Saturday, February 20

Francis Gilbertson Justice Ford (1866-1940) Test Cap No: 90

© Wisden Cricket Monthly
Full name Francis Gilbertson Justice Ford
Born December 14, 1866, Paddington, London
Died February 7, 1940, Burwash, Sussex (aged 73 years 55 days)
Major teams England, Cambridge University, Middlesex
Batting style Left-hand bat
Bowling style Slow left-arm orthodox

Profile
Francis Ford, the youngest of seven brothers, all good cricketers at Repton, and nephew of G. J. Ford, who played for Oxford at Lord's a hundred years ago, died on February 7, aged 73, at Burwash, Sussex. After four years in the Repton XI, being captain in the last two seasons, Francis Ford was the third of the brothers who played for Cambridge, receiving his Blue as a Freshman. In his first year Oxford won by seven wickets, the next match was drawn, and then he took part in two handsome victories. When captain, he led his side to a great triumph by an innings and 105 runs, and, playing again, he helped Cambridge to win by seven wickets, this being the sixth time in nine consecutive seasons on which that margin settled the trial of strength between the Universities at Lord's.

John Thomas Brown (1869-1904) Test Cap No: 89

© En.wikipedia.org
Full name John Thomas Brown
Born August 20, 1869, Great Driffield, Yorkshire
Died November 4, 1904, Pimlico, Westminster, London (aged 35 years 76 days)
Major teams England, Yorkshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak

Profile
Jack Brown died at Dr. Kingscote"s Medical Home in London, on the night of November 4, of congestion of the brain and heart failure. A statement appeared a few days before his death that there were hopes of his recovery from the heart trouble which in May terminated his cricket career, but other complications set in, and despite all that medical skill could do for him, the Yorkshire batsman passed away. As he was only in his thirty-sixth year he might, under happier circumstances, have gone on playing for a good many seasons to come. Still, during the time he was before the public he did enough to earn a place among the best cricketers Yorkshire has ever produced.

Thomas Richardson (1870-1912) Test Cap No: 88

©Getty image
Full name Thomas Richardson
Born August 11, 1870, Byfleet, Surrey
Died July 2, 1912, St Jean d'Arvey, Chambery, Savoie, France (aged 41 years 326 days)
Major teams England, London County, Somerset, Surrey
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast

Profile
© Surrey County Cricket 
Tom Richardson, whose tragic end caused such a painful shock to his friends, was born at Byfleet, August 11, 1870; died at St Jean d'Arvey, July 2, 1912. He will live in cricket history as perhaps the finest of all fast bowlers. Among the only men who can be placed with him are George Freeman, John Jackson and William Lockwood. Many famous batsmen, among them Ranjitsinhji, contend that on his good days Lockwood was more difficult to play than Richardson, but for consistent excellence there was no comparison between the two bowlers. While he was at his best - from 1893 to 1897 inclusive - Richardson scarcely knew what it was to be out of form. Allowing for the excellence of the wickets on which he had to bowl, it is quite safe to say that his work during those five years has never been surpassed. Too much was exacted from him, but he ought not to have gone off as soon as he did. He began to lose efficiency before he was 28, and though for a year or two longer he did brilliant things he was never again his old self. A great increase in weight rather than hard work was responsible for his comparatively early decline. Looking at the matter in the light of after events, it was no doubt a misfortune that he paid a second visit to Australia. When in the autumn of 1897 he went out with Mr Stoddart's second team, he was at the top of his fame, having just completed a wonderful season's bowling. In English first-class cricket in 1897 he took 273 wickets for less than 14½ runs each. One remembers that when Mr Stoddart's team sailed from Tilbury, Maurice Read was full of forebodings as to the effect the tour might have on Richardson's future, thinking that a winter's rest after his strenuous labours would have been far better for him than Test matches on Australian wickets. After Richardson came home his falling off was plain for all to see. He took 161 wickets in first-class matches in 1898, but his bowling had lost its superlative quality, and only in two or three matches at the end of the season - notably against Warwickshire at The Oval - was he the old Richardson of the previous year. He continued to assist Surrey for several seasons, playing for the county for the last time in 1904. After that he lived for a time at Bath and appeared once at least in the Somerset XI, but he had become bulky in figure, and his day for serious cricket was over.

William Brockwell (1865-1935) Test Cap No: 87

© The Cricketer International
Full name William Brockwell
Born January 21, 1865, Kingston-upon-Thames, Surrey
Died July 1, 1935, Richmond, Surrey (aged 70 years 161 days)
Major teams England, Kimberley, London County, Surrey
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast-medium

Profile
Brockwell, William, a prominent Surrey cricketer nearly fifty years ago, died on July 1. A stylish and often brilliant batsman, strong in back play and a free hitter in front of the wicket, Brockwell also was a useful fast medium paced bowler and a smart fieldsman, notably at second slip where he succeeded George Lohmann--one of the surest catches ever seen in that position. First playing for the county in 1886, Brockwell matured slowly but it was difficult to find a place in the very powerful Surrey eleven of that period. However, from 1891 to 1902 he was a regular member of the side and played his last game in 1903 when the team were declining rapidly in all round strength.

