Tuesday, March 8

Harold Thomas William Hardinge (1886-1965) Test Cap No:201

© sportspages.com
Full name Harold Thomas William Hardinge
Born February 25, 1886, Greenwich, London
Died May 8, 1965, Tenison Road, Cambridge (aged 79 years 72 days)
Major teams England, Kent
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Slow left-arm orthodox
Other Coach

Profile
© Cricketer International
© sportspages.com
Wally Hardinge was a stylish opening batsman, a capable slow left-arm bowler and an athletic fielder. He made his debut for Kent at the age of 16, and played for them for the next 31 seasons, the only interruption being the Great War. An integral member of Kent's first four Championships (he passed 1,000 runs in a season on 18 occasions) in any other era Hardinge would have made far more than one Test appearance. But such were the numbers of talented openers - Jack Hobbs and Herbert Sutcliffe to name two - his chances were almost non existent. His one Test was at Leeds against the all-conquering Australians of 1921 when he made 25 and 5. On retiring he briefly coached Leicestershire. Hardinge was a double international, capped at centre-forward for England against Scotland in 1910 (coincidently his match for England at cricket was also the only appearance for another double international, Andy Ducat). He also played for Newcastle United, Sheffield United and Arsenal.For a time, Hardinge worked as a sales rep for John Wisden & Co. but it was not a relationship which showed the company in a good light. In 1928 he asked them if they would pay half his expenses to travel to Australia at the same time as Percy Chapman's 1928-29 MCC team. Not only did the board reject his request; it voted that `no leave of absence be granted'. His services were dispensed with in 1934 when his first-class career ended.

Andrew Ducat (1886-1942) Test Cap No:200

© The Cricketer International
Full name Andrew Ducat
Born February 16, 1886, Brixton, London
Died July 23, 1942, Lord's Cricket Ground, St John's Wood, London (aged 56 years 157 days)
Major teams England, Surrey
Batting style Right-hand bat

Profile
© Wisden Cricket Monthly
The sudden death at Lord's, on July 23, of Andrew Ducat, Surrey batsman of high talent and effective execution, England international Association footballer, captain of a cup-winning Aston Villa team, and in recent years cricket coach at Eton, came as a shock to countless friends and admirers. A man of delightful disposition, quiet and unassuming, he endeared himself to all who met him and as a reporter of games, after giving up activity in the field, he revealed his character in unbiassed, accurate descriptions of matches and criticisms of the high-class players who were his successors. The last time I saw Ducat he sat a few feet from me in the Press box at Lord's. He passed a pleasant remark as he joined his fellow writers and we watched the cricket, intent on the players in the field. Next thing I heard of him, a few days afterwards, was his final and fatal appearance at the crease, where we had seen other cricketers play the game with all the energy of keen sportsmen such as always identified his own efforts.That Ducat should collapse and die, bat in hand, was the last thing anyone would have expected of such a well-set-up, vigorous, healthy-looking and careful-living man. Evidence of those in the field proved clearly that he expired directly after playing a stroke and as he prepared to receive another ball, for he was dead when carried to the pavilion.

George Brown (1887-1964) Test Cap No:199

© Wisden Cricket Monthly
Full name George Brown
Born October 6, 1887, Cowley, Oxford
Died December 3, 1964, Winchester, Hampshire (aged 77 years 58 days)
Major teams England, Hampshire
Batting style Left-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium
Fielding position Wicketkeeper

Profile
George Brown was one of the most colourful of cricketers. Countless stories were -still are- told about him and, if some are apocryphal, they are no more surprising than many that are undoubtedly true. The earliest recounts that, in the spring of 1906, when he was eighteen, he set out from Cowley in Oxford- shire-that prolific nursery of Hampshire cricketers-with a tin trunk, a bat, a pair of plimsolls and the bare price of a single ticket to Southampton. The last, so far as his playing career is concerned, relates that in 1933, rising 46, he began his last season by opening the innings against Surrey on a difficult Oval wicket and carrying his bat for 150 of his side's total of 294.

Nigel Esmé Haig (1887-1966) Test Cap No:198

The Middlesex side that won the 1921 Championship. Richard Twining,
Hugh Dales, Jack Hearne, Jack Durston, Arthur Tanner, Harry Lee;
(front row, l-r) Patsy Hendren, Nigel Haig, Frank Mann, Hon Clarence ,
 Bruce,Joe Murrell.© EMPICS
Full name Nigel Esmé Haig
Born December 12, 1887, Kensington, London
Died October 27, 1966, Eastbourne, Sussex (aged 78 years 319 days)
Major teams England, Middlesex
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast-medium

Profile
Nigel Esmé Haig signature © sportspages.com
Nigel Haig was a celebrated amateur allrounder between the two World Wars. He did not gain a place in the XI while at Eton, but from 1912 until he retired from the game in 1934 he rendered splendid service to Middlesex, whom he captained for the last six years of his career. He was a member of the Championship-winning sides of 1920 and 1921. In addition, he played for England against Australia in the second of the disastrous Test series of 1921 and four times against the West Indies for the Hon. F. S. G. Calthorpe's M.C.C. team of 1929-30 without achieving much success. In all first-class cricket, Haig hit 15,208 runs, average 20.83, and with swing-bowling above medium pace he obtained 1,116 wickets for 27.47 runs each.

