Tuesday, February 23

Ernest George Hayes (1876-1953) Test Cap No:148

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Full name Ernest George Hayes
Born November 6, 1876, Peckham, London
Died December 2, 1953, West Dulwich, London (aged 77 years 26 days)
Major teams England, Leicestershire, London County, Surrey
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak
Other Coach

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Ernest George Hayes, who died at his home at Norwood on December 2--the date of the Surrey dinner to celebrate the winning of the County Championship at which he was to have been an honoured guest--aged 77, was among the finest batsmen of his day.

Frederick Luther Fane (1875-1960) Test Cap No:147

© Wisden Cricket Monthly
Full name Frederick Luther Fane
Born April 27, 1875, Curragh Camp, Co Kildare, Ireland
Died November 27, 1960, Kelvedon Hatch, Brentwood, Essex (aged 85 years 214 days)
Major teams England, Essex, London County, Oxford University
Batting style Right-hand bat

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Frederick Fane took over as England captain in Australia in 1907-08 when Arthur Jones was injured, and also led England in his last two Test appearances, in South Africa two years later. Fane was a good-looking front-foot player whose one Test century came at Johannesburg in 1905-06, a match that England nonetheless lost comfortably. He was also Jack Hobbs's opening partner in Hobbs's first Test, at Melbourne in 1907-08. In that match, Fane top-scored in the second innings as England squeaked home by one wicket. Fane also represented Essex with distinction for 20 years, and scored close to 20,000 first-class runs.

Frederick Luther Fane, who died on November 27, aged 85, was a prominent figure in cricket for some twenty years before the First World War. Owing to a similarity of initials, Wisden reported his death when he was 79. The man concerned was Francis L. Fane, his cousin. By a coincidence, Mr. Fane's father also once read his own obituary. Educated at Charterhouse, Frederick Fane was in the X1 from 1892 to 1894, and after coming down from Oxford, where he gained a Blue in 1897 and the following year, he played a good deal for Essex, being captain from 1904 to 1906. His best season for the county was that of 1906 when he scored 1,572 runs, average 34. In 1899 he put together his highest innings, 207 against Leicestershire. At Leyton in 1905, when Essex beat the Australians by 19 runs, Fane ended the match with a remarkable catch at a position approximating to deep long-stop where, with Buckenham bowling very fast, he had placed himself to save possible byes. In the 1907-8 tour of Australia, he captained the M.C.C. side in the first three Test matches when A. O. Jones fell ill. During that tour he scored 774 runs, average 33, hitting 101 against New South Wales. Fane also went to South Africa in 1905-6 and 1909-10, to New Zealand in 1902-3 and the West Indies in 1902. Altogether he played in 14 Test matches.

Test debut South Africa v England at Johannesburg, Jan 2-4, 1906
Last Test South Africa v England at Cape Town, Mar 11-14, 1910
First-class span 1895-1924

John Neville Crawford (1886-1963) Test Cap No:146

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Full name John Neville Crawford
Born December 1, 1886, Cane Hill, Surrey
Died May 2, 1963, Epsom, Surrey (aged 76 years 152 days)
Major teams England, Otago, South Australia, Surrey, Wellington
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium, Right-arm offbreak

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John Neville "Jack" Crawford was one the best allrounders of his era, although he habitually played in spectacles. Son of the Rev. J. C. Crawford and nephew of Major F. F. Crawford, both of whom played for Kent, he created such a reputation as a batsman and a bowler of varying pace at Repton that he was invited to play for Surrey in 1904 at the age of 17. He was an immediate allround success and he and H.C. McDonell bowled unchanged through both innings of Gloucestershire at Cheltenham, Crawford taking 10 for 78 and his fellow amateur 10 for 89.

Jack Crawford appeared regularly for Surrey from 1906 till 1909. Twice in succession he completed the cricketers' double and in 1908 failed to do so a third time by two wickets. During this period he made twelve appearances for England, going to South Africa in 1905-06 and to Australia in 1907-08, when he headed the Test bowling averages with 30 wickets for 24.79 runs each. After a mid-season dispute with Surrey in 1909 he settled in Australia, playing with distinction for South Australia and paying a visit to New Zealand with an Australian XI, in 1914. In the course of this tour he played an extraordinary innings in a two-day fixture with a South Canterbury XV at Temuka. Of a total of 922 for 9, he obtained 354 -- 264 of them from fourteen 6's and forty-five 4's -- in five and a half hours. He and Victor Trumper put on 298 in 69 minutes for the eighth wicket and he and Monty Noble at one point added 50 in nine minutes.

Reginald Herbert Spooner (1880-1961) Test Cap No:145

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Full name Reginald Herbert Spooner
Born October 21, 1880, Litherland, Lancashire
Died October 2, 1961, Lincoln (aged 80 years 346 days)
Major teams England, Lancashire
Batting style Right-hand bat

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Reginald Herbert Spooner, whose name is linked with the greatest batsmen of Edwardian England, died in a nursing home at Lincoln on October 2, after a few weeks' illness, at the age of 80. One of the most beautiful stroke-makers known to the game, he adorned the cricketing scene as a player for Lancashire and England in an age of giants, when quality, style and skill were wedded as perhaps at no other time.

