Durban, Feb 16-22, 1923 
First-class span 1908-1933

Alexander Stuart Kennedy (1891-1959) Test Cap No:208

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Full name Alexander Stuart Kennedy
Born January 24,1891, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland
Died November 15, 1959, Langdown, Hythe, Southampton, Hampshire (aged 68 years 295 days)
Major teams England, Hampshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium

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He was born on January 24, 1891, in Edinburgh. Leaving school, he joined the nursery staff on the County Ground at Southampton in 1905. There was no one acting as coach to the Hampshire colts in those days and Kennedy actually gained his first real knowledge of cricket from watching the county players at practice and bowling to anyone who wanted a net.During the next two years he took part in a lot of country house cricket in and around Southampton, but mostly at Brockenhurst Park. About this time C.B. Llewellyn was playing for Hampshire and to him almost alone Kennedy owed whatever instruction he received in the art of flight and length bowling.Llewellyn took great interest in his young protégé and gave him every encouragement. Kennedy spent many hours at the nets trying to perfect his control of length by aiming to pitch the ball on a piece of paper.

Arthur Edward Robert Gilligan (1894-1976) Test Cap No:207

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Full name Arthur Edward Robert Gilligan
Born December 23, 1894, Denmark Hill, London
Died September 5, 1976, Mare Hill, Pulborough, Sussex (aged 81 years 257 days)
Major teams England, Cambridge University, Surrey, Sussex
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast-medium

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Herbie Taylor and Arthur Gilligan toss
ahead of the 1930 Birmingham Test
© Getty image
Arthur Edward Robert Gilligan who died at his home at Pulborough, aged 81, was one of the most popular and inspiring captains that England or Sussex ever had. Those whose memories go back that far will always feel that his tour of Australia in 1924-25, although England won only one Test, was the moment when we first had cause to hope that the dark days were ending, that soon we would be once more competing with Australia on level terms. In two or three seasons by his insistence on fielding and on attacking cricket and by his own superb example he raised Sussex from being nothing in particular to one of the biggest draws in England.

For all too short a span, before injury reduced his effectiveness, he was himself an exciting cricketer--the best really fast bowler we had produced for many years--though even then we did not quite put him among the great, a batsman of whom one might say that, however low he went in, no match was irredeemably lost until he was out for the second time, and one of the finest mid-offs anyone could remember.But even at the height of his career his services to cricket did not stop there. Unless he was touring abroad in the winter, he was touring Sussex, speaking at dinners, lecturing and doing all he could to spread the enthusiasm for the game that he himself felt; and this continued for years after his retirement. His first-class career ended in 1932--indeed he played little cricket of any kind afterwards--but he went on working tirelessly for Sussex cricket and, when opportunity offered, for England.

Arthur William Carr (1893-1963) Test Cap No:206

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Full name Arthur William Carr
Born May 21, 1893, Mickleham, Surrey
Died February 7, 1963, West Witton, Yorkshire (aged 69 years 262 days)
Major teams England, Nottinghamshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium

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© Wisden Cricket Monthly
Arthur Carr, who died at Leyburn, Yorkshire, on February 7, personified the South countryman's idea of a Northern cricket captain. This, however, was a matter of character rather than heredity, for he was the son of a London stockbroker, was born in Surrey and went to school at Sherborne. Tall, wide-shouldered, with a high forehead, eyes constantly narrowed - as if in appraisal - strong mouth and firm jaw, he took his cricket grimly, as though it satisfied some hugely combative streak in him. Unwavering once he had taken a decision, he was never one to suffer fools gladly, nor a believer in the soft answer to turn away wrath.
He went out of first-class cricket rather than change his opinion. Arthur Carr was one of the three finest batsmen ever produced by Sherborne: oddly enough, he was captain of every game there except cricket; but he was good enough batsman to be given a match for Nottinghamshire in 1910, a year before he left school. He scored his first county century in 1913, but his effective first-class cricketing career began when he became captain of Nottinghamshire in 1919. His captaincy had the firm foundation of playing ability. He was a fierce straight driver, at his most spectacular against pace bowling.

