Wednesday, February 24

John Herbert King (1871-1946) Test Cap No:160

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Full name John Herbert King
Born April 16, 1871, Lutterworth, Leicestershire
Died November 18, 1946, Denbigh, Wales (aged 75 years 216 days)
Major teams England, Leicestershire
Batting style Left-hand bat
Bowling style Left-arm medium
Other Umpire

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© Getty image
John King's career extended more than 30 seasons, and even when he finally retire at the age of 54, he continued his association with the game as a first-class umpire for another 11 years. He was a good player of fast bowling, and one who improved with age. He scored two double hundreds - the first in 1914 when 43, the second in 1923 aged 52. He was also a canny legspinner (he took over 1200 wickets) who varied his pace from slow to brisk medium. In his one Test - against Australia in 1909 when 38 - he rather strangely opened the bowling, taking 1 for 99 but having Ransford and Trumper dropped in the same over. In that match he scored 60 in the first innings and was then was unceremoniously dumped after that one outing. In 1906 he was given out `hit the ball twice' against Surrey at The Oval when he stopped the ball rolling into his stumps, and then tried to run a single, the last such dismissal in England.

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John Herbert King, one of the best left-handed players of his day, died on November 21, aged 75. Born on April 16, 1871, he first appeared for Leicestershire in 1895, but did not assist the side regularly until 1899. As a batsman he displayed much confidence against fast bowling, being particularly effective in cutting and driving. A slow or medium-paced bowler, with a puzzling flight and good length, he required careful watching, while his slip fielding often reached a high standard. In first-class cricket he made over 25,000 runs and took more than 1,200 wickets; in 1912 his aggregates were 1,074, average 22.85, and 130 average 17.63. In the match against Northamptonshire at Leicester in 1913 he made 111 in the first innings and 100 not out in the second. A year later he carried out his bat for 227 against Worcestershire, and in the game with Hampshire at Leicester in 1923, when fifty-two years of age, he scored 205.

He may be said to have been unlucky not to have appeared for England in more than one Test--that against Australia at Lord's in 1909, when he scored 60 and 4 and took only one wicket when opening the bowling with George Hirst. Perhaps his best performance was for the Players at Lord's in 1904. Substitute for J.T Tyldesley, injured, because, as a member of the ground staff, he was at hand when the game was due to start, he played two great innings, 104 and 109 not out, the only instance of a professional making two separate 100's in this match at Lord's, as R. E. Foster and K. S. Duleepsinhji did for the Gentlemen. Two years later at The Oval for the Players he scored 89 not out and 88 and took two wickets. Among his best bowling feats were eight wickets for 17 runs (including seven without the cost of a run in twenty balls) against Yorkshire in 1911, and two hat-tricks--against Sussex at Hove in 1903, and against Somerset at Weston-super-Mare in 1920.An unusual experience befell King at The Oval in May 1906 when playing against Surrey. Having hit the ball a second time in defence of his wicket, he ran, and on appeal was given out hit the ball twice. For some years he was a first-class umpire

Only Test England v Australia at Lord's, Jun 14-16, 1909
First-class span 1895-1909

George Joseph Thompson (1877-1943) Test Cap No:159

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Full name George Joseph Thompson
Born October 27, 1877, Cogenhoe, Northampton
Died March 3, 1943, Clifton, Bristol (aged 65 years 127 days)
Major teams England, Auckland, Northamptonshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast-medium
Other Umpire, Coach

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George Joseph Thompson, died on March 3 at Bristol in his 67th year. To him largely belonged the credit of raising Northamptonshire to the first class in 1905, and he was recoginsed as the greatest player the county ever produced. After playing in the Wellingborough Grammar School XI, Thompson, when 17 years of age, appeared first for the county in 1895, before Northamptonshire ranked in the second-class competition. When that advance was made Thompson in 1901 and again in 1902 took over a hundred wickets and in batting averaged 36: In 1903, with 92 wickets for ten runs apiece and 33 as batting average,

Joseph Humphries (1876-1946) Test Cap No.158

Full name Joseph Humphries
Born May 19, 1876, Stonebroom, Derbyshire
Died May 7, 1946, Chesterfield, Derbyshire (aged 69 years 353 days)
Major teams England, Derbyshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Fielding position Wicketkeeper

Profile
Joseph Humphries (19 May 1876 – 7 May 1946) was an English cricketer who played three Test matches for England on their tour to Australia in 1907-08 and for Derbyshire County Cricket Club and the Marylebone Cricket Club between 1899 and 1914.Humphries was born in Stonebroom, Derbyshire,the son of John Thomas Humphries and his wife Eliza. His father was a coal miner.