He was born near Liverpool on October 21, 1880, and was educated at Marlborough, where he excelled as an outstanding schoolboy sportsman and established a fine reputation as a batsman of maturity and dominance. He was in the XI for three years from 1897 to 1899, and after scoring 139 against Rugby at Lord's in 1898, he ended his school career in a blaze of triumph with 926 runs in 1899 at an average of 71.23, including innings of 69 and 198 against Rugby; he was captain of Marlborough that year, and he was at once marked out as a potentially great player. For Lancashire II at the age of 18 he scored a great 158 against Surrey II at Old Trafford, and within a few weeks made his debut in first-class cricket, appearing against Middlesex at Lord's in 1899 with scores of 44 and 83. He made an immediate impression, which was fully justified in later years, as an elegant artist who could open the innings not as a craftsman but as a polished and ingenious stroke-player who was loved and admired by crowds on every ground.

Walter Brearley (1876-1937) Test Cap No:144

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Full name Walter Brearley
Born March 11, 1876, Bolton, Lancashire
Died January 30, 1937, Marylebone, London (aged 60 years 325 days)
Major teams England, Lancashire, London County
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast

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Walter Brearley died after an operation in Middlesex Hospital on January 30. During ten years from 1902 when he first played for Lancashire, he stood out as a conspicuous figure on the cricket field and until last season he kept up his enthusiastic love for the game, often going to the nets at Lord's for hearty practice and every April taking a prominent part in the instruction of young public schoolboys at headquarters. A fast right-hand bowler of the highest class, Walter Brearley took a short run up to the crease, with a rolling gait and body swing for imparting pace. He delivered the ball in a manner not unlike that of Arthur Mold, his predecessor in the Lancashire eleven.Born on March 11, 1876, he was highly successful with the Bolton and Manchester clubs before appearing in county cricket when 26 years of age. Altogether for Lancashire he took 690 wickets at a cost of 18 runs apiece, and in first-class cricket his record was 844 at 19.31. He met with special success in the great local struggles with Yorkshire and in the fourteen matches played between these counties from 1903 to 1911 he dismissed 125 batsmen at 16 runs each.

During his most effective year in 1908, 163 wickets fell to him, but he was never in better form than in 1905 when he played for England against Australia at Old Trafford and the Oval. He found special pleasure in making extra efforts to dismiss some batsmen, and, that season, when playing for England, the Gentlemen and Lancashire, he disposed of Victor Trumper no fewer than six times. Walter Brearley also played for England against Australia at Leeds in 1909 and once against South Africa during the Triangular Tournament in 1912.

Arnold Warren(1875-1951)Test Cap No:143

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Full name Arnold Warren
Born April 2, 1875, Codnor Park, Derbyshire
Died September 3, 1951, Codnor, Derbyshire (aged 76 years 154 days)
Major teams England, Derbyshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast

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Arnold Warren was a tall right-arm fast bowler whose approach to the wicket came courtesy of a long, bounding run. But he was fast, reckoned by many to be the fastest of his generation. He was hampered by playing for an unfashionable county, but he was the first man to take 100 wickets in a season for Derbyshire (1904). He made a solid debut against Australia in the third Test at Headingely in 1905, taking 5 for 57 and 1 for 56 - including Victor Trumper twice - but he was not asked again. As a batsman he liked to hit, and he had a first-class hundred to his name. In 1910 against Warwickshire at Blackwell he scored 123 in under three hours in a ninth-wicket stand of 283, which remains a world record.

Only TestEngland v Australia at Leeds, Jul 3-5, 1905
First-class span 1897-1905

David Denton (1874-1950) Test Cap No:142

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Full name David Denton
Born July 4, 1874, Thornes, Wakefield, Yorkshire
Died February 16, 1950, Thornes, Wakefield, Yorkshire (aged 75 years 227 days)
Major teams England, Yorkshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium-fast
Other Umpire

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David "Lucky" Denton, one of the liveliest of batsmen and a superb field, died suddenly at his home at Wakefield on February 17. He was 75.Denton made his first appearance for Yorkshire in 1894 and concluded his career as an active cricketer in 1920. He did little as a batsman when he first played with the county, but in the following year, coming off early in the summer against both Cambridge University and Lancashire, he made his place secure. For twenty-one seasons his record exceeded 1,000 runs, his aggregate reaching 2,000 in five summers, and in 1905 amounting to 2,405, with an average of 42. For twenty years this stood as the highest Yorkshire aggregate until surpassed by Herbert Sutcliffe.

Possessed of very flexible wrists, Denton made strokes all round the wicket with considerable hitting power, while he played forward so hard that he always made the ball travel. On fast wickets he seized every opening to score on the off side, cutting in particularly brilliant fashion, and when the ground was slow he employed the pull and the hook with fine effect. The force of his strokes was surprising as he was below medium height and lightly built. He batted in exceptionally good style and never lost any time in getting to work. Going out for runs immediately he arrived at the wicket, he naturally gave many chances and was sometimes referred to as the luckiest of cricketers. Certainly he often enjoyed a liberal share of good fortune, but if let off he would settle down to hitting as clean and well-timed as it was continuous.