Alfred John Evans (1889-1960) Test Cap No:197

© The Cricketer International
Full name Alfred John Evans
Born May 1, 1889, Newtown, Hampshire
Died September 18, 1960, Marylebone, London (aged 71 years 140 days)
Major teams England, Hampshire, Kent, Oxford University
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium-fast

Profile
Altham wrote of him: "A somewhat uncertain starter with the bat, his method once he got going, was both classical and impressive". He achieved a wider fame for escaping from a Prisoner of War camp in the First World War. After that he wrote The Escaping Club, a classic book about his breakout.Wisden obituary Alfred John Evans, who died in London on September 18, aged 71, was a fine all-round sportsman. Educated at Winchester, where his father, A. H. Evans, a former Oxford cricket Blue and captain, was a master, he won both the schools racquets and the golf in 1905 and the two succeeding years, and played at Lord's for three years. Going up to Oxford he won his cricket Blue as a Freshman in 1909, scoring 79 and 46. He also played against Cambridge in the three following seasons, doing good work as a hard-driving batsman and medium-paced bowler. He led the side in 1911.

In 1910 he represented his University at racquets and in 1909 and 1910 at golf. He played cricket for Hampshire in 1911 and, after serving with distinction in the Royal Flying Corps during the First World War, when he earned fame for his escapes from enemy prison-camps, he assisted Kent and M.C.C. In 1921, on the strength of an innings of 69 not out for M.C.C. against the Australians, he was chosen for England in the Test match at Lord's, but was not a success.

Only Test England v Australia at Lord's, Jun 11-14, 1921
First-class span1908-1928

Frederick John Durston (1893-1965) Test Cap No:196

© The Cricketer International
Full name Frederick John Durston
Born July 11, 1893, Clophill, Bedfordshire
Died April 8, 1965, Norwood Green, Southall, Middlesex (aged 71 years 271 days)
Major teams England, Middlesex
Also known as Long Jack
Batting style Right-hand bat
Other Coach

Profile
Frederick John Durston, the former Middlesex and England fast bowler, died in hospital at Southall on April 8, aged 71. Born on July 11, 1893, at Clophill, Bedfordshirewith whose village club he learned the game-he went to Lord's as a groundboy in 1914. After serving with the Royal Engineers, he returned to Lord's in 1919 and, on the recommendation of E. G. Wynyard, the old Hampshire cricketer, made his debut for Middlesex in four matches. In his first full season-1920-he played a material part in helping Middlesex win the championship, taking 113 wickets in all matches, the first of six occasions on which he was to take 100 wickets in a season. In three other years he took over ninety.

Standing well over six feet and magnificently built, he was a right-arm opening bowler - perhaps fast-medium rather than fast-with fine powers of endurance and consistent accuracy of length. He achieved his highest aggregate (136 wickets) in 1921, when Middlesex again won the championship and when he played for England against Australia at Lord's-his only Test: his five wickets in the match included C. G. Macartney in each innings and Warwick Armstrong for a duck. Shortly afterwards he took eight wickets for the Players against the Gentlemen at Lord's, but though he represented the Players on six other occasions he never again appeared in the Lord's fixture. He performed hattricks against both Universities-at Fenner's in 1922 and in the Parks the following year. Some success He toured Jamaica with Mr Julien Cahn's side early in 1929, and when his first-class career was over he visited the Argentine with Sir Theodore Brinckman's team in 1937-38. He retired from first-class cricket in 1933, having changed with some success to slow off-spin bowling in his last two years. Altogether in first-class matches he took 1,329 wickets for 29,279 runs (av. 22.03). In addition he was a powerful right-hand hitter, scoring nearly 4,000 runs, his highest innings being 92 not out against Northamptonshire at Lord's in 1930. At Leyton in 1927 he assisted Hendren establish the present Middlesex ninth-wicket record-an unbroken 160, scored in only 80 minutes.

Alfred Ernest Dipper (1885-1945) Test Cap No:195

© ESPNcricinfo Ltd
Full name Alfred Ernest Dipper
Born November 9, 1885, Apperley, Gloucestershrie
Died November 7, 1945, Lambeth, London (aged 59 years 363 days)
Major teams England, Gloucestershire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium
Other Umpire

Profile
Alfred Ernest Dipper signature
© sportspages.com
Alfred Ernest Dipper, died at St. Thomas's Hospital, London, on November 7, within two days of his 58th birthday. He played for Gloucestershire from 1908 to 1932, and on retiring became a first-class umpire. Seldom can chance have entered more into a professional's county baptism than was the case with Dipper. A man short for the match at Tonbridge against Kent in June, Gloucestershire requested a local club to fill the vacancy and, in reply, came Dipper of Tewkesbury. Making 30 not out, highest score for the side when going in last but two, Dipper got eight in a more disastrous second-innings collapse. Then a steady 19 checked a breakdown against Somerset and helped in a victory by six wickets. When promoted in the batting order he fared disastrously several times and could not keep his place in the side, then captained by G. L. Jessop, but from 1911 he regularly registered a four-figure aggregate and became a very dependable opening batsman of the stolid type. Five times he exceeded 2,000 and passed the thousand in ten other seasons;