Albert Ward (1865-1939) Test Cap No: 86

Full name Albert Ward
Born November 21, 1865, Waterloo, Leeds, Yorkshire
Died January 6, 1939, Heaton, Bolton, Lancashire (aged 73 years 46 days)
Major teams England, Lancashire, Yorkshire
Batting style Right-hand bat

Profile
© En.wikipedia.org
Albert Ward, a prominent Lancashire and England batsman fifty years ago, died on January 6 at his home in Bolton, aged 73. In 1886 Albert Ward played a few times for Yorkshire, the county of his birth, but, having qualified for Lancashire by residence, he at once proved himself worth a regular place in first-class cricket. Starting in 1889 against M.C.C. at Lord's, he scored 95 for once out and soon afterwards showed his liking for the game at Headquarters by making 114 not out and helping largely towards a victory by an innings and 67 runs over Middlesex.

He finished second in the batting averages with 29 and was always valuable in the side that finished level with Nottinghamshire and Surrey at the top of the Championship. He remained a source of strength to Lancashire batting for fourteen years. He was the first professional who reached a four figure aggregate for Lancashire in a season's county matches and nine times consecutively in first class fixtures he made over a thousand runs a season, his best record being 1,790 runs in 1895 with an average of 42. Altogether for Lancashire he obtained 14,698 runs, average 30.95. These were remarkable figures at that time.Possessing the ideal temperament for an opening batsman--cool, patient, and persevering--he carried his bat through an innings on five occasions and for England against Australia he accomplished some of his best performances.

Edward Wainwright (1865-1919) Test Cap No: 85

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Full name Edward Wainwright
Born April 8, 1865, Tinsley, Sheffield, Yorkshire
Died October 28, 1919, Park, Sheffield, Yorkshire (aged 54 years 203 days)
Major teams England, Yorkshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm slow

Profile
Ted Wainwright, the famous Yorkshire cricketer, after a long illness, passed away at Sheffild on October 28. A very fine batsman, a deadly bowler on a wicket which gave him any assistance, and an excellent field, he had no small share in the many triumphs which attended the Yorkshire team during the fourteen years he was a member of the side. Coming out in the season of 1888, he soon showed that he was a player out of the common by putting together an innings of 105 against the Australians at Bradford. For some seasons afterwards he met with only a moderate share of success as a batsman, but in 1892 he fairly established himself as one of the leading professionals of the day, heading the Yorkshire bowling averages, and running second to Ernest Smith in batting. His great years in run-getting were 1897, when he had an aggregate of 1,612, and 1899, when he totalled 1,541 runs. Altogether, in the course of his career, he played twenty three-figure innings for Yorkshire, his highest being 228 against Surrey, at the Oval, when he and George Hurst put on 340 runs for the seventh wicket.

Arthur Webb Mold (1863-1921) Test Cap No: 84

© The Cricketer International
Full name Arthur Webb Mold
Born May 27, 1863, Middleton Cheney, Northamptonshire
Died April 29, 1921, Middleton Cheney, Northamptonshire (aged 57 years 337 days)
Major teams England, Lancashire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast

Profile
Arthur Mold was one of the most controversial figures of an era when throwing became an increasing problem. Although his action was considered suspect for many years, there was no doubting his speed, and that allied to the movement he got off the pitch, made him the foremast quick bowler of his generation. At the time of his retirement he had taken more wickets than any other fast bowler.He made an immediate impact in his first season (1889) taking 100 wickets at 11.80, and in the next 12 summers he passed a hundred wickets on nine occasions, and two hundred twice (207 in 1894, 213 in 1895).

William Henry Lockwood (1868-1932) Test Cap No: 83

© Surrey County Cricket Club
Full name William Henry Lockwood
Born March 25, 1868, Old Radford, Nottinghamshire
Died April 26, 1932, Old Radford, Nottinghamshire (aged 64 years 32 days)
Major teams England, Nottinghamshire, Surrey
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast

Profile
A difficult, troubled and awkward character, Bill Lockwood struggled with his demons throughout his career, but at his best was a magnificent fast-medium bowler. Unable to gain a place for his native Nottinghamshire, he moved to Surrey, where he learnt much from George Lohmann. By the early 1890s he was one of the finest bowlers in England, bowling at a brisk fast medium, with a high action and pronounced body swing, and clever variation of pace. His specialty was the break-back, often pitching outside off but pounding into the batsman's thigh or passing over leg stump. He also generated speed off the pitch (or appeared to do so), and had a slower ball "of almost sinful deceit". A good bat, with 15 first-class hundreds, he tended to ignore his batting in favour of bowling, but did enough to be classed as a genuine allrounder, averaging 21.9 in first-class cricket.