Albert Ernest Knight (1872-1946) Test Cap No:141

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Full name Albert Ernest Knight
Born October 8, 1872, Leicester
Died April 25, 1946, Edmonton, Middlesex (aged 73 years 199 days)
Major teams England, Leicestershire, London County
Batting style Right-hand bat

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Albert Ernest Knight, who died in April 1946, aged 72, was a sound batsman and an excellent field at cover-point. He did fine service for Leicestershire from 1895 to 1912, when he went to Highgate School as coach. During that period he scored nearly 20,000 runs at an average of 29.24. Knight possessed no exceptional gifts as a cricketer, but, studious and painstaking, made himself a first-rate batsman of the old style. Driving particularly well to the off and using the square-cut with good effect, he pulled or hooked scarcely at all. In 1899--his first big year--he made 1,246 runs, and for eight consecutive seasons reached his thousand. At his best in 1903, when, sixth in the general first-class averages, his aggregate was 1,835, average 45. Among his most notable successes were 229 not out at Worcester, 144 not out at Trent Bridge, 144 at The Oval, 127 against Surrey at Leicester, and a faultless 139 for Players against Gentlemen at Lord's. Curiously enough, during that summer Leicestershire gained only one victory in the County Championship. In the autumn of 1903 Knight went to Australia in the M.C.C. team captained by P. F. Warner. Figuring in three of the five Test matches, Knight scored 70 not out at Sydney in the fourth game of the series, and on the same ground made 104 against New South Wales, but, on the whole, scarcely realised expectations.

The following summer found him again in great form with an aggregate of 1,412, an average of 40, and five separate three-figure innings to his credit, including 203 against M.C.C. at Lord's. He wrote a book entitled The Complete Cricketer, grandiose in style, containing much startling metaphor.

Test debut Australia v England at Melbourne, Jan 1-5, 1904
Last Test Australia v England at Melbourne, Mar 5-8, 1904
First-class span 1895-1904

Arthur Fielder (1877-1949) Test Cap No:140

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Full name Arthur Fielder
Born July 19, 1877, Plaxtol, Tonbridge, Kent
Died August 30, 1949, Lambeth, London (aged 72 years 42 days)
Major teams England, Kent
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast

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Fielder,Arthur,Kent fast bowler for twelve years immediately prior to the first World War, died in St. Thomas's Hospital, London, on August 30, aged 71. He enjoyed a distinction possessed by no other cricketer: in a Gentlemen v. Players match at Lord's, he took all ten wickets in an innings. This feat he accomplished in 1906 when, despite his great achievement, the Gentlemen won a fine game by 45 runs. Taking in first-class matches that season 186 wickets for 20 runs apiece, Fielder did much towards enabling Kent, for the first time, to carry off the Championship.

Albert Edward Relf (1874-1937) Test Cap No:139

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Full name Albert Edward Relf
Born June 26, 1874, Burwash, Sussex
Died March 26, 1937, Wellington College, Crowthorne, Berkshire (aged 62 years 273 days)
Major teams England, Auckland, London County, Sussex
Batting style Right-hand bat

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Albert Edward Relf, one of the best all-round cricketers of his time and extremely popular man, shot himself on March 26. The cause for such a sad act was attributed to poor health and depression due to the serious illness of his wife; he died a wealthy man.After making a name with Norfolk, Albert Relf played first for Sussex, the county of his birth, in 1900, when in his 26th year, and he was one of the mainstays of his side twenty-one years later, when, at Horsham, he scored 153 against Leicestershire. After the War, owing to his coaching duties at Wellington, where he succeeded his father, he could not play regularly until the School holidays. In 1921 he came out second in the batting and first in the bowling averages; he took his benefit match and finished his county career.

Reginald Erskine Foster (1878-1914) Test Cap No:138

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Full name Reginald Erskine Foster
Born April 16, 1878, Malvern, Worcestershire
Died May 13, 1914, Brompton, Kensington, London (aged 36 years 27 days)
Major teams England, Oxford University, Worcestershire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast

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Seven Foster brothers played for Worcestershire in the years before World War 1, but RE (Tip) was the finest cricketer. The only man to captain England at football and cricket, Tip Foster played only eight Tests, but he certainly made his mark with comfortably the highest score by a Test debutant, a mighty 287 at Sydney in 1903-04. It also remains the highest score by an Englishman in Australia. He played only one full season of county cricket, in 1901, when he made 2128 runs at 50.66. The previous year he had set the record for the highest score in the Varsity match (171), and scored a hundred in each innings in the Gentlemen v Players clash. Foster was a refined middle-order batsman with a touch of the Dexters, who graduated to the captaincy against South Africa in 1907 - he had to decline the offer to lead England in Australia that winter because of business commitments. He won six football caps, and he and all six of his brothers played for Worcestershire. He suffered from diabetes, and was just 36 when he died in 1914.