George Ernest Tyldesley (1889-1962) Test Cap No:194

© The Cricketer International
Full name George Ernest Tyldesley
Born February 5, 1889, Roe Green, Worsley, Lancashire
Died May 5, 1962, Rhos-on-Sea, Denbighshire, Wales (aged 73 years 89 days)
Major teams England, Lancashire
Batting style Right-hand bat

Profile
Ernest Tyldesley, the former Lancashire and England batsman and a member of the well-known Lancashire cricketing family, died at his home at Rhos-on-Sea, North Wales, on May 5, at the age of 73. Though never one of the giants of the game and rarely aspiring to brilliance of style, he established himself - especially during the 1920s-as one of the pillars of Lancashire cricket, so that his final total of runs and centuries in first-class cricket has remained unsurpassed by any Lancashire player.

Thomas Leonard Richmond (1890-1957) Test Cap No:193

Full name Thomas Leonard Richmond
Born June 23, 1890, Radcliffe-on-Trent, Nottinghamshire
Died December 29, 1957, Saxondale, Nottinghamshire (aged 67 years 189 days)
Major teams England, Nottinghamshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak googly

Profile
Thomas Leonard "Tich" Richmond (23 June 1890 in Radcliffe-on-Trent, Nottinghamshire – 29 December 1957 in Saxondale, Nottinghamshire) was a cricketer who played for Nottinghamshire and England.A small and somewhat rotund leg-break and googly bowler, Richmond played a few matches for Nottinghamshire before the First World War, but came to the fore in the years after it, taking 100 wickets and more every season from 1920 to 1926. His best year was 1922 when he took 169 wickets, then a Nottinghamshire record, later overtaken by Bruce Dooland. His career then faded rather fast, and he dropped out of the county side after 1928.Richmond's one Test match was on his home ground of Trent Bridge against the all-conquering Australian cricket team of 1921 led by Warwick Armstrong. He scored six runs in two innings and took two wickets for 86 runs, but was never chosen again.Richmond's batting was rarely of any account, and, like his fielding, suffered as he got older and stouter. But in 1922, against Derbyshire at Worksop, he scored 70 in 65 minutes, putting on 140 for the tenth wicket with Sam Staples.

Donald John Knight (1894-1960) Test Cap No:192

© Getty image
Full name Donald John Knight
Born May 12, 1894, Sutton, Surrey
Died January 5, 1960, Marylebone, London (aged 65 years 238 days)
Major teams England, Oxford University, Surrey
Batting style Right-hand bat
Other Coach

Profile
Donald John Knight, the former Surrey and England batsman, died in London on January 5 at the age of 65. He was generally regarded as one of the most accomplished amateurs of the period immediately following the first world war, his gracefulness at the crease marking him as a model amongst batsmen. He was born on May 12, 1894, and while a schoolboy at Malvern attained a wide and deserved reputation as a prolific scorer with an especially mature defence. He was in the school XI as an opening batsman for the five years from 1909 to 1913, during which time he scored 2,860 runs at an average of 46.88, and captained the side in his last two years. He showed his early prowess by playing an innings of 211 against H. K. Foster's XI in 1911, and two years later scored 122 and 133 not out in the match against Old Malvernians, both wonderful feats for a boy still at school. He was barely 15 when he appeared for Surrey 11 (and scored 53) in 1909, and two seasons later made his debut for Surrey in first-class cricket.

Vallance William Crisp Jupp (1891-1960) Test Cap No:191

VWC (Vallance William Crisp) Jupp,
with JWHT (John William Henry Tyler) Douglas,
Full name Vallance William Crisp Jupp
Born March 27, 1891, Burgess Hill, Sussex
Died July 9, 1960, Spratton, Northamptonshire (aged 69 years 104 days)
Major teams England, Northamptonshire, Sussex
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm offbreak

Profile
Vallance William Crisp Jupp, who collapsed and died in the garden of his home on July 9, aged 69, was one of the rare cricketers who began as a professional and later became an amateur. A splendid allrounder, who played eight times for England, he was one of the best players in the country between the two World Wars. Born at Burgess Hill, Sussex on March 27, 1891, Jupp was educated privately and later went to St. John's School, Burgess Hill, where he became captain of the eleven. In his last year there he averaged over 100 with the bat and his achievements attracted the attention of the county authorities. He started with Sussex as a professional and made steady progress. In 1914 he played an innings of 217 not out against Worcestershire at Worcester and averaged over 36 for the season. With 51 wickets, he headed the county bowling averages that year.

Percy Holmes (1886-1971) Test Cap No:190

© ESPNcricinfo Ltd
Full name Percy Holmes
Born November 25, 1886, Oakes, Huddersfield, Yorkshire
Died September 3, 1971, Marsh, Huddersfield, Yorkshire (aged 84 years 282 days)
Major teams England, Yorkshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium

Profile
© The Cricketer International
Over decades a Yorkshire batsman has been one of the two opening an England innings in Test matches, Rhodes with Hobbs, Sutcliffe with Hobbs, Hutton with Washbrook; now Boycott sustains the great tradition. But one of Yorkshire's most accomplished Number One (or Number Two) batsmen only once raised the curtain of an England innings v. Australia; his name Percy Holmes, a name as famous in Yorkshire during the 1920's and early 1930's, as Brown or Tunnicliffe, or Sutcliffe or Rhodes, or Boycott.