Frank Stanley Jackson (1870-1947) Test Cap No: 82

©Getty image
Full name Frank Stanley Jackson
Born November 21, 1870, Allerton Hall, Chapel Allerton, Leeds, Yorkshire
Died March 9, 1947, Hyde Park, London (aged 76 years 108 days)
Major teams England, Cambridge University, Yorkshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast-medium

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1915,Stanley Jackson
© The Cricketer International
Sir William Reginald Hall, a leading figure in
British naval intelligence during World War I,
with statesman and cricketer Colonel Frank
Stanley Jackson,November
 1923©Getty image 
The passing of Colonel The Honourable Sir Francis Stanley Jackson, P.C., G.C.I.E., on March 9, in his 77th year, came as a shock, not only to all who knew him personally, but also to every lover of cricket who had watched and enjoyed his wonderful prowess on the field of play. From the time that F. S. Jackson at Lord's by his remarkable allround success helped Harrow gain a victory over Eton by 156 runs in 1888, he went on from strength to strength, until he became one of the finest cricketers ever seen in England. Unfortunately he could not go on any tour to Australia owing to business reasons, and the presence of Lord Hawke in command of Yorkshire until 1910 prevented him from ever being the county captain, though

Hylton Philipson (1866-1935) Test Cap No: 81

© En.wikipedia.org
Full name Hylton Philipson
Born June 8, 1866, Tynemouth, Northumberland
Died December 4, 1935, Hyde Park, London (aged 69 years 179 days)
Major teams England, Middlesex, Oxford University
Batting style Right-hand bat
Fielding position Wicketkeeper

Profile
Punch Philipson, died in London after a long illness, on December 4, in his 70th year. Born on June 8, 1866, at Tynemouth, he went to Eton and gaining a place in the eleven as a batsman in 1883, he subsequently kept wicket besides going in first. In his third year he scored 141 against Winchester; 53 and 27 against Harrow. Illness prevented Philipson from playing cricket in 1886, but next year he got his blue at Oxford, and in 1889 he captained the eleven instead of W. W. Rashleigh, who was studying for the Church. He played his highest innings of 150 in 1887 for Oxford against Middlesex, taking part in a seventh wicket stand of 340 with K. J. Key,

Arthur Dick Pougher (1865-1926) Test Cap No: 80

© En.wikipedia.org
Full name Arthur Dick Pougher
Born April 19, 1865, Humberstone, Leicester
Died May 20, 1926, Aylestone Park, Leicester (aged 61 years 31 days)
Major teams England, Leicestershire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast-medium

Profile
© En.wikipedia.org
Arthur Dick Pougher, born at Leicester, on April 19, 1865, died at his native place on May 20, aged 61. An excellent all-round cricketer, he will be recalled chiefly as a capital medium-pace bowler with a high delivery and a break-back, combined with skilful variation of pace. His most memorable feat was in taking five wickets without a run in fifteen balls for M.C.C. against the Australians at Lord's in June, 1896, the latter being dismissed for 18: one man was absent ill, and the last six wickets went down with the total unchanged. Among manyIn games of less note he took eleven wickets for 18 runs for R. G. Barlow's XI v. XXII of Blackpool and District in 1889, and (in conjunction with F. Martin, of Kent) obtained eight wickets in nine balls for Mr. W. W. Read's Team v. XXII of the Country Clubs at Cape Town in 1891-2, each player taking four in succession. In a twelve-a-side match, too, at Streatham in July, 1892, whilst playing for M.C.C. v. Streatham he took all eleven wickets for 37 runs.

For Leicestershire he made many good scores, including 109 v. Essex at Leyton in 1894, 102 not out v. Warwickshire at Leicester and 114 v. Derbyshire at Derby in 1896, and 104 v. Surrey and 106 v. Yorkshire both at Leicester, in 1899. From 1887 until 1909 he was a member of the M.C.C. ground-staff at Lord's, and he took part in two tours overseas, visiting Australia with Shrewsbury's Team in 1887-8 and South Africa with Mr. W. W. Read's in 1891-2. His only appearance for the Players was at the Oval in 1895. He received reward for his service to the game in two benefit matches-- Leicestershire v. Yorkshire at Leicester in 1900 and Middlesex v. Kent at Lord's in 1910. For many years he had kept the Old Cricket Ground Hotel, Aylestone Park, Leicester.

Only Test South Africa v England at Cape Town, Mar 19-22, 1892
First-class span 1886-1901

John Thomas Hearne (1867-1944) Test Cap No: 78

© Wisden Cricket Monthly
Full name John Thomas Hearne
Born May 3, 1867, Chalfont St Giles, Buckinghamshire
Died April 17, 1944, Chalfont St Giles, Buckinghamshire (aged 76 years 350 days)
Major teams England, Middlesex
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium
Other Coach

Profile
© Wisden Cricket Monthly
© Wisden Cricket Monthly
Only three bowlers (Rhodes, Freeman and Parker) have ever taken more first-class wickets than Middlesex and England's JT "Old Jack" Hearne. A fast-medium bowler with a textbook action, he took 3061 wickets in all, using guile and varied pace to lure batsmen into his trap. Three of his victims gave him England's first hat-trick against Australia, at Headingley in 1899, and it was a seriously illustrious trio: Clem Hill, Syd Gregory and Monty Noble. Three of his cousins and two of his brothers played for Kent, while Young Jack Hearne - who was said to be a distant cousin - also played for England. He was handy lower-order batsman, a useful slip, and a respected coach - he spent his retirement with Oxford University in the summers and, for six years, with the Maharaja of Patiala in India in the winters.