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Reginald Erskine Foster died at his home in London on May 13, 1914. He was born at Malvern on April 16, 1878. Mr Foster's death from diabetes at the age of 36 came as a great shock to the cricket world, but was no surprise to his intimate friends. His health broke down in the summer of 1913, and a visit to South Africa did him no permanent good. He had not reached the age at which, by means of rigid dieting, diabetes can sometimes be kept in check. He was one of the pre-eminently great batsmen of his day, ranking with MacLaren, Fry, Jackson, Tom Hayward and Tyldesley, among those who stood nearest to Ranjitsinhji. Of all the fine batsmen who learnt the game at Malvern he was incontestably the best and his record for Oxford in 1900 has never been equalled in University cricket. In Wisden's Almanack for 1913,

Mr Foster's doings in the cricket field were set out in full detail, so one need not in this notice of him go at any length into figures. Three of his feats stand out above all the rest--his 171 against Cambridge at Lord's in 1900, his 102 not out and 136 for the Gentlemen against the Players at Lord's ten days later, and, his 287 for MCC's England Eleven against Australia at Sydney in December, 1903. This 287 remains the record innings in Test match cricket. Mr Foster was the first batsman to make two separate hundreds in a Gentlemen and Players' match, and the feat has only once been repeated -- by JH King for the Players at Lord's in 1904. Curiously enough, but Mr Foster and King were playing in the big match for the first time. It is a strange fact that Mr Foster never played for England against Australia in this country. The Australians were not here in either 1900 or 1901 -- his two great seasons. This was very unfortunate for him, as in both those years he would have been one of the first men chosen for Test matches.

Bernard James Tindal Bosanquet (1877-1936) Test Cap No:137

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Full name Bernard James Tindal Bosanquet
Born October 13, 1877, Bulls Cross, Enfield, Middlesex
Died October 12, 1936, Wykehurst, Ewhurst, Surrey (aged 58 years 365 days)
Major teams England, Middlesex, Oxford University
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak googly

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Bernard Bosanquet, died at his home in Surrey on October 12, the day before the 59th anniversary of his birth. A capable allround cricketer at Eton and Oxford and also for Middlesex, Bosanquet enjoyed chief claim to fame as the acknowledged inventor of the googly. In the 1925 issue of Wisden there was reproduced an article from The Morning Post in which Bosanquet described all about the discovery of what he termed in the heading "The Scapegoat of Cricket". He wrote, Poor old googly! It has been subjected to ridicule, abuse, contempt, incredulity, and survived them all. Deficiencies existing at the present day are attributed to the influence of the googly. If the standard of bowling falls off it is because too many cricketers devote their time to trying to master it... If batsmen display a marked inability to hit the ball on the off-side or anywhere in front of the wicket and stand in apologetic attitudes before the wicket, it is said that the googly has made it impossible for them to attempt the old aggressive attitude and make the scoring strokes.

Edward George Arnold (1876-1942) Test Cap No:136

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Full name Edward George Arnold
Born November 7, 1876, Withycombe Raleigh, Exmouth, Devon
Died October 25, 1942, Worcester (aged 65 years 352 days)
Major teams England, London County, Worcestershire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium-fast

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Wisden described Ted Arnold in his obituary as "an allround cricketer of sterling merit". He was three times part of England teams that won Test series, notably that of Warner's 1903-4 Ashes tour. His debut on that tour was impressive - he removed the illustrious opening pair of Duff and Trumper with 9 on the board, and played an important role in England's win in the crucial fourth Test. His four first-innings wickets, and second-innings dismissal of Trumper more than compensated for his pair of ducks. More than any other player, Arnold was responsible for the elevation of Worcestershire to first-class status. His allround ability (18 first-class centuries, and close to 1000 county wickets) enabled his adopted county to take on any opponent.

Arnold bowled at medium pace or faster, varying his pace well, and moving the ball off the wicket. He used all his considerable height with an upright delivery, developing lift, particularly on rain-affected wickets where his bowling was particularly effective. He was one of the early exponents of swing bowling, following the example of Hirst, with an excellent away-swinger. He had a solid defence, and a range of powerful strokes, although his batting was not seen at its best in Tests. He usually fielded in the slips, where he had a safe pair of hands.

Test debut Australia v England at Sydney, Dec 11-17, 1903
Last Test England v South Africa at Leeds, Jul 29-31, 1907 
First-class span 1899-1913

Frederick William Tate (1867-1943) Test Cap No:135

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Full name Frederick William Tate
Born July 24, 1867, Brighton, Sussex
Died February 24,1943, Burgess Hill,Sussex (aged 75 years 215 days)
Major teams England, Sussex
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium

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Frederick William Tate, died at Burgess Hill, Sussex, on February 4, aged 75. He first played for Sussex in 1888, and not until 1905 did his career end. Subsequently he went to Derby as coach to the County Club and in 1921 to Trent College as professional coach. Two of his three sons played county cricket, Maurice, so well known with Sussex and England, and C. L. Tate, who played for Derbyshire and Warwickshire.