Humphries was a wicket-keeper, who made his first-class debut for Derbyshire in the 1899 season. However with William Storer in place, he did not earn a regular place in the Derbyshire side until the 1902 season. Humphries was party to a dramatic finish in the second Test in Melbourne in January 1908, when as tailender he put on 34, and England won by 1 wicket to avoid a tie.[2] His career ended with the start of the First World War.Humphries died in Chesterfield, Derbyshire, at the age of nearly 70.

Test debut Australia v England at Melbourne, Jan 1-7, 1908
Last Test Australia v England at Melbourne, Feb 7-11, 1908
First-class span 1899-1914

John Berry Jack Hobbs (1882-1963) Test Cap No.157

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Full name John Berry Hobbs
Born December 16, 1882, Cambridge
Died December 21, 1963, Hove, Sussex (aged 81 years 5 days)
Major teams England, Maharaj Kumar of Vizianagram's XI, Surrey
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium

Profile
© Getty image
Sir John Berry Jack Hobbs  was an English professional cricketer who played for Surrey from 1905 to 1934 and for England in 61 Test matches between 1908 and 1930. Known as "The Master", Hobbs is regarded by critics as one of the greatest batsmen in the history of cricket. He is the leading run-scorer and century-maker in first-class cricket, with 61,760 runs and 199 centuries.[notes 1] A right-handed batsman and an occasional right-arm medium pace bowler, Hobbs also excelled as a fielder, particularly in the position of cover point.

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Jack Hobbs and Herbert Sutcliffe,
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Born into poverty in 1882, Hobbs wished to pursue a career in cricket from an early age. His early batting was undistinguished but a sudden improvement in 1901 brought him to the attention of local teams. Following the death of his father, he successfully applied to join Surrey, with the support of England batsman Tom Hayward. His reputation grew and when he qualified to play for Surrey, he scored 88 on his first-class debut and a century in his next game. Over the following seasons, he established himself in the Surrey team and by 1907–08 was playing Test cricket for England. He scored 83 in his first Test, and his international career continued until 1930. After some mixed Test performances, Hobbs' success against South African googly bowlers meant that his place was secure, and in 1911–12, he scored three centuries in the series against Australia. Afterwards, he was regarded as the best batsman in the world until the mid-1920s. In county cricket, Hobbs developed an attractive, attacking style of play where he scored quickly, and he was very successful in the years approaching the First World War. After the war, Hobbs was again successful against Australia, but his career was threatened by appendicitis which caused him to miss most of the 1921 season. When he returned, he was more cautious as a batsmen and concentrated on safer, more defensive play. Yet he continued to be successful in Test and domestic cricket.

Richard Alfred Young (1885-1968) Test Cap No:156

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Full name Richard Alfred Young
Born September 16, 1885, Dharwar, India
Died July 1, 1968, Hastings, Sussex (aged 82 years 289 days)
Major teams England, Cambridge University, Sussex
Batting style Right-hand bat
Fielding position Wicketkeeper

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Dick Young was one of the few spectacled players to represent England at both cricket and Association football. He established a high reputation as a wicketkeeper and batsman while in the XI at Repton from 1901 to 1904, heading the averages in 1902 when Wisden described him as out and away the best batsman at the school. He captained the side in the last two seasons. A consistent and reliable batsman, strong on the leg-side and in driving to the off, he gained a Blue as a Freshman at Cambridge in 1905 and also played in the University matches of the following three seasons.

Kenneth Lotherington Hutchings (1882-1916) Test Cap No:155

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Full name Kenneth Lotherington Hutchings
Born December 7, 1882, Southborough, Kent
Died September 3, 1916, Ginchy, France (aged 33 years 271 days)
Major teams England, Kent
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast

Profile
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© en.wikipedia.org
Lieut. Kenneth Lotherington Hutchings (King's Liverpool Regiment, attached to Welsh Regiment) was killed in action during the first week in September. He was struck by a shell, death being instantaneous. Of all the cricketers who have fallen in the War he may fairly be described as the most famous.