Holmes opened for England at Trent Bridge against Gregory and McDonald, the fearsome bowlers of Warwick Armstrong's rough-riding team, which arrived in England in 1921, having defeated J. W. H. T. Douglas's hapless England contingent five times in five Test matches, in Australia, each played to a finish. And in 1921, blessed by a glorious English summer, Armstrong's conquerors proceeded to annihilate England in the first three Test matches, three-day engagements. And the victories were settled well within the allotted time span.

Percy Holmes walked jauntily to the wicket at Trent Bridge on May 28, 1921, accompanied by D. J. Knight. England were all out for 112 and Holmes defended stoutly for ninety minutes, making top score, 30. Next innings he made no more than 8. The match was all over on the second afternoon. And this was the end of his Test match appearances until the South African season of 1927-28. He then went in first with Sutcliffe in five consecutive Test matches, at Johannesburg, Cape Town, and Durban; his scores were 0 and 15 not out; 9 and 88; 70 and 56; 1 and 63; and in the fifth game of this rubber 0 and 0.

Evelyn Rockley Wilson (1879-1957) Test Cap No:189

Full name Evelyn Rockley Wilson
Born March 25, 1879, Bolsterstone, Yorkshire
Died July 21, 1957, Winchester, Hampshire (aged 78 years 118 days)
Major teams England, Cambridge University, Yorkshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm slow
Other Coach

Profile
Evelyn Rockley Wilson, who died at Winchester on July 21, aged 78, was one of the best amateur slow right-arm bowlers of his time. Educated at Rugby, he was in the XI for three years from 1895, heading both batting and bowling figures when captain in 1897. With a highest innings of 206 not out, he averaged 51.11 in batting and he took 31 wickets for 14.93 runs each. Before he gained his Blue at Cambridge, whom he represented against Oxford in four matches from 1899 to 1902, he scored a century against his University for A. J. Webbe's XI. In the University match of 1901 he hit 118 and 27 and took five wickets for 71 runs and two for 38, and in that of 1902, when captain, he played a noteworthy part in victory by five wickets for the Light Blues by taking five wickets for 23 and three for 66.

Arthur Dolphin (1885-1942) Test Cap No:188

Full name Arthur Dolphin
Born December 24, 1885, Wilsden, Yorkshire
Died October 23, 1942, Lilycroft, Heaton, Bradford, Yorkshire (aged 56 years 303 days)
Major teams England, Maharaja of Patiala's XI, Yorkshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Fielding position Wicketkeeper
Other Umpire

Profile
Arthur Dolphin, the well-known wicket-keeper and Test match umpire, died at his home in Bradford on October 24 in his 56th year. Yorkshire wicket-keepers have been noted for long and effective service, and Dolphin followed Ned Stephenson, George Pinder, Joe Hunter and David Hunter, while Arthur Wood, his successor, came as the sixth who, taken together, did splendid service for their county during nearly 80 years.

Percy George Herbert Fender (1892-1985) Test Cap No:187

© Wisden Cricket Monthly
Full name Percy George Herbert Fender
Born August 22, 1892, Balham, London
Died June 15, 1985, Exeter, Devon (aged 92 years 297 days)
Major teams England, Surrey, Sussex
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium, Legbreak

Profile
Percy Fender on his way to
185 against Hampshire
© Wisden Cricket Monthly
Percy Fender was the last survivor of those who had played county cricket regularly before the Great War: more important, he was one of the most colourful figures in the cricket world for many years after it and was widely regarded as the shrewdest county captain of his generation. In a career of 26 years he scored 19,034 runs with an average of 26.66, took 1,894 wickets at 25.05, made 21 hundreds and caught 599 catches. Six times he did the double. But he was not a cricketer who could be judged on figures.

© Getty image
Wisden has never been a slave to statistics and, when in 1915 he appeared as one of the Five Cricketers of the Year, it was after a season in which both his bowling and batting averages had been approximately 23 and he had not scored 1,000 runs nor taken 100 wickets. Yet the honour was fully deserved. Surrey had won the Championship and Tom Hayward had said that Fender was the making of their XI. In a crucial match, for instance, against Kent, the reigning champions, at Lord's in August (The Oval was occupied by the military), going in on a pitch made for Blythe, who took nine for 97.

Joseph William Henry Makepeace (1881-1952) Test Cap No:186

© ESPNcricinfo Ltd
Full name Joseph William Henry Makepeace
Born August 22, 1881, Middlesbrough, Yorkshire
Died December 19, 1952, Spital, Bebington, Cheshire (aged 71 years 119 days)
Major teams England, Lancashire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak

Profile
Joseph William Henry "Harry" Makepeace, who died at his home at Bebington, Cheshire, on December 19, aged 70, was one of the few men who played both cricket and Association football for England. Born at Middlesbrough, Yorkshire, on August 22, 1882, he was associated with Lancashire C.C.C. for forty-six years. His playing career with the country commenced in 1906 and he held a place in the side until 1930. Altogether he scored in first-class cricket 25,745 runs, average 36.15, including forty-three centuries, the highest of which was 203 against Worcestershire at Worcester in 1923.