George Gibbons Hearne (1856-1932) Test Cap No:77

© Wisden Cricket Monthly
Full name George Gibbons Hearne
Born July 7, 1856, Ealing, Middlesex
Died February 13, 1932, Denmark Hill, London (aged 75 years 221 days)
Major teams England, Kent
Batting style Left-hand bat

Profile
George Hearne, the eldest of three brothers--Frank and Alec were the others -- all of whom played with much distinction for Kent, was born at Ealing on July 7, 1856, and derived his qualification for Kent through his father having charge of the Private Banks Ground at Catford Bridge.

George Hearne's chance of appearing in the county ranks was, no doubt, materially increased by the fact that in 1875--the first year of Lord Harris's captaincy -- all Kent's home matches with other counties were contested at Catford Bridge. Playing first for Kent in that summer of 1875 when less than nineteen years of age, George Hearne kept his place in the eleven for twenty-one seasons. Primarily a bowler, left-hand round arm, fast medium in pace, he afterwards developed into a capable left-handed batsman. He used to get on a decided natural break and off his bowling manly catches were given in the slips where C. A. Absolom seldom missed a chance. He always batted in correct style and, improving as he increased in strength, played many fine innings, some of which, as Lord Harris wrote, would have been larger but for his captain running him out so often. Smart if not brilliant in the field, George Hearne, as a rule, stood point or mid wicket. Following upon his first season for Kent, he was engaged at Prince's and in 1877 began a connection with the M. C. C. which continued for nearly half a century.

Alec Hearne (1863-1952) Test Cap No:76

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Full name Alec Hearne
Born July 22, 1863, Ealing, Middlesex
Died May 16, 1952, Beckenham, Kent (aged 88 years 299 days)
Major teams England, Kent
Batting style Right-hand bat

Profile
HEARNE, ALEC, who died at Beckenham on May 16, aged 88, was one of the best cricketers who never played for England. A younger brother of George and Frank, both Kent cricketers, he was born at Ealing on July 22, 1863. He derived his qualification for Kent from the fact that his father, old George Hearne, held the post of groundsman at Catford Bridge, where, in 1875, Kent decided all their home county matches. When first tried for the county in 1884, Alec Hearne was no batsman, but a clever leg-break bowler slightly above normal pace, with a good command of length, deceptive flight and plenty of spin. More than once in his early years he proved a thorn in the side of Yorkshire, enjoying a particular triumph at Bramall Lane in 1885 when taking 13 wickets, including five for 13 in one innings, at a cost of 48 runs. The strain upon his elbow entailed in imparting a leg-break troubled him so much that after a few seasons he took to bowling off-breaks, which he did with considerable success. Still, his great ambition was to become a good batsman, and by 1889 he established himself as the skilful run-getter that he remained for nearly twenty years.

William Chatterton (1861-1913) Test Cap No:74

© En.wikipedia.org
Full name William Chatterton
Born December 27, 1861, Thornsett, Derbyshire
Died March 19, 1913, Flowery Field, Hyde, Cheshire (aged 51 years 82 days)
Major teams England, Derbyshire
Batting style Right-hand bat

Profile
William Chatterton, one of the greatest of Derbyshire cricketers, died of consumption at Flowery Field, Hyde, on March 19th, in his 50th year. For many years he occupied a high position among professional batsmen, and it was due largely to him that his county was reinstated among the first-class sides in 1894. Although he had many strokes, his batting was essentially watchful and steady. That his careful methods paid is proved by the fact that for Derbyshire alone his scored 11,619 runs with an average of 25.15. In addition, he took 199 wickets for the county at a cost of just under 23 runs each. For the M.C.C. also his all-round cricket was often most valuable, and for Mr. W. W. Read"s team in South Africa in 1891-2-his only colonial tour-he was by far the biggest run-getter. His chief scores in important cricket were as follows:-
113  Derbyshire v. Essex, at Leyton, 1886.
168  Derbyshire v. Essex, at Leyton, 1889.
106  Derbyshire v. Yorkshire, at Derby, 1891.
101* Derbyshire v. Yorkshire, at Derby, 1893.
127  Derbyshire v. Leicestershire, at Derby, 1895.
111  Derbyshire v. Essex, at Leyton, 1896.
104  Derbyshire v. Lancashire, at Manchester, 1896.
120  Derbyshire v. Essex, at Leyton, 1897.
142  Derbyshire v. Hampshire, at Derby, 1898.
169  Derbyshire v. Gloucestershire, at Bristol, 1901.
109* M.C.C. v. Lancashire, at Lord"s, 1892.
113  M.C.C. v. Cambridge University, at Cambridge, 1894.

In Derbyshire"s match with Essex at Leyton in 1896 he scored 111 and 85 not out, probably only the closure of the innings preventing him from obtaining two separate hundreds. Between 1889 and 1898 he appeared in eight matches for the Players against the Gentlemen, and, with 58 at Hastings in 1891 as his highest score, made 248 runs with an average of 20.66.