A slow to medium-paced right-hand bowler, with easy action and good command of length, Fred Tate took over 100 wickets in five different seasons. His great year came when he was 35, 180 wickets falling to him for less than 16 runs apiece in 1902. His full record in first-class cricket shows 1,324 wickets at an average cost of 21 runs apiece. He accomplished many good performances. When Hampshire were a second-class county he took nine wickets for 24 runs, and at Leicester in 1902 he again got nine wickets in an innings at a cost of 73 runs. Perhaps his best achievement was that year at Lord's when against Middlesex he dismissed fifteen men for 68 runs in a day. Other exceptional feats were five wickets for one run against Kent at Tonbridge in 1888 and seven for 17 against Gloucestershire at Bristol in 1891; and in 1901 he did the hat-trick against Surrey at the Oval. This was his benefit year and the match against Yorkshire at Hove brought him £1,051.

Lionel Charles Hamilton Palairet (1870-1933) Test Cap No:134

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Full name Lionel Charles Hamilton Palairet
Born May 27, 1870, Broughton East, Grange-over-Sands, Lancashire
Died March 27, 1933, Exmouth, Devon (aged 62 years 304 days)
Major teams England, Oxford University, Somerset
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium, Right-arm slow (underarm)

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Mr.Lionel Charles Himlton Palairet is a Somerset man by close associations, but by birth he belongs to Lancashire, having been born at Grange-over-Sands in that county on May 27, 1870. Though now less than twenty-three years of age, Palairet has served a long apprenticeship to cricket. In 1880 he was a member of the eleven at the Rev. S. Cornish's School at Walton Lodge, Clevedon, and on leaving there in 1884 he proceeded to Repton School. He gained his colours at Repton in 1886, and remained in the eleven for the three following seasons, being captain of the team in 1888 and 1889. During all this time his powers as a cricketer were gradually ripening, and in his last year at school he had a very fine record, averaging more than 29 runs per innings, and taking 56 wickets for a little over 12½ runs each. Going up to Oxford in October, 1889, he got into the University eleven in his first season, one of his best innings being 72 at Lord's against the M.C.C. and Ground. In a match of small scores, on a bad wicket, he only made 0 and 17 against Cambridge, but his record for Oxford was by no means bad -- 285 runs in fifteen innings, with an average of 19. In 1891 he was even less successful in the University match, being got rid of for 2 and 11, and in Oxford matches generally he came out with the modest average of 15.11. For Somerset, however, he batted in very different style, scoring 560 runs in ten matches, with an average of 31.

Charles Percy McGahey (1871-1935) Test Cap No:133

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Full name Charles Percy McGahey
Born February 12, 1871, Stepney, London
Died January 10, 1935, Whipps Cross, Leytonstone, Essex (aged 63 years 332 days)
Major teams England, Essex, London County
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak

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Charles Percy McGahey, the famous Essex batsman, died in Whipps Cross Hospital on January 10. His death was the result of an accident on Christmas Day when, slipping on a greasy pavement, he fell and damaged a finger. Septic poisoning ensued and proved fatal. Charles McGahey first appeared for Essex in 1893 when the county was second-class and not until 1921 did he retire. He was assistant secretary of the club for several years and captained the County eleven from 1907 to 1910, while from 1930 onwards he acted as official scorer for Essex.Just a natural hitter in club cricket when given a trial by Essex, he advanced slowly, but profited so much from practice against professional bowling provided by Mr. C. E. Green before each season at Leyton and experience in match play, as his form improved, that he became one of the best batsmen of his time.

During his long career he scored 20,723 runs with an average of 30 in first-class cricket and as a slow right-hand leg-break bowler he took 328 wickets at 31 runs each. Ready application of what he saw to his own use enabled McGahey to overcome his early faults and for some ten seasons he was one of the mainstays of the Essex team. Standing well over six feet, he played forward with great power and used this stroke even in defence of his wicket rather than wait to see what the ball would do. Essentially a hitter, he showed great strength in driving either to the off or the on and he punished any short ball with severity. Seldom did he cut. He was a good field in the slips or in the deep.

John Richmond Gunn (1876-1963) Test Cap No:132

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Full name John Richmond Gunn
Born July 19, 1876, Hucknall Torkard, Nottinghamshire
Died August 21, 1963, Basford, Nottinghamshire (aged 87 years 33 days)
Major teams England, London County, Nottinghamshire
Batting style Left-hand bat

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John Richmond Gunn, who died in hospital at Nottingham on August 21, aged 87, was a member of a celebrated Nottinghamshire cricketing family. Nephew of William Gunn and elder brother of George, he was uncle of G.V., all of whom, like himself, played for the county. A fine all-rounder, John Gunn made his first appearance for Nottinghamshire in 1896 and continued his professional career with the county till 1925. In that time he scored 24,601 runs, average 33.19, took 1,243 wickets at 24.50 runs each and held 233 catches.

Leonard Charles Braund (1875-1955) Test Cap No:131

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Full name Leonard Charles Braund
Born October 18, 1875, Clewer, Berkshire
Died December 23, 1955, Putney Common, London (aged 80 years 66 days)
Major teams England, London County, Somerset, Surrey
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak
Other Umpire

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Leonard Charles Braund, who died at his home in Fulham on December 22, aged 80, was one of the best-known professional all-rounders of his time and between 1902 and 1907 played in twenty-three matches for England. He enjoyed a long and distinguished career. After appearing occasionally for Surrey during three seasons, and when qualifying for Somerset, he profited from the experience of playing for London County with W. G. Grace. In 1899 against the Australians he scored 63 for an England XI on a bad pitch at Truro; 125 for W. G. Grace's XI at the Crystal Palace, he & Alec Hearne putting on 242 for the third wicket in two hours and forty minutes, & 82 for Somerset at Taunton.