Henry Howell (1890-1932) Test Cap No:185

© shop.sportsworldcards.comP
Full name Henry Howell
Born November 29, 1890, Hockley, Birmingham, Warwickshire
Died July 9, 1932, Selly Oak, Birmingham, Warwickshire (aged 41 years 223 days)
Major teams England, Warwickshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast

Profile
Henry Howell (29 November 1890, Hockley, Birmingham, Warwickshire – 9 July 1932, Selly Oak, Warwickshire) was an English footballer and cricketer who played in 5 Tests from 1920 to 1924.He was a right-handed fast bowler and right-handed batsman who played county cricket for Warwickshire.He made 5 appearances in tests for the England cricket team, with his first match at the MCG during England's 1920-21 Ashes series with Australia. His last England Test appearance was in August 1924 at The Oval against South Africa. He took a total of 7 wickets in his test career.

Howell played for Burslem Swifts and Wolverhampton Wanderers during World War I as well as guesting for both Stoke and Port Vale. Despite only being a guest he was the Valiants top scorer during the 1918–19 season with nine goals.He returned to Wolves in the summer of 1919 and later played for Southampton (without making any first-team appearances), Northfleet, Accrington Stanley (on trial) and Macclesfield Town. He made a total of 38 Football League appearances with Wolves and three with Accrington Stanley.

Test debut Australia v England at Melbourne, Dec 31, 1920 - Jan 4, 1921
Last Test England v South Africa at The Oval, Aug 16-19, 1924
First-class span 1913-1928

Abraham Waddington (1893-1959) Test Cap No:184

© The Cricketer International
Full name Abraham Waddington
Born February 4, 1893, Clayton, Thornton, Yorkshire
Died October 28, 1959, Throxenby, Scarborough, Yorkshire (aged 66 years 266 days)
Major teams England, Yorkshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Left-arm fast-medium

Profile
© En.wikipedia.org
Abraham "Abe" Waddington, sometimes known as Abram Waddington was a professional cricketer for Yorkshire, who played in two Test matches for England against Australia in 1920–21. Between 1919 and 1927 Waddington made 255 appearances for Yorkshire, and in all first-class cricket played in 266 first-class matches. In these games, he took a total of 852 wickets with his left arm fast-medium bowling.

Waddington first played for Yorkshire after the First World War, when the team had been weakened by injuries and retirements. He made an immediate impression in his first season, 1919, taking 100 wickets; after a similarly successful season in 1920 he was selected for the 1920–21 Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC) tour of Australia. On the tour Waddington appeared in two of the five Tests. However, the England team were outclassed; used in an unfamiliar tactical role, Waddington took just one wicket in his two Tests, and never played for England again. At home, his reputation as a hostile, uncompromising opponent was cemented by incidents in 1924, but a succession of injuries reduced his effectiveness before his retirement from first-class cricket in 1927. He continued to play at a lower level and worked for the family business, maintaining his connection with Yorkshire cricket. Waddington was successful in other sports, notably golf and football.

Charles Albert George Russell (1887-1961) Test Cap No:183

© Wisden Cricket Monthly
Full name Charles Albert George Russell
Born October 7, 1887, Leyton, Essex
Died March 23, 1961, Whipps Cross, Leytonstone, Essex (aged 73 years 167 days)
Major teams England, Essex
Batting style Right-hand bat
Other Coach

Profile
Charles Albert George "Jack" Russell, who died in Whipps Cross Hospital on March 23, aged 73, was the first English batsman to hit a century in each innings of a Test match. This he did against South Africa at Durban in 1923 when he scored 140 and 111 and played a leading part in England's rubber-winning victory by 109 runs. The performance was the more remarkable because Jack Russell, as he was generally known, had,Wisden recorded at the time, to battle against illness; when he started his second innings he ought to have been in bed rather than on the cricket field.

Cecil Harry Parkin (1886-1943) Test Cap No:182

© sportspages.com
Full name Cecil Harry Parkin
Born February 18, 1886, Eaglescliffe, Co Durham
Died June 15, 1943, Cheetham Hill, Manchester, Lancashire (aged 57 years 117 days)
Major teams England, Lancashire, Yorkshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm offbreak

Profile
Ciss Parkin was by any reckoning something of an oddball. The livewire of the dressing-room, his comic talents and conjuring tricks kept team-mates - and often the spectators - amused. But had a knack of upsetting people as well by expressing his outspoken views. His England career was nipped in the bud when he criticised Arthur Gilligan, the captain, in a newspaper article. Two years later his county career finished in equally acrimonious circumstances with a public - and bitter- falling out with the Lancashire committee. But on the field he was a devastating offspinner, always ready to experiment with speed, flight and guile. This led to regular spats with captains who struggled to set fields to Parkin's requirements.

Elias Henry Hendren (1889-1962) Test Cap No:181

© Wisden Cricket Monthly
Full name Elias Henry Hendren
Born February 5, 1889, Turnham Green, Middlesex
Died October 4, 1962, Tooting Bec, London (aged 73 years 241 days)
Major teams England, Middlesex
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm slow
Fielding position Occasional wicketkeeper
Other Coach

Profile
Maurice Turnbull and Patsy Hendren
© Glamorgan County Cricket Club
Patsy Hendren walks out
 to bat against Surrey
© Getty Images
Patsy Hendren, who died in a London hospital on October 4, 1962, aged 73, was one of the most famous batsmen to play for Middlesex and England. Only one cricketer, Sir John Hobbs, in the whole history of the first-class game hit more centuries than Hendren's 170; only two, Hobbs and F. E. Woolley, exceeded his aggregate of runs, 57,610 at an average of 50.80 per innings.