Only Test South Africa v England at Cape Town, Mar 19-22, 1892 
First-class span 1882-1902

Victor Alexander Barton (1867-1906) Test Cap No:73

© Wisden
Full name Victor Alexander Barton
Born October 6, 1867, Hound, Netley, Hampshire
Died March 23, 1906, Belle Vue, Southampton, Hampshire (aged 38 years 168 days)
Major teams England, Hampshire, Kent
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium

Profile
An attacking middle order batsman whose career was curtailed by ill-health - he was only 39 when he died - Victor Barton played in just a single Test. An Army man, he first played for Kent, producing a vital innings in the thrilling Kent victory over Nottinghamshire that produced a three-way Kent-Nottinghamshire-Lancashire tie for the Championship in 1889. But Barton failed to establish himself in the Kent side, and then like so many military men, played for Hampshire for a further 11 years. A powerful driver, he hit the ball so hard on the on-side that Wisden's obituary relates that "fieldsmen who stood at mid-on had a wholesome dread of him". Barton played his one Test in 1892, a season in which England had two simultaneous touring teams, the other side being in Australia. He was also a useful bowler, taking 141 first-class wickets.

Only Test South Africa v England at Cape Town, Mar 19-22, 1892
First-class span 1889-1902

George Bean (1864-1923) Test Cap No:72

© En.wikipedia.org
Full name George Bean
Born March 7, 1864, Sutton-in-Ashfield, Nottinghamshire
Died March 16, 1923, Mansfield, Nottinghamshire (aged 59 years 9 days)
Major teams England, Nottinghamshire, Sussex
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium

Profile
George Bean, died at Warsop of pneumonia on March 16. He was one of the many Notts cricketers who earned fame for a county other than that of his birth. His connection with the Notts XI was restricted to the season of 1885. He did not do much, and, declining the offer of half a dozen matches in the following year, he threw in his lot with Sussex for which county he had already qualified by residence. For Sussex he proved himself a most valuable batsman. Between 1886 and 1898 he took part in 219 Sussex matches and hit up ten hundreds.

John William Sharpe (1866-1936) Test Cap No:71

© Surrey County Cricket Club
Full name John William Sharpe
Born December 9, 1866, Ruddington, Nottinghamshire
Died June 19, 1936, Ruddington, Nottinghamshire (aged 69 years 193 days)
Major teams England, Nottinghamshire, Surrey
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast-medium

Profile
John William Sharpe, the old Surrey and Nottinghamshire fast-medium right-hand bowler, died on June 19 at Ruddington, aged 69. His father, Samuel Sharpe, played for Nottinghamshire and John Sharpe received trials for the Colts against the county at Trent Bridge. On one occasion, he took four wickets for five runs, but there was not room for him in the very powerful Nottinghamshire eleven of those days and so Sharpe qualified at Kennington Oval. Playing for Surrey from 1889 to 1893, he took 462 wickets at 13.81, runs each in all matches for the county.

Frederick Martin (1861-1921) Test Cap No:70

© ESPNcricinfo Ltd
Full name Frederick Martin
Born October 12, 1861, Dartford, Kent
Died December 13, 1921, Dartford, Kent (aged 60 years 62 days)
Major teams England, Kent
Batting style Left-hand bat
Bowling style Left-arm medium

Profile
Frederick Martin (12 October 1861, Dartford, Kent, England – 13 December 1921, Dartford, Kent, England) was a Kent left-arm spinner who was that county's leading bowler in the early years of the County Championship. Quicker than most bowlers of his type, and without the subtle flight of Johnny Briggs or Bobby Peel's variation of pace, Martin relied more than anything on his amazing accuracy of length. At his peak in the early 1890s, Martin had as much spin as any of his rivals in county cricket, but, from 1892, he lost much of it and was generally only dangerous when the pitches gave him a good deal of assistance – something which became less and less frequent as, in dry weather, they improved rapidly through the 1890s. In his early days, Martin was a very poor batsman, but, by the end of his career, he had developed into a handy lower-order player, especially in an emergency. He hit one score of ninety against Nottinghamshire in 1897.

James Cranston (1859-1904) Test Cap No: 69

©  cliftonrfchistory.co.uk
Full name James Cranston
Born January 9, 1859, Bordesley, Birmingham, Warwickshire
Died December 10, 1904, Bristol (aged 45 years 336 days)
Major teams England, Gloucestershire
Batting style Left-hand bat
Bowling style Left-arm bowler

Profile
There have been many one-Test wonders in the history of English cricket, and it would be pardonable to assume that James Cranston was discarded after his one appearance based on an unimpressive top score of 16. In fact, Cranston played a vital role in England winning the 1890 Test series against Australia. Brought into the team at the last minute for the final Test at The Oval, he played two important innings in a low-scoring match. Wisden said that "his defence under very trying conditions against the bowling of Turner and Ferris was masterly".

Gregor MacGregor (1869-1919) Test Cap No: 68

© ESPNcricinfo Ltd
Full name Gregor MacGregor
Born August 31, 1869, Merchiston, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland
Died August 20, 1919, Marylebone, London (aged 49 years 354 days)
Major teams England, Scotland, Cambridge University, Middlesex
Batting style Right-hand bat
Fielding position Wicketkeeper

Profile
Gregor MacGregor, It was a shock to all lovers of cricket to learn on August 20 that Mr. Gregor MacGregor was dead. Still in early middle-age, he would had he lived another week have completed his 50th year. To be quite exact, he was born in Edinburgh on August 31, 1869. He was a prominent figure in first-class cricket of roughly speaking, twenty seasons, playing his last matches for Middlesex in 1907. Fame came to him before he was 20. After two years in the Uppingham team he went up to Cambridge, and as soon as he was seen at the University ground in the spring of 1888 it was realized that a wicket-keeper of extraordinary ability had been found. He gained his Blue at once, and during his four years at Cambridge he was one of the stars of the eleven. Alfred Lyttelton had left behind him the reputation of being the best wicket-keeper Cambridge had ever possessed, but even his warmest admirers--among them A. G. Steel--were forced to admit that MacGregor surpassed him, his superiority lying chiefly in the fact that he took the ball much closer to the wicket, and was in consequence the quicker stumper. In catching there was little to chose between the two men.