Andrew Sandham (1890-1982) Test Cap No:205

© The Cricketer International
Full name Andrew Sandham
Born July 6, 1890, Streatham, London
Died April 20, 1982, Westminster, London (aged 91 years 288 days)
Major teams England, Surrey
Batting style Right-hand bat
Other Coach

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© Getty image
Andrew Sandham, who died on April 20, at the age of 91, stoically accepted second billing throughout his long career to his incomparable opening partner, Jack Hobbs. Sixty-six times they posted a three-figures stand, including the towering 428 against Oxford University in 1926: yet the spotlight remained fixed to Hobbs, even when he failed and Sandham made runs.

From this it might be assumed that Andy Sandham was a mute No. 2. Some of his accomplishments argue otherwise. He once held the world Test record, making the First Test triple-century when he was in his 40th year, a 10-hour innings of 325 at Kingston, Jamaica, when England piled up 849 off the West Indies bowling.Sandham had to borrow his captain's long-handled bat and Hendren's shoes (which occasionally slipped off as he scuttled a single); and when England batted again, he went in at No. 7 and made 50. His match aggregate of 375 was a Test record until Greg Chappell beat it at Wellington 44 years and 543 Tests later.

Just before his 45th birthday, in 1935, the year of his second benefit, Sandham became the tenth batsman to score 100 centuries, turning the ball for two - "I'll always remember that stroke" - against Hampshire at Basingstoke. He finished with 107 centuries, including one in his last match for Surrey, at Hove in 1937. Ever neat, he finished with exactly 1,000 innings in first-class cricket, which produced 41,284 runs at an average of 44.83. Twice he came close to 300 for the county, retiring ill on 282 at Old Trafford in 1928 and being gently annoyed when Percy Fender declared overnight when he was 292 against Northants at the Oval in 1921.
© ESPNcricinfo Ltd

Sandham was born in Streatham on July 6, 1890, and made his Surrey debut in 1911. In the years to come he established himself as one of  the most trusty batsmen, but not as a Test player. Hobbs was an England fixture, and soon after the First World War, Sutcliffe made the other opening berth his own. Thus Sandham won a mere 14 caps, only three of them against Australia.Apart from his 325 he made 152 against West Indies at Bridgetown in the First Test of the 1929-30 series, which left him with the respectable Test average of 38.21; but his Ashes innings were all doomed to failure. By way of consolation, he is the only batsman to score a double-century for a county against the Australians; and he did score two centuries in a match for MCC against NSW."A sort of exponent of judo-batsmanship" was how Denzil Batchelor described him. He was not large enough to bang the ball about. He was a 'touch' player, gliding and steering the ball, or flicking a bouncer off his eyebrows. Robertson-Glasgow saw him as "primarily the servant of his art and his team, only secondarily the entertainer of the public".

He learned much from watching Tom Hayward in the early days, and it almost goes without saying that to bat with Hobbs every day was, for an observant man, a richly rewarding experience. Their running of lighting singles, born of almost telepathic understanding, was one of the game's pre-war joys.Apart from the 428 against Oxford, Sandham's name remains beside two other Surrey partnership records: 298 for the sixth, and 173 for the tenth, when he went in last man at Leyton in 1921, having been sick after lunch. Ducat made 290 not out, Sandham 58 in 100 minutes.

Charles Warrington Leonard Parker (1882-1959) Test Cap No:204

© The Cricketer International
Full name Charles Warrington Leonard Parker
Born October 14, 1882, Prestbury, Gloucestershire
Died July 11, 1959, Cranleigh, Surrey (aged 76 years 270 days)
Major teams England, Gloucestershire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Slow left-arm orthodox
Other Umpire, Coach

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© Wisden Cricket Monthly
Charles Warrington Leonard Parker, who died on July 11, 1959, aged 74, was for many years one of the finest slow left-arm bowlers in first-class cricket. Recommended to Gloucestershire by Dr. W. G. Grace, he joined the county staff in 1903, but not until after the First World War did he achieve real prominence. Then in every summer from 1920 to 1935, when he retired, he took over 100 wickets. In five of these seasons his victims numbered more than 200, for in 1922 he dismissed 206 batsmen; in 1924, 204; in 1925, 222; in 1926, 213; and in 1931, 219. His full figures during a distinguished career were 3,278 wickets-a record surpassed only by W. Rhodes and A. P. Freeman - at a cost of 19.46 runs each; he hit 8,197 runs, average 10.33, and brought off 235 catches.