"Patsy," as, because of his Irish ancestry, he was affectionately known the world over, joined the Lord's groundstaff in 1905 and from his first appearance for Middlesex in 1909 he played regularly till 1937. Not always orthodox in style, this short, stockily-built batsman was celebrated for the power with which he invested his driving, for his cutting and for his courage in hooking fast bowlers. On pitches helpful to bowlers he used his feet with consummate skill. His ability as a deep fieldsman is illustrated to some extent by the number of catches he brought off, 725, but the number of runs he saved cannot be gauged.

Lionel Hallam Tennyson (1889-1951) Test Cap No:180

© Hampshire County Cricket Club
Full name Lionel Hallam Tennyson
Born November 7, 1889, Westminster, London
Died June 6, 1951, Bexhill-on-Sea, Sussex (aged 61 years 211 days)
Major teams England, Hampshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast

Profile
© The Cricketer International
Tennyson, The Third Baron, who died at Bexhill-on-Sea on June 6, aged 61, was a grandson of the poet and succeeded his father in the title in 1928. Intimately identified with Hampshire cricket from 1913 to 1936, he captained the county team for fourteen years from 1919 onwards. During his career he scored 16,828 runs, average 23.63, including nineteen centuries. His highest innings was 217 against the West Indies at Southampton in 1928, when, after the fall of five Hampshire wickets for 88, he and J. Newman (118) shared in a partnership of 311.While never a really dependable batsman, he was, at his best, a splendid hitter and represented in a striking way the spirit of adventure on the cricket field. He knew no fear, and the more desperate the position the more likely was he to accomplish something brilliant. Gregory and McDonald, the famous Australian fast bowlers who frightened so many of our professional batsmen in 1921, held no terrors for him.

He scored 74 not out in the second innings of the Test match at Lord's that year and was chosen to succeed J. W. H. T. Douglas as captain of England in the three remaining contests with Australia. At Leeds, while fielding in the first Test of this series, he damaged his hand badly enough to have justified him in forgoing his innings.

Major William Booth (1886-1916) Test Cap No:179

© ESPNcricinfo Ltd
Full name Major William Booth
Born December 10, 1886, Lowtown, Pudsey, Yorkshire
Died July 1, 1916, near La Cigny, France (aged 29 years 204 days)
Major teams England, Yorkshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium-fast

Profile
© nam.ac.uk
Second Lieut. Major William Booth (West Yorkshire Regiment), born at Pudsey on December 10, 1886, fell in action in July (the opening day of the Somme offensive). His earliest cricket was played at Fulneck School, and later he was associated with Pudsey St. Lawrence and the Wath Athletic Club, which played in the Mexborough League, and of which he was captain. He appeared regularly for Yorkshire 2nd XI in 1907 and two following seasons, and in 1908 received his first trial for the County.

He did not, however, secure a regular place in the team until two years later, but in 1911 he scored 1,125 runs for his county and took seventy-four wickets, with a highest innings of 210 against Worcestershire on the Worcester ground. He increased his reputation as a bowler in the following summer, and in 1913 made over a thousand runs and took 158 wickets of Yorkshire, his aggregate of 181 wickets in first-class matches being the highest of any bowler that season. In 1914 he was not so successful in batting, but he obtained 141 wickets for Yorkshire at a cost of 18 runs apiece. Although a fine punishing batsman,

Harry Dean (1884-1957) Test Cap No:178

© boundarybooks.com
Full name Harry Dean
Born August 13, 1884, Burnley, Lancashire
Died March 12, 1957, Garstang, Lancashire (aged 72 years 211 days)
Major teams England, Lancashire
Batting style Left-hand bat
Bowling style Left-arm fast-medium
Other Coach

Profile
Harry Dean, who died at his home at Garstang, near Blackpool, on March 12, aged 71, was one of the most successful bowlers who ever played for Lancashire. He first appeared for the county in 1906 and before he left them at the end of the 1921 season he took, with left-arm bowling, 1,301 wickets in all first-class matches for 18.14 runs apiece. He suited his methods to the conditions, bowling fast-medium with deceptive swerve or slow according to the state of the pitch.

Joseph Vine (1875-1946) Test Cap No:177

© En.wikipedia.org
Full name Joseph Vine
Born May 15, 1875, Willingdon, Sussex
Died April 25, 1946, Aldrington, Hove, Sussex (aged 70 years 345 days)
Major teams England, London County, Sussex
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak
Other Coach

Profile
Joseph Vine, one of the best and most popular among many Sussex professionals possessing similar characteristics, died on April 25, aged 70. Below medium height and strongly built, he could bat for long hours, field in the deep with rare speed and certainty, and bowl slow leg-breaks without tiring. His aggregate of 25,169 runs, average 29.92, and 683 wickets at 29.99, give an idea of the work he got through from 1896 to 1922; and seldom can anyone have equalled his appearance in 421 consecutive matches for Sussex, a number extended to 503 with only one absence from a match against Oxford.