Joseph Emile Patrick McMaster(1861-1929) Test Cap No:67

Full name Joseph Emile Patrick McMaster
Born March 16, 1861, Gilford, Co Down, Ireland
Died June 7, 1929, Bloomsbury, London (aged 68 years 83 days)
Major teams England
Batting style Right-hand bat
Relation Son - M McMaster

Profile
Joseph Emile Patrick McMaster (16 March 1861 in County Down, Ireland – 7 June 1929 in London) is notable as having probably the oddest and shortest first-class cricket career of all-time. He was selected for an under-strength England team that toured South Africa in 1888/9 and was selected as a bowler in the second and final Test match, in Cape Town, starting on 25 March 1889. England batted first scoring 292, with McMaster making a first ball duck. He was not required to bowl in South Africa's two innings of 47 and 43, with Johnny Briggs taking 15 for 28 with the match ending in the second day. He never played another first-class game.Cricinfo refers to McMaster as Joseph, whereas CricketArchive refers to McMaster as Emile.

Only Test South Africa v England at Cape Town, Mar 25-26, 1889
First-class span 1888-1889

Charles Aubrey Smith (1863-1948) Test Cap No: 66

© Getty Images
Full name Charles Aubrey Smith
Born July 21, 1863, City of London
Died December 20, 1948, Beverly Hills, California, United States of America (aged 85 years 152 days)
Major teams England, Cambridge University, Sussex, Transvaal
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast

Profile
1938-Gubby Allen and Sir Charles,
Aubrey smith.........
©The Cricketer International
Sir Aubrey Smith chats with James Langridge,
© The Cricketer International
The chance to read one's own obituary is rare. Neville Cardus, on being told that the Buckinghamshire Examiner had described his death and published a moving tribute, paused before saying: "I have no wish to challenge the authority of the provincial press. They must have some information."Sir Aubrey Smith, the greatest actor-cricketer in the game's history, read of his own demise 59 years before the event. In October 1889 the Graff-Reinet Advertiser announced that he had "succumbed to that fell disease, inflammation of the lungs". "Much regret will be felt at his decease," the article continued. "He made many friends by his kindly disposition." When Smith eventually died of pneumonia, in Beverly Hills, California, at the age of 85, he had left a far more imposing legacy. He was, after all, the only captain of England to star in a film with Elizabeth Taylor (Mervyn Le Roy's Little Women).

Frank Hearne (1858-1949) Test Cap No: 65

© Getty image
Full name Frank Hearne
Born November 23, 1858, Ealing, Middlesex, England
Died July 14, 1949, Mowbray, Cape Town, Cape Province (aged 90 years 233 days)
Major teams England, South Africa, Kent, Western Province
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast (roundarm)
Other Umpire
Height 5 ft 5 in

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a group photo of  a fomous cricketing family,
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A famous cricketing family, Frank Hearne was a solid batsman with a strong defence and a range of attacking shots, favouring the off-side. He also occasionally bowled fast round-arm. A Kent regular, in 1888-89 he toured South Africa with Major Warton's side and stayed on at the end of the trip on health grounds, setting up a sports outfitters in Cape Town. He was soon invited to play for Western Province, and in an era when qualification for a new territory such as South Africa was extremely relaxed, within two years he was making his debut against his two brothers, who were both making their own debuts for England. He toured England in 1894, and to add to the mixed family loyalties, his son, George Hearne, played for South Africa as well.

Test debut South Africa v England at Cape Town, Apr 1-4, 1899
Last Test South Africa v England at Cape Town, Mar 30-Apr 2, 1906

Basil Arthur Firebrace Grieve (1864-1917) Test Cap No: 64

Full name Basil Arthur Firebrace Grieve
Born May 28, 1864, Kilburn, Middlesex
Died November 19, 1917, Eastbourne, Sussex (aged 53 years 175 days)
Major teams England
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium-fast

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Basil Grieve's two Test appearances - both made during Major Warton's tour in 1888-89 - make up his entire first-class career. He was not a slouch, and had been a medium-paced opening bowler for Harrow and MCC. A wine merchant by trade, he died in 1917 of natural causes. Such was his impact on the cricket world, Wisden carried a three-line obituary which failed to mention his appearances for England.

