Monday, December 7

Glen Gordon Hall (1938-1987) Test Cap No:223

Full name Glen Gordon Hall
Born May 24, 1938, Pretoria, Transvaal
Died June 26, 1987, Ramsgate, Natal (aged 49 years 33 days)
Major teams South Africa, Eastern Province, North Eastern Transvaal
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak

Profile
Glen Gordon Hall (24 May 1938, Pretoria, Transvaal – 26 June 1987, Ramsgate, KwaZulu-Natal) was a South African cricketer who played in one Test in 1965.A "tall leg-spinner, quickish with both googly and top-spinner in his repertoire",Glen Hall had a remarkable start to his first-class career. Playing for South African Universities against Western Province in 1960-61, he took 4 for 24 and 9 for 122.

Clive Grey Halse (1935-2002) Test Cap No:221

© en.wikipedia.org
Full name Clive Grey Halse
Born February 28, 1935, Empangeni, Natal (Zululand)
Died May 28, 2002, Sherwood, Durban, KwaZulu-Natal (aged 67 years 89 days)
Major teams South Africa, Natal
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast

Profile
Clive Gray Halse (28 February 1935 in Empangeni, KwaZulu-Natal – 28 May 2002 in Durban, KwaZulu-Natal) was a South African cricketer who played in three Tests in 1964.Halse was a right-arm fast bowler and a right-handed tail-end batsman who made his first-class debut in 1952-53 for Natal aged 17. He played only 16 matches in 10 seasons before establishing himself in 1962-63 when, with the help of a sympathetic employer who let him leave work an hour early every day to practise,he took 19 wickets at 18.26, helping Natal win the Currie Cup, and earning selection for the tour of Australasia the following season.

Peter Laurence van der Merwe (1937-2013) Test Cap No.220

© ESPNcricinfo Ltd
Full name Peter Laurence van der Merwe
Born March 14, 1937, Paarl, Cape Province
Died January 23, 2013, Port Elizabeth, Cape Province (aged 75 years 315 days)
Major teams South Africa, Eastern Province, Western Province
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Slow left-arm orthodox
Other Referee

Profile
© International Cricket Council
Peter Laurence van der Merwe (born 14 March 1937 in Paarl, Cape Province - 23 January 2013 in Port Elizabeth, Cape Province ) was a former South African cricketer. Educated at St Andrew's College in Grahamstown and at the University of Cape Town, he played in fifteen Tests from 1963 to 1967.Peter van der Merwe was originally a slow left-arm bowler, but later developed into a genuine allrounder as his right-hand batting become more reliable, and towards the end of his career played as a specialist batsman. He was a shrewd captain, leading South Africa to series wins against England in 1965 and against Australia in 1966-67. Described as "a perfect ambassador", he was always courteous and gained tremendous loyalty from his players. After retiring, he pursued a successful business career but retained his links with the game. He was chairman of South Africa's selectors in the 1980s and early 1990s, and for eight years was an ICC match referee.

He began playing first-class cricket as a left-arm spinner for South African Universities, and was the principal spinner in the South African Fezela XI that toured England in 1961, but as his batting improved his bowling declined, and he didn't bowl at all in first-class cricket after the tour to Australasia in 1963-64. He played for Western Province from 1958-59 to 1965-66, then for Eastern Province from 1966-67 to 1968-69. He captained each team.

Joseph Titus Partridge (1932-1988) Test Cap No:216

© en.wikipedia.org
Full name Joseph Titus Partridge
Born December 9, 1932, Bulawayo, Rhodesia
Died June 6, 1988, Harare, Zimbabwe (aged 55 years 180 days)
Major teams Rhodesia, South Africa
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast-medium

Profile
© rhodesiansportprofiles.blogspot.com
One of the best swing bowlers of the past half-century, Joseph Titus Partridge, has finished his days in pathetic degradation. Rhodesian-born Partridge, for some years a vagrant alcoholic, turned a gun on himself on June 7 in a police station in a suburb of Harare after having been arrested for not paying a bill at a hotel. He was 55.Born in Bulawayo on Dec 9, 1932, he made his debut for Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) in 1951, but, with Adcock and Heine at their peak, it was some years before he earned higher consideration. In 1959-60 he had the remarkable figures of 7 for 9 against Border, and in 1961-62, when he took 53 wickets at only 13.98 in seven matches, he ran through Natal with 8 for 69 and 6 for 32 at Salisbury. When he broke the South African record with 64 wickets (16.68) in the 1962-63 season his claim to a Test trial was irresistible.

He went with Trevor Goddard's side to Australia and New Zealand in 1963-64, and was a huge success. Using the humidity and the breezes which have so often befriended medium-pacers at Australia's coastal cricket centres, Joe Partridge, bespectacled and so obviously a banker by occupation, purred in to take nine wickets in the NSW match and after an unsuccessful Test debut at Brisbane (where Ian Meckiff was no-balled for throwing) and five wickets at Melbourne, he took nine more in the Sydney Test, including Lawry, O'Neill, Burge, Booth (twice) and Shepherd. After a fairly barren time at Adelaide, where Barlow and Pollock had their marvellous stand of 341 and South Africa levelled at 1-1, Partridge put his personal seal on the series with 7 for 91 in Australia's first innings at Sydney in the excitingly drawn final Test.