Ernest James Smith (1886-1979) Test Cap No:176

© The Cricketer International
Full name Ernest James Smith
Born February 6, 1886, Highgate, Birmingham, Warwickshire
Died August 31, 1979, Northfield, Birmingham, Warwickshire (aged 93 years 206 days)
Major teams England, Warwickshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Fielding position Wicketkeeper
Other Umpire

Profile
THE death of 'Tiger" Smith ends an association with Warwickshire that began up a tree 83 years ago. Born on February 6, 1886, Ernest James Smith was just 10 years old when he watched Kent v Warwickshire from a tree outside his beloved Edgbaston ground. From that day he was hooked on Warwickshire cricket. It was a relationship which mellowed over the years and right up to the recent Test match at Edgbaston he was a familiar, well-loved figure at the ground.

John William Hitch (1886-1965) Test Cap No:175

© shop.sportsworldcards.com
Full name John William Hitch
Born May 7, 1886, Radcliffe, Lancashire
Died July 7, 1965, Rumney, Cardiff, Glamorgan, Wales (aged 79 years 61 days)
Major teams England, Surrey
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast
Other Umpire, Coach

Profile
Bill Hitch - known to his followers at The Oval as Billitch - was famous for his unusual, hopping run-up. On his day he was genuinely fast - he once sent a bail flying 55 yards - a lusty lower-order hitter who love nothing more than launching balls out of The Oval, and, in the era before protective clothing, a brilliant and fearless short-leg fielder. He started his career in Cambridgeshire before being spotted by Tom Hayward and signed by Surrey. He toured Australia twice with MCC - in 1911-12 and 1920-21 - without any real success, and his seven Test appearances did not do justice to his ability. In his final Test, against Australia at The Oval in 1921, he cracked 51 in 40 minutes.

Charles Philip Mead (1887-1958) Test Cap No:174

© Hampshire County Cricket Club
Full name Charles Philip Mead
Born March 9, 1887, Battersea, London
Died March 26, 1958, Boscombe, Hampshire (aged 71 years 17 days)
Major teams England, Hampshire
Batting style Left-hand bat
Bowling style Slow left-arm orthodox

Profile
© Wisden Cricket Monthly
Only Jack Hobbs, Frank Woolley and Patsy Hendren have made more first-class runs than Phil Mead (55,061), and nobody has made more for one team than the 48,892 he piled up for Hampshire. Solid in defence and a crisp strokeplayer, Mead was extremely prolific for England too. He averaged 49 over 17 Tests, including an unbeaten 182 at The Oval against the rampant 1921 Australians. He played his last Test at 41, but went blind later in life and died in Boscombe in 1958.

He was never much concerned with records. But, pressed to choose one for himself, I have little doubt that he would have picked that which, in fact, stands to his name - with no indication that it will ever be wrested from him. That record is for the greatest number of runs scored by any player for one team in the entire history of cricket. The number is 48,892, scored by Philp Mead for Hampshire.

The figure is staggering. He would have liked us to make that comment. he would have pointed out, though, that he did not only bat for Hampshire; that, in all first-class matches, he totalled 55,061 runs, with 153 centuries and an average of 47.67. But for four seasons lost to the First World War, he must have made at least 8,000 more. His first-class career is given officially as from 1905 to 1936: but in 1905, while he was qualifying for Hampshire, he played in only one match. so his runs were made in 27 seasons: an average of more than 2,000 runs a year. We may adduce one more piece of evidence about him before we dispense with "damned dots" - Mead's average in Test cricket against Australia (51.87 in, surprisingly enough, only seven Tests, and jthose spread over seventeen years) is higher than his figure for all play.No one who saw Philip Mead bat will ever forget him. At the fall of Hampshire's second wicket he would emerge from the pavilion with a peculiar rolling gait, his sloping shoulders, wide hips and heavy, bowed legs giving him the bottom-heavy appearance of those lead-based, won't-fall-down dolls of our childhood. Leathery complexioned, with a long nose, a wry expression and eyes which seemed always to be screwed up against the sun, he had a semi-comic air: but he was a very serious batsman.

Septimus Paul Kinneir (1871-1928) Test Cap No:173

© En.wikipedia.org
Full name Septimus Paul Kinneir
Born May 13, 1871, Pickwick, Corsham, Wiltshire
Died October 16, 1928, Birmingham, Warwickshire (aged 57 years 156 days)
Major teams England, Warwickshire
Batting style Left-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium

Profile
Septimus P.Kinneir was born at Corsham, in Wiltshire, on the 13th May, 1873. Recognition outside county cricket has come to him rather late in his career. For years he has been one of the mainstays of the Warwickshire eleven, often dividing honours with W.G. Quaife, but not till last summer was he thought of in connection with representative matches. His chance of distinction was due in a sense to accident. The Gentlemen and Players match at the Oval being treated as one of the Test Trial series, the Selection Committee - Lord Hawke, G. L. Jessop, and P. F. Warner - in picking the Players side, decided to leave out Hayward and George Hirst. Kinneir was given a place in the eleven, and made the most of his opportunity, scoring 158 and not out 53. His play made a great impression. It was thought that with his strong defence and extreme steadiness, he would be just the man for the Sydney and Melbourne wickets, and he soon received an invitation to join the M.C.C.'s team for Australia.