Test debut South Africa v England at Port Elizabeth, Mar 12-13, 1889
Last Test South Africa v England at Cape Town, Mar 25-26, 1889
First-class span 1888-1889

Arnold James Fothergill (1854-1932) Test Cap No: 63

Full name Arnold James Fothergill
Born August 26, 1854, Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland
Died August 1, 1932, Sunderland, Co Durham (aged 77 years 341 days)
Major teams England, Somerset
Batting style Left-hand bat
Bowling style Left-arm medium-fast

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Arnold Fothergill played twice for England in South Africa in 1888-89 in the games that were later designated as the first Tests between the two countries, though they were arguably not even first-class. Born in Northumberland, he was a left-arm fast bowler who migrated to the emerging Somerset club, which engaged Fothergill and Alfred Brooks of Nottinghamshire as its first professionals. Technically,

Charles John Coventry (1867-1929)Test Cap No: 62

Full name Charles John Coventry
Born February 26, 1867, Marylebone, London
Died June 2, 1929, Earl's Croome, Worcestershire (aged 62 years 96 days)
Major teams England
Batting style Right-hand bat
Education Eton College

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Colonel Charles John Coventry, CB (26 February 1867 in Marylebone, London, England–2 June 1929, Earls Croome, Worcestershire, England) played cricket for England in the first two Test matches they played against South Africa. The second son of the Earl of Coventry, Charles Coventry played his cricket for Worcestershire, at the time a Minor County, and in 1888-89 was invited to tour South Africa with Major Warton's side. Two of the games were considered Tests. In the first, Coventry, who was making his first-class debut, batted at No.10 and made 12; in the second, he again batted at No.10 and scored 1*. He returned to South Africa in 1896 and took part in the Jameson Raid where he was wrongly reported as having been killed. Arrangements were made for a memorial service back in England but news arrived that he was alive as the service was about to start and it instead became a celebration. He was sentenced to five months in prison for his part in the raid but was released after 24 days due to ill health. A career army man, he saw service in the 1893 Matabeleland campaign and in the Great War took part in the Dardanelles campaign and was later captured in Palestine. For many years he was official starter to the Jockey Club.

Test debut South Africa v England at Port Elizabeth, Mar 12-13, 1889
Last Test South Africa v England at Cape Town, Mar 25-26, 1889
First-class span 1888-1889

Montague Parker Bowden (1865-1892) Test Cap No: 61

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Full name Montague Parker Bowden
Born November 1, 1865, Stockwell, Surrey
Died February 19, 1892, Umtali (now Mutare), Mashonaland, Rhodesia (aged 26 years 110 days)
Major teams England, Surrey, Transvaal
Batting style Right-hand bat
Fielding position Wicketkeeper

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Monty Bowden was England's youngest ever Test captain at 23 years 144 days when he took over from C. Aubrey-Smith for the Second Test of England's first ever tour of South Africa in 1888-89. At the time these matches had little importance attached to them - so little in fact that his captaincy was not mentioned in his brief obituary in Wisden. He debuted for Surrey in 1883, and showed great initial promise that was never fully realised. A useful right-handed bat and wicketkeeper, his best season was in 1888, when he averaged over 30, and played for the Gentlemen against the Players at Lord's and The Oval, and for the Gentlemen against Australia at Lord's.

Henry Wood (1853-1919) Test Cap No: 60

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Full name Henry Wood
Born December 14, 1853, Dartford, Kent
Died April 30, 1919, Waddon, Surrey (aged 65 years 137 days)
Major teams England, Kent, Surrey
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast (roundarm)
Fielding position Wicketkeeper

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Henry Wood, the Surrey wicket-keeper, belongs by birth to the county of Kent, having, been born at Dartford on December 14, 1855, the same year in which both Blackham and Pilling came into the world. While quite a boy Wood earned distinction as a cricketer, playing for Dartford School when only eleven years of age, and afterwards figuring with success in many local matches. It was as a member of the Kent eleven that he was introduced to public cricket, representing his native county against Hampshire at Southampton in June, 1876. In a somewhat intermittent fashion he kept up his connection with Kent cricket, appearing in 1878, and twice in 1881, but being absent from all the county's engagements in 1879 and 1880.

Frank Howe Sugg (1862-1933) Test Cap No:59

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Full name Frank Howe Sugg
Born January 11, 1862, Ilkeston, Derbyshire
Died May 29, 1933, Waterloo, Liverpool, Lancashire (aged 71 years 138 days)
Major teams England, Derbyshire, Lancashire, Yorkshire
Batting style Right-hand bat

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Frank Howe Sugg, who died on May 29, was born at Ilkeston on January 11, 1862. A fine enterprising batsman, especially strong in driving and square-leg hitting, and a brilliant outfield, who not only covered a lot of ground but possessed a very safe pair of hands, he had the experience--very unusual in modern days--of playing for three different counties. He appeared for Yorkshire in 1883, for Derbyshire--his native county--in 1884, 1885 and 1886, and for thirteen seasons subsequently, having qualified by residence, he assisted Lancashire. While doing

little as a member of the Yorkshire team, he rendered capital service to Derbyshire, running second in the averages one year to L. C. Docker, and in another to W. Chatterton, while amongst his scores was one of 187 against Hampshire at Southampton. His great work, however, was accomplished for Lancashire. Standing six feet high, he possessed very quick sight and, if his methods tended to make him a poor starter, no one was more likely on a bad wicket to turn the fortunes of a game. Altogether for Lancashire he scored 10,375 runs with an average of 26.