A fine bat on all kinds of pitches, a beautiful field in the slips and a clever leg-break bowler, Braund showed such form directly he appeared in Championship matches for Somerset that in 1901 he scored 1,064 runs for them, with three hundreds and an average of 35, besides taking 78 wickets. His bowling successes included ten Yorkshire wickets at Taunton, eleven Kent wickets at Catford -- five for 23 runs in the first innings -- and seven Gloucestershire wickets for 70 in the second innings at Bristol. In a memorable match at Leeds, 222 of 238 arrears were hit off by L. C. H. Palairet and Braund before a wicket fell and the Somerset total reached 630. Palairet made 173, Braund 107 and F. A. Phillips 122. Then Yorkshire, set to make 393, failed so completely that they were all out for 113, suffering by 279 runs their only Championship defeat of the summer. Sharing the bowling honours with B. Cranfield, Braund took four wickets for 41.

Colin Blythe (1879-1917) Test Cap No:130

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Full name Colin Blythe
Born May 30, 1879, Deptford, Kent
Died November 8, 1917, on the Forest Hall to Pimmern military railway line near Passchendaele, Belgium (aged 38 years 162 days)
Major teams England, Kent
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Slow left-arm orthodox

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A great slow left-armer, possessing a classical delivery and looping flight. His action was elegant and smooth, a few strides leading into a perfect upright sideways-on delivery. He pitched the ball up to encourage the drive into a strong off-side field, and with sufficient spin to trap any batsman unwise enough to try and hit against it. He varied his pace well, and was deceptive through the air, with more pace than most batsmen realised until too late. On the uncovered wickets before World War One, he was almost unplayable after rain, or when the pitch started to crumble. He relished the challenge of bowling to hard-hitting batsman, bringing to his art the virtue of considerable imagination - he seemed always to have something more up his sleeve. He debuted for Kent when 20 years old, and took over 100 wickets in his second season. He bowled little the following year, due to illness, but from 1902 to his final season in 1914 he took more than 10 wickets every year. His best year was 1909, when he took 215 wickets. In 1907 he took more wickets in a day than anyone else in first-class cricket history, following 10 for 30 (including 7 wickets for 1 run in 36 balls) with 7-18 against Northamptonshire. He toured Australia and South Africa twice, and America once, but in general found bowling overseas less to his taste than in English conditions. He was a fine violinist, and his artistic temperament, as well as his epilepsy did not always react well to the stress of Test matches. He died tragically young, killed in action at Passchendaele, and his memorial stands on the St. Lawrence Ground in Canterbury.

Sydney Francis Barnes (1873-1967) Test Cap No:129

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Full name Sydney Francis Barnes
Born April 19, 1873, Smethwick, Staffordshire
Died December 26, 1967, Chadsmoor, Staffordshire (aged 94 years 251 days)
Major teams England, Lancashire, Wales, Warwickshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast-medium, Right-arm medium

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Born at Smethwick, Staffordshire, April 19, 1873. Died at Chadsmoor, Staffordshire, December 26, 1967. Sydney Francis Barnes was the second son of five children of Richard Barnes who spent nearly all his life in Staffordshire and worked for a Birmingham firm for 63 years. The father played only a little cricket and Sydney Barnes averred that he never had more than three hours' coaching, but he practised assiduously to perfect the leg-break after learning the off-break from the Smethwick professional, Billy Ward of Warwickshire.

Most cricketers and students of the game belonging to the period in which S.F. Barnes played were agreed that he was the bowler of the century. Australians as well as English voted him unanimously the greatest. Clem Hill, the famous Australian left-handed batsman, who in successive Test innings scored 99, 98, 97, v. A.C. MacLaren's England team of 1901-02, told me that on a perfect wicket Barnes could swing the new ball in and out "very late", could spin from the ground, pitch on the leg stump and miss the off. At Melbourne, in December 1911, Barnes in five overs overwhelmed Kelleway, Bardsley, Hill and Armstrong for a single.Hill was clean bowled by him. "The ball pitched outside my leg-stump, safe to the push off my pads, I thought. Before I could `pick up' my bat, my off-stump was knocked silly."

Barnes was creative, one of the first bowlers really to use the seam of a new ball and combine swing so subtly with spin that few batsmen could distinguish one from the other.He made a name before a new ball was available to an attack every so many runs or overs. He entered first-class cricket at a time when one ball had to suffice for the whole duration of the batting side's innings.He was professional in the Lancashire League when A.C. MacLaren, hearing of his skill, invited him to the nets at Old Trafford. "He thumped me on the left thigh. He hit my gloves from a length. He actually said, `Sorry, sir!' and I said, `Don't be sorry, Barnes. You're coming to Australia with me.'"