© The Cricketer International
When pitches favoured him he could be well-nigh unplayable and by virtue of his command of spin and flight and, above all, accuracy of length, he was rarely easy to hot. His bowling feats were too numerous to be chronicled in full, but they included six hat-tricks, three of them in the 1924 season and two in the game with Middlesex at Bristol. He took all 10 wickets for 79 runs in to first Somerset innings at Bristol in 1921 and on eight different occasions obtained nine wickets in an innings. One of his most remarkable performances was at Gloucester m 1925 when he played an outstanding part in the crushing defeat of Essex. He disposed of nine batsmen - A. C. Russell was run out for 44 runs - in the first innings and eight for 12 in 17 overs in the second, achieving a match analysis of 17 wickets for 56 runs.

Charles Hallows (1895-1972) Test Cap No:203

© The Cricketer International
Full name Charles Hallows
Born April 4, 1895, Little Lever, Lancashire
Died November 10, 1972, Bolton, Lancashire (aged 77 years 220 days)
Major teams England, Lancashire
Batting style Left-hand bat
Bowling style Slow left-arm orthodox

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© The Cricketer International
Charlie Hallows, who died on November 10, was renowned in the 1920s in every North country home of cricket. He succeeded to the great Lancashire county tradition of opening batsmen - Hornby and Barlow, MacLaren and Ward, MacLaren and Spooner, then, after the 1914-18 war, Makepeace and Hallows, Hallows and Watson. In the summer of 1928 in consecutive games Hallows and Watson opened a Lancashire innings with scores of 200, 202, 107, 118, and accomplished first-wicket partnerships during this same season twelve times amounting to 100, four of those to 200. Charles Hallows, nephew of James Hallows, a superb all-round player in the MacLaren high noon, first came into the Lancashire XI in 1919, and soon established himself. He was a left-handed batsman who combined great obstinacy with recurrent strokes of rare style, ease, and mastery. His straightdrives were classic. But, in his period, Lancashire batsmen put forward their finest strokes

according to the plan of campaign mapped whenever Lancashire won the toss on a good wicket. The plan envisaged 300 runs on the first day, enough, as a rule, to give scope for pushing home to victory by bowlers as top-class as Parkin, McDonald, Richard Tyldesley, Hopwood. Harry Makepeace was the tactical power behind the throne. If the occasion happened to be Lancashire v Yorkshire at Old Trafford - gates closed at 11 am first day - and if Lancashire had won the toss in dry weather, the Makepeace dictate was: `Now, lads, wicket's lovely. No fours before lunch!' In those years a score of 300 in a day was considered tedious. I often `slated' Lancashire, in my reports, for such `slow' play; I often `slated' Hallows if he scored a century in four, or three-and-a-half, hours.

John Cornish White (1891-1961) Test Cap No:202

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Full name John Cornish White
Born February 19, 1891, Holford, Somerset
Died May 2, 1961, Yarde Farm, Combe-Florey, Somerset (aged 70 years 72 days)
Major teams England, Somerset
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Slow left-arm orthodox

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John Cornish White, known as Farmer or Jack, played for Somerset and England. White was named Wisden Cricketer of the Year in 1929. He played in 15 Test matches, and captained England in four of them.
A slow left arm bowler who used accuracy and variation of pace rather than spin to take wickets, he was a regular player for Somerset from 1913 to 1937, taking 100 wickets a season 14 times. In 1929 and 1930 he also scored more than 1,000 runs, completing the "cricketer's double". Among his county records, he took 16 Worcestershire wickets for 83 runs in the match at Bath in 1919. He also took all 10 Worcestershire wickets in an innings for 76 runs in 1921 at Worcester. His total number of wickets for Somerset, 2,165, is still the county record, as is his number of catches, 393.His career total of 2,355 wickets puts him 16th on the all-time list of wicket-takers.He was captain of Somerset from 1927 to 1931.

White was first picked for England in the difficult 1921 series against the Australians and was not then selected again for seven years. For the winter tour of Australia in 1928/29, he was vice-captain to Percy Chapman and the main bowler in a series that turned into a successful war of attrition. At Melbourne, he bowled 113 overs and five balls, and at Adelaide he surpassed that, bowling 124 overs and five balls and taking 13 wickets in the match for 256 runs, as England won by just 12 runs. In the final Test of the series, he stood in as captain for the injured Chapman, but lost the Test and so ended England's then-record-equalling run of seven consecutive Test victories.