John William Hearne (1891-1965) Test Cap No:172

© The Cricketer International
Full name John William Hearne
Born February 11, 1891, Hillingdon, Middlesex
Died September 14, 1965, West Drayton, Middlesex (aged 74 years 215 days)
Major teams England, Middlesex
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak googly

Profile
© ebay.co.uk
Although he had been, as all his friends knew, in poor health for a number of years, the death of J. W. Hearne on September 14 in his 75th year will have came as a great shock to all who had known him as a man, a cricketer and a personal friend, and above all to those who played both with and against him during his distinguished career for England and Middlesex. Born on the 11th February 1891, he made his first appearance in eight matches for Middlesex in 1909-in which year he showed promise for the future with an innings of 71 against Somerset. In the following season he scored 725 runs and took 49 wickets, foreshowing his great future as an allrounder. Incidentally in the match against Surrey at the Oval in that year, when I was first invited to play for the County, J. W. and I each missed "Razor" Smith while he made six runs, with the result that we lost the match by two wickets ! 1 may say that both catches were " sitters ". In the seasons of 1913, 1914 and 1920 J. W. scored over 2,000 runs and took over 100 wickets and it is worthy of mention that in 1923 he was one of the first four batsmen against Hampshire at Southampton to score a century each, which is extremely rare in the annals of the game. Alas, he never enjoyed robust health, and his bones being very brittle, he was very prone to injury: otherwise his record would have been infinitely greater.There has rarely been a more charming and modest man and cricketer, always helpful and encouraging to others. As a batsman he was never sensational, but his artistry was supreme and will never be forgotten by those who were fortunate enough to see it. He was a lovable character, a true friend and all who knew J. W. will feel his death deeply and cherish his memory.

Test debut Australia v England at Sydney, Dec 15-21, 1911
Last Test England v Australia at Nottingham, Jun 12-15, 1926
First-class span 1909-1936

Frank Rowbotham Foster (1889-1958) Test Cap No:171

© En.wikipedia.org
Full name Frank Rowbotham Foster
Born January 31, 1889, Deritend, Birmingham, Warwickshire
Died May 3, 1958, Northampton (aged 69 years 92 days)
Major teams England, Warwickshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Left-arm fast-medium

Profile
© amazon.co.uk
© En.wikipedia.org
A fine allrounder, a superb medium fast left arm bowler, and a natural hitter. He is best remembered, perhaps for his partnership with Sid Barnes on the 1911-12 Ashes tour, where their pairing was all but unstoppable. His bowling was characterised by pace off the pitch, good length, and generally a leg stump line, backed by a packed leg-side field. He bowled mostly left arm round with considerable swing, and could break the ball back to hit the stumps, but most of his victims were caught in the leg trap. He was at his best when partnered with "Tiger" Smith, his county wicket-keeper, who made some astonishing leg side stumpings from his bowling. He was a free hitter with the bat, but based on sound foundations. He attacked the bowling from the outset, and his finest innings was possibly his triple hundred in a day for his county (a county record that stood until passed by LaraÕs 501). He had contemplated giving up first-class cricket in 1911, but on changing his mind, captained Warwickshire to their first Championship. Only 25 when cricket halted for the first world war, his career was ended by a war-time motor-cycle accident. "..there was about all his cricket an atmosphere of supreme confidence and inexhaustible vitality" wrote HS Altham.

Test debut Australia v England at Sydney, Dec 15-21, 1911
Last Test England v Australia at The Oval, Aug 19-22, 1912
First-class span 1908-1914

John W Henry Tyler Douglas (1882-1930) Test Cap No:170

 © Getty image
Full name John W Henry Tyler Douglas
Born September 3, 1882, Clapton, London
Died December 19, 1930, seven miles south of the Laeso Trindel Lightship,
Denmark (aged 48 years 107 days)
Major teams England, Essex, London County
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast-medium

Profile
 Johnny Douglas in the nets
 © Getty Images
Johnny Douglas was said to be the fittest cricketer of his day. The body was taut and muscular. He would not have been remotely out of place in a 21st-century dressing room where a player's physical condition is too easily a fetish rather than a healthy consideration. Douglas looked more like a boxer than a Test allrounder. And that was what he was, of course. Those who yawned at his unwaveringly wearisome batting approach argued with some validity that he was worth watching only when he stepped into the ring.

That was a cutting comment on someone who captained his country at cricket and led it to success against the Australians before the First World War. Yet he was never a batsman to ignite a schoolboy's imagination or stir a wing-collared Edwardian scribe to flights of purple prose.One of the endless fascinations of cricket is the extent of dichotomy among its practitioners. It is the sport in which the brawny blacksmith, romantic icon of rural rampage, does not bowl fast at all but instead pedantically blocks out the last half-hour to earn an honourable draw. It is the bespectacled accountant, pallid of features and delicate of forearm, who crashes four boundaries in an over. In Douglas's case he batted as if losing a competitive stroll with a tortoise - and flung his fists in ferocious combinations of punches to excite black-tied audiences, baying for blood after port, at the National Sporting Club.