Kenneth Lotherington Hutchings did not fulfil all the hopes formed of him, but at his best he was one of the most remarkable batsmen seen in this generation. Those who follow cricket will not need to be reminded of the sensation caused by his play in 1906--the year in which Kent, for the first time in modern days, came out as Champion County. To the triumph of the side no one contributed more than Hutchings. It is true that he fell a little below C. J. Burnup in the averages, but he played with amazing brilliancy, getting four 100's in county matches, and scoring 1,358 runs. His success astonished the public, but it was scarcely a surprise to those who had watched him from his school days. He had a great career at Tonbridge, being in the eleven for five years, and heading the batting for three seasons in succession. The first evidence of his ability in county cricket was given when, in 1903, he scored 106 for Kent against Somerset at Taunton. His batting in 1906 took him at once to the top of the tree, and on all hands he was regarded as an England cricketer. Unfortunately he never again reached quite the level of his great season. From time to time he did brilliant things, playing especially well in 1909 and 1910, but in 1912 he lost his form and dropped out of the Kent eleven.

Joseph Hardstaff (1882-1947) Test Cap No:154

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Full name Joseph Hardstaff
Born November 9, 1882, Kirkby-in-Ashfield, Nottinghamshire
Died April 2, 1947, Nuncargate, Nottinghamshire (aged 64 years 144 days)
Major teams England, Nottinghamshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast-medium

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As Umpire Joe Hardstaff
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Joe Hardstaff senior was rather short and strongly built and played for Nottinghamshire from 1902 to 1924, scoring altogether in first-class cricket 17,146 runs, average 31.34. He toured Australia in 1907-08, when A. O. Jones, his county captain, led the English side, and he met with marked success, averaging over 51 in all matches, with much the highest aggregate--1,384, and his three centuries surpassed the efforts of all his colleagues. His average in the five Tests was 31.10, only George Gunn and Jack Hobbs doing better. Free in stroke play all round the wicket, he could put up a stout defence in a way quite in keeping with the best of Nottinghamshire batsmen. He helped Nottinghamshire to carry off the Championship in 1907, and by scoring 124 not out and 48 against the South African team, influenced his choice for the tour in Australia; Nottinghamshire won the match by five wickets. A brilliant field, especially in the deep, he occasionally bowled rather fast but with moderate success. Sir Home Gordon credits him with 182 catches.

Hardstaff soon became a favourite with the Australian spectators, who showed their appreciation by calling him Hot Stuff. He died while his son was on the way home from Australia. The Hardstaffs provide the only case of a father and son representing England in Australia; but Fred Tate played in one Test match in England against Australia twenty-two years before his son, Maurice Tate, first went to Australia in 1924. After retiring from the Nottinghamshire team, Hardstaff senior became a popular first-class umpire and stood in several Test matches. He would probably have officiated in many more but for the fact that he was not allowed to umpire when young Hardstaff was playing in such games. Of course, he could not officiate when Nottinghampshire were engaged, and so he saw comparatively little of his son as a player.

Test debut England v West Indies at The Oval, Aug 11-14, 1928
Last Test England v South Africa at The Oval, Aug 17-20, 1935

George Gunn (1879-1958) Test Cap No:153

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Full name George Gunn
Born June 13, 1879, Hucknall Torkard, Nottinghamshire
Died June 29, 1958, Tylers Green, Cuckfield, Sussex (aged 79 years 16 days)
Major teams England, Nottinghamshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm bowler

Profile
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George Gunn, who died in his sleep at Tylers Green, Sussex, on June 28, aged 79, was probably the greatest batsman who played for Nottinghamshire. Had he possessed a different temperament he would doubtless have improved upon his splendid records, for his skill and judgement were such that he made batting successfully against first-class bowlers appear the easiest thing imaginable. Not only did he show complete mastery in the art of back-play, but he frequently got right in front of his wicket and walked down the pitch to meet the ball no matter what type of bowler he was facing. Rarely when he left his ground in this way did his skill betray him and yet, though obviously so completely at home that he could have done almost anything with the ball, he would make a stroke which sent it tamely to the bowler, to mid-off or to mid-on. In match after match this practice of merely killing the ball was indulged in to such an extent as to become almost an obsession. It appeared to furnish Gunn with complete satisfaction, but it occasioned considerable annoyance to spectators who knew that, if he wished, he could score both without undue effort and as rapidly as anybody.