He played in 1896 an innings of 220 against Gloucestershire and on five other occasions exceeded 150, his hundreds in first-class cricket numbering sixteen in all. In the game with Somerset at Taunton in 1899, he and G. R. Baker hit up 50 runs off three consecutive overs, Sugg, in one of these, registering five 4's. Sugg appeared several times for the Players against the Gentlemen and in 1888 took part in Test Matches against Australia at the Oval and at Manchester.

John Shuter (1855-1920) Test Cap No:58

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Full name John Shuter
Born February 9, 1855, Thornton Heath, Surrey
Died July 5, 1920, Blackheath, London (aged 65 years 147 days)
Major teams England, Kent, Surrey
Batting style Right-hand bat

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The sudden death on July 5th at his home at Blackheath, of John Shuter came as a shock to the general body of cricketers. On the previous Friday he was at the Oval and to all appearances in good health. His intimate friends knew, however, that the attack of hemorrhage that killed him was not the first of the kind from which he had suffered. It was in September 1919, when Mr. Findlay went to Lord's, that he took up the post of secretary to the Surrey Club.
He was, perhaps, a little too old for such an onerous position, but everyone hoped he had several years of work before him. Any way it was only fitting that he should to the end have been closely associated with Surrey cricket. His name will be remembered as long as the Surrey Club exists, as it was under his leadership that Surrey won back the first place among the counties in 1887, and enjoyed for the next five seasons a period of unexampled success. John Shuter belonged to Surrey by birth--he was born at Thornton Heath on February 9, 1855--but living at Bexley he was in his young days connected with club cricket in Kent. He was in the Winchester eleven in 1871, 1872, and 1873 being captain and the best bat in the team in his last year. In 1873 he played a fine innings of 52 but it was only in 1871 that he had the good fortune to be on the winning side. It was in that year and 1870 that G. S. Raynor--anticipating modern bowlers--demoralised the Eton batsmen by his bewildering swerve. After leaving Winchester John Shuter played in a county match for Kent--against Lancashire at Maidstone--in 1874, and in the following year he played for the County eleven against the Kent Coldts at Catford Bridge. However, his potential value as a batsman was not realised, and after a time he threw in his lot with Surrey, playing in three matches for his native county in 1877. No success rewarded him that year, but in 1878 he took a very decided step to the front, and left no doubt as to his class.

Robert Abel (1857-1936) Test Cap No:57

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Full name Robert Abel
Born November 30, 1857, Rotherhithe, Surrey
Died December 10, 1936, Stockwell, London (aged 79 years 10 days)
Major teams England, Surrey
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm offbreak
Relation Son - WJ Abel, Son - TE Abel

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Robert Abel the old Surrey and England cricketer, died at his home near Kennington Oval on December 10, in his eightieth year. A great favourite at the Oval, Bobby Abel, popularly known as The Guv'nor, began his career with Surrey in 1881, and played his last match for the county in 1904, failing eyesight causing him to drop out of the eleven earlier than otherwise he need have done. Born on November 30, 1857, he was 23 when first appearing for his county. Found in club cricket in Southwark Park, he took some time to accustom himself to new surroundings and his early efforts in first-class cricket gave no idea of the skill which he steadily attained. Very keen, he overcame the handicap of being short and, while maturing his form with the bat, he attracted attention by smart fielding, especially at slip.

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In his third season with Surrey he advanced rapidly as a batsman and in 1886 against the Australians at the Oval he played a remarkable innings of 144. In 1888--one of the wettest summers ever experienced--he came out first among the professional batsmen of the year, scoring in first-class matches 1,323 runs with an average of 31. Thenceforward his successful career was interrupted only in 1893 when a serious infection of the eyes interfered with his play. If late in reaching his best, he was right at the top of the tree from 1895 to 1902, scoring over 2,000 runs in first-class matches in eight successive seasons. His highest aggregate of runs, 3,309, was obtained in 1901 and his average in these eight years of conspicuous ability ranged from 56 to 41. In 1903 his eyes troubled him again, and though playing in glasses helped him to some extent next year his first-class career then closed.

Andrew Ernest Stoddart (1863-1915) Test Cap No:56

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Full name Andrew Ernest Stoddart
Born March 11, 1863, Westoe, South Shields, Co Durham
Died April 4, 1915, St John's Wood, London (aged 52 years 24 days)
Major teams England, Middlesex
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium

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Andrew Stoddart was a late starter - he didn't take up cricket seriously until he was 22 - but immediately made an impression for Hampstead and Middlesex. In 1886 he scored a world record 485 in 370 minutes for Hampstead against Stoics, all after spending the entire night before the game playing poker. But even then the indefatigable Soddart wasn't tired - he spent the rest of the afternoon playing tennis and finished off with a dinner party in the evening. That summed up the man. An excellent rugby three-quarter - he played 10 times for England - his energy was boundless. An aggressive opening batsman, right-arm medium-pace change bowler, and outstanding fielder, he seemed to epitomise the late amateur Victorian sporting ethos. He led England on two of his four tours of Australia, and was the first England captain to insert Australia and the first to declare a Test innings closed. But as he aged his health deteriorated, and faced with his declining powers and burdened by financial worries, he shot himself three weeks after his 52nd birthday.