Arthur Owen Jones (1872-1914) Test Cap No:128

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Full name Arthur Owen Jones
Born August 16, 1872, Shelton, Nottinghamshire
Died December 21, 1914, Lanark House, Dunstable, Bedfordshire (aged 42 years 127 days)
Major teams England, Cambridge University, London County, Nottinghamshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak

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Arthur Owen Jones died on December 21, at his brother's house at Dunstable. He played in a few matches for Notts at the beginning of the past season, but his condition was very bad, and his friends knew he would not be able to go on for long. During the summer he spent some time at a sanatorium in the New Forest, but nothing could be done for him, consumption being too far advanced. He went home, given up as incurable, and the end came as a release from his sufferings. Born on August 16, 1872, Mr. Jones played his first match for Notts against Lancashire at Trent Bridge in 1892. Helping Notts to a victory by six wickets, he at once gave proof of his brilliant qualities as a cricketer. The match was a remarkable one. Notts--a great side that season--had 222 to get to win. As he had made 17 not out in the first innings, Jones was selected to go in with Shrewsbury, and between them the two batsmen scored 75 for the first wicket, putting their side on the high road to victory. They might have done more, but a brilliant run out ended the partnership. Jones was then up at Cambridge, but he only played once against Oxford at Lord's, being on the winning side in 1893.

Walter Morris Bradley (1875-1944) Test Cap No:127

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Full name Walter Morris Bradley
Born January 2, 1875, Sydenham, London
Died June 19, 1944, Wandsworth Common, London (aged 69 years 169 days)
Major teams England, Kent, London County
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast

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Bradley, Mr. Walter Morris, died at his home at Wandsworth Common on June 20, aged 69. After captaining the Alleyn's School XI and doing remarkable things for Lloyd's Register--six wickets with consecutive balls at Mitcham was one effort--he was tried for Kent and became a protégé of Lord Harris, so that he found time to play county cricket with some regularity from 1895 to 1903. No one who often watched Bill Bradley will forget his aggressive long run with both arms flung above his thrown-back head prior to the right-hand delivery from the full reach of his six feet height. Pitching at the stumps and seldom short, Bradley really personified the attack in cricket, and rarely did he fail to cause trouble among the opposition. A very hard worker, he would keep going for long spells without slackening his speed. As testimony to his worth it need only be mentioned that he played twice for England against Australia in 1899.

In the Manchester match with Joe Darling's very powerful team his great efforts in the first innings earned five wickets for 67 and a place at the Oval in one of the best sides that ever took the field: F. S. Jackson, Hayward, K. S. Ranjitsinhji, C. B. Fry, A. C. MacLaren (captain), C. L. Townsend, Lockwood, A. O. Jones, Lilley, W. Rhodes and W. M. Bradley.By far the best amateur bowler that year, his record showed 156 wickets at 19.10 each, but after his heavy work at Old Trafford he met with no success in the Oval Test. That year at Trent Bridge his analysis showed 12 Nottinghamshire wickets for 83 runs, and at Old Trafford in 1901 he took 14 Lancashire wickets for 134, while 12 Surrey wickets fell to him at Canterbury for 142 runs. Twice in 1899 he did the hat-trick--against Essex at Leyton and Yorkshire at Tonbridge. Altogether in his nine seasons of first-class cricket Bradley took 624 wickets at 22.64 each and made 77 catches.

Harding Isaac Young (1876-1964) Test Cap No:126

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Full name Harding Isaac Young
Born February 5, 1876, Leyton, Essex
Died December 12, 1964, Rochford, Essex (aged 88 years 311 days)
Major teams England, Essex
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Left-arm medium
Other Umpire

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Harding Issac 'Sailor' Young, who died in hospital on December 12, 1964, aged 88, played as a professional all-rounder for Essex from 1898 to 1912. His death escaped general notice at the time. Born at Leyton, he achieved prominence in minor cricket while serving in the Royal Navy and the excellence of his bowling in the nets at Leyton attracted the attention of Mr. C.E. Green.So much so, indeed, that Mr. Green bought Young out of the Service to play for Essex. From this originated the nick-name Sailor by which he was know in the cricket world.

William George Quaife (1872-1951) Test Cap No:125

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Full name William George Quaife
Born March 17, 1872, Newhaven, Sussex
Died October 13, 1951, Edgbaston, Birmingham, Warwickshire (aged 79 years 210 days)
Major teams England, Griqualand West, London County, Warwickshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak

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William Quaife was a solid yet stylish middle-order batsman who served Warwickshire unstintingly for more than three decades ( he joined them after one season at Sussex) scoring 1000 runs in a season no fewer than 25 times. Sadly, he never reproduced this form for England. He was also a more than capable legspinner - although his action was cause for concern - and an outstanding cover fielder. He was also one of the smallest Test cricketers. His exact height was never confirmed - even his son was unsure - but most contemporaries put it between 5" 2' and 5" 5'. In 1928, aged 56, he made 115 in his final innings for Warwickshire - he had registered exactly the same score on his debut for the county 35 years earlier. In retirement he became a cricket bat manufacturer.