Neville Alexander Knox (1884-1935) Test Cap No:152

Full name Neville Alexander Knox
Born October 10, 1884, Clapham, London
Died March 3, 1935, Southborough, Surbiton, Surrey (aged 50 years 144 days)
Major teams England, Surrey
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast

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Major Neville Alexander Knox, died at Surbiton, Surrey on March 3, at the age of 50. His cricketing career was brief but brilliant. Born on October 10, 1884, he played both cricket and Rugby Football for Dulwich College. He appeared for Surrey against Lancashire in 1904 and took four wickets. Next season he rose to fame in remarkable fashion and had a big share in winning back for Surrey, after a year of extreme depression, a high position among the counties.

John Cabourn Hartley (1874-1963) Test Cap No:151

Full name John Cabourn Hartley
Born November 15, 1874, Lincoln
Died March 8, 1963, Woodhall Spa, Lincolnshire (aged 88 years 113 days)
Major teams England, Oxford University, Sussex
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak

Profile
Colonel John Cabourn Hartley, who died on March 8, aged 88, played as a slow-medium bowler for Oxford University and England. In the Tonbridge XI of 1893, he gained a Blue at Oxford in 1896 and the following year. In the first match against Cambridge he bore a leading part in a victory by four wickets, scoring 43 and taking 11 wickets for 239. When dismissing eight men on the opening day for 161 runs, he bowled W. G. Grace, junior, son of the great Doctor, for the first of his two ducks in the match. Hartley went to America with Frank Mitchell's team in 1893 and, as a member of P. F. Warner's M.C.C. side in South Africa in 1905-06, took part without much success in two Test matches. He later played occasionally for Sussex. He served in the South African War and the First World War, being twice wounded and four times mentioned in dispatches.

Test debut South Africa v England at Johannesburg, Mar 10-14, 1906
Last Test South Africa v England at Cape Town, Mar 30-Apr 2, 1906
First-class span 1895-1926

Leonard James Moon (1878-1916) Test Cap No:150

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Full name Leonard James Moon
Born February 9, 1878, Kensington, London
Died November 23, 1916, near Karasouli, Salonica, Greece (aged 38 years 288 days)
Major teams England, Cambridge University, Middlesex
Batting style Right-hand bat
Fielding position Wicketkeeper

Profile
Second Lieutenant Leonard James Moon died of wounds on November 23. He was in the Westminster XI in 1894 and two following seasons, heading the averages with 25.71 in 1895 and being second in 1896 with 46.69. In the last-mentioned year he played an innings of 57 against Charterhouse.

Walter Scott Lees (1875-1924) Test Cap No:149

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Full name Walter Scott Lees
Born December 25, 1875, Sowerby Bridge, Yorkshire
Died September 10, 1924, West Hartlepool, Co Durham (aged 48 years 260 days)
Major teams England, London County, Surrey
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium-fast

Profile
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Walter Lees - One of the many Yorkshire cricketers who have won a reputation outside their own county, Lees was born on the 25th December, 1876, and is thus still on the right side of thirty. To him the season of 1905 was indeed a memorable one as from being a good bowler, but nothing more, he took a sudden jump to the top of the tree. Not often has a bowler after being several years before the public made a more remarkable advance. So fine and consistent was his work all through the summer that he could regard himself as very unlucky in not playing for England in the Test Matches. He was one of the players from whom the team for the first game at Nottingham had to be picked, but on the morning of the match it was his ill-fortune to have to stand down, and as events turned out he never had another chance. That on his form his claims were very strong there can be no question, and it must more than once have been a nice point between him and Arnold. However, by reason perhaps of his superior batting, Arnold, even at the Oval, was given the preference. Still though he missed the most coveted distinction that can be earned in the cricket field, Lees was undoubtedly one of the very best bowlers in 1905. He was in form at the beginning of May and except for a match or two, when a damaged foot troubled him, he never looked back, taking wickets week after week, and showing little sign of the immense amount of work he got through. To him more than anyone else Surrey owed their recovery from the depression and disasters of the previous season.