William Quaife, known as "Willie", born at Newhaven, Sussex on 17 March 1872 and died at Edgbaston, Birmingham, on 13 October 1951, was a cricketer who played for Sussex, Warwickshire and England.A diminutive right-handed batsman with a strong defence, Quaife played one match for Sussex before moving, with his older brother Walter, to Warwickshire in 1894. He made a century on his debut and, 35 years later at the age of 56, made another on his last appearance for the county in 1928. In between, he scored more than 36,000 runs with a further 70 centuries and, for good measure, took 900 wickets with leg break bowling that, early in his career, was suspected to be illegal. He passed the 1,000 run mark in 25 seasons and was the leading batsman as Warwickshire won the County Championship for the first time in 1911. His career total of 36,012 runs puts him 36th on the all-time list of run-getters.

Charles Lucas Townsend (1876-1958) Test Cap No: 124

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Full name Charles Lucas Townsend
Born November 7, 1876, Clifton, Bristol
Died October 17, 1958, Elton Manor, Stockton-on-Tees, Co Durham (aged 81 years 344 days)
Major teams England, Gloucestershire, London County
Batting style Left-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak

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Charles Lucas Townsend, who died at his home at Stockton-on-Tees on October 17, aged 81, was a right-arm slow bowler and left-handed batsman for Gloucestershire between 1893 and 1909. It is not too much to say that towards the close of the 1895 season, when a youth of 18, he was the most remarkable amateur bowler since A. G. Steel carried all before him in 1878. Such was the amount of spin that Townsend imparted to the ball that even the most experienced of batsmen found themselves in difficulties with his leg-breaks. In Gloucestershire matches with Nottinghamshire in 1895 he took at Trent Bridge 16 wickets for 122 runs and at Cheltenham 13 for 110. Against Yorkshire at Cheltenham he obtained 15 wickets, and against Sussex at Bristol, Surrey at Clifton and Somerset at Taunton 12 wickets fell to him on each occasion. Though he played in only one game until late in July, he dismissed 131 batsmen at a cost of 13 runs each.During the next two years, without quite maintaining his bowling skill, he took 113 wickets in 1896 and 92 in 1897 and materially enhanced his reputation as a batsman. In 1898 he reached the height of his career, for after winning the match with Middlesex at Lord's by his bowling, he played a series of splendid innings. As soon as he left off making hundreds, he bowled almost as finely as in that memorable 1895 season. Altogether that year he hit 1,270 runs, average 34, and took 145 wickets, average 20.

Walter Mead (1868-1954) Test Cap No:123

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Full name Walter Mead
Born April 1, 1868, Clapton, London
Died March 18, 1954, Shelley, Ongar, Essex (aged 85 years 351 days)
Major teams England, Essex, London County
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm offbreak, Legbreak

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Walter Mead was the principal bowler for Essex during their first two decades as a first-class county. As a member of the Lord’s ground staff, he was also after J.T. Hearne the most important bowler for MCC and Ground, who in those days played quite a number of first-class matches.

A right arm bowler of slow to medium pace, Walter Mead always maintained an excellent length and could spin back to deadly effect whenever wickets were affected by rain. He could vary his stock off break with a ball that turned the other way, but he lacked the deceptive flight that enabled such bowlers as Blythe, Dennett or J.C. White to do well on firm pitches. He rarely did much as a batsman, but when sent in as night-watchman against Leicestershire in 1902 he surprised the crowd so much by making 119 there was a special collection for him as reward.

Even before Essex had been elevated to first-class status, Walter Mead already had a reputation as a bowler of class. Against the touring Australian in 1893 he took seventeen wickets, but the following year when Essex became first-class he was disappointing on pitches that should have helped him, taking only 41 wickets in eight inter-county matches for 21 each. In 1895, however, after a slow start, he became deadly when wickets became sticky during the middle of July. For the whole summer Mead obtained a record of 179 wickets for less than fifteen runs apiece, and his 17 for 119 against Hampshire is the second best bowling for a losing side in first-class cricket, behind William Mycroft in 1876 (also against Hampshire). Only Tich Freeman has since taken seventeen wickets twice in matches of comparable importance.

Gilbert Laird Jessop (1874-1955) Test Cap No:122

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Full name Gilbert Laird Jessop
Born May 19, 1874, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire
Died May 11, 1955, Fordington, Dorset (aged 80 years 357 days)
Major teams England, Cambridge University, Gloucestershire, London County
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast
Height 5 ft 7 in

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The "Croucher" (so named for his somewhat odd stance) was one of the most exciting players of his, or any era. A fast bowler good enough to be selected for England purely in this role, a superlative cover fielder, Jessop is best remembered for his thrilling batsmanship. To quote HS Altham "no cricketer that has ever lived hit the ball so often, so fast and with such a bewildering variety of strokes". By no means a big man at 5'7" and 11 stone, he was a powerful driver, fierce cutter and hooker, but could also play delicate late cuts and glances. In his best innings he scored at rates of close to 100 runs/hour. He debuted for his native county, Gloucestershire at the age of 20, and arrived at the wicket to save a hat trick by striking his first delivery in county cricket for 4. His great innings included 286 in less than 3 hours, 157 runs in an hour against the West Indian team of 1900, and famously, the century that won the Oval Test of 1902. Going in with England 48/5 he made 104 out of 139 in 75 minutes, taking England to an improbable victory.