Denis Thomson Lindsay (1939-2005) Test Cap No:215

© Getty image
Full name Denis Thomson Lindsay
Born September 4, 1939, Benoni, Transvaal
Died November 30, 2005, Johannesburg (aged 66 years 87 days)
Major teams South Africa, North Eastern Transvaal, Northern Transvaal, Transvaal
Batting style Right-hand bat
Fielding position Wicketkeeper
Other Referee

Profile
Denis Lindsay, the South African Test wicketkeeper-batsman of the 1960s, died in Johannesburg aged 66 on November 30. He is best remembered for his dominant role in the victorious 1966-67 home series against Bobby Simpson's Australians in which he scored 606 runs in seven innings at an average of 86.57. He also took a then South African record 24 catches.His cavalier feats in a maiden 3-1 series win over Australia are indelibly writ in the folklore of South African cricket; the audacious manner in which he turned potential disaster into triumph with a carefree disregard for the batting wreckage that lay around him was the difference between the sides.

Herbert Roy Lance (1940-2010) Test Cap No:214

Full name Herbert Roy Lance
Born June 6, 1940, Pretoria, Transvaal
Died November 10, 2010, Johannesburg (aged 70 years 157 days)
Major teams South Africa, North Eastern Transvaal, Northern Transvaal, Transvaal
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium

Profile
Herbert Roy "Tiger" Lance (6 June 1940 – 10 November 2010) was a South African cricketer.
Tiger Lance was born in Pretoria, Transvaal. He played in 13 Tests between 1962 and 1970 as an all-rounder.He was a forceful middle order batsman and useful seam bowler. His father William and his younger brother Anthony also played first-class cricket in South Africa.

His most successful series was against Australia in 1966-67, when he played several important innings after early wickets had fallen cheaply; he hit a six off the bowling of Ian Chappell to win not only the Fifth Test in Port Elizabeth, but also the series, South Africa's first series win against Australia in the eleventh series between the two countries. In the five Tests of the series he scored 261 runs at 37.28.

His form in domestic matches in 1969-70 was moderate and he was not selected for the First Test against Australia, but at the request of the captain Ali Bacher he was included in the side for the rest of the series.He was also selected for the 1970 tour of England and the 1971-72 tour of Australia, but neither series eventuated owing to anti-apartheid feeling in the host countries.He retired after the 1971-72 season.He died in hospital in Johannesburg, four weeks after the car he was driving was hit by a woman driving on the wrong side of the road.

Kenneth Alexander Walter (1939-2003) Test Cap No:211

Full name Kenneth Alexander Walter
Born November 5, 1939, Johannesburg, Transvaal
Died September 13, 2003, Sandton, Johannesburg (aged 63 years 312 days)
Major teams South Africa, Transvaal
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast

Profile
Kenneth Walter was lively opening bowler who made an impressive start to his career at just 18, against the 1957-58 touring Australians. With his fifth ball he claimed Colin McDonald and also dismissed Jim Burke and Richie Benaud. The following season he was selected for his Test debut against New Zealand - in the same match as Colin Bland and Peter Pollock - and started well, taking 4-63 at Durban. However, he only took one wicket in the second Test at Wanderers and ended with just two caps. He was also an accomplished golfer, winning the President's Cup in 1972.

Test debut South Africa v New Zealand at Durban, Dec 8-12, 1961
Last Test South Africa v New Zealand at Johannesburg, Dec 26-29, 1961
First-class span 1957-1966

Edgar John Barlow (1940-2005) Test Cap No:205

© Bob Thomas/Getty Images
Full name Edgar John Barlow
Born August 12, 1940, Pretoria, Transvaal
Died December 30, 2005, General Hospital, St Helier, Jersey (aged 65 years 140 days)
Major teams South Africa, Boland, Derbyshire, Eastern Province, Transvaal, Western Province
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium
Other Coach

Profile
Eddie Barlow batting for the 1965,
South Africans.....
© The Cricketer International
Barlow on the eve of the,
    1965 England tour...
© The Cricketer International
Eddie Barlow was a cricketer straight out of Boy's Own - incessantly enthusiastic and imbued with bottomless confidence. His nickname, "Bunter", was as much confirmation of that as it was a reflection of his facial resemblance to Billy Bunter, the chunky, bespectacled, British schoolboy of juvenile fiction. But Barlow was an athlete, and one who prized himself on his fitness and stamina. He was one of the most popular players of his generation, and never gave less than his all as an obdurate opening batsman, an aggressive medium-pacer and a superb slip field. Commentator Charles Fortune once described the often-untidy Barlow as running in to bowl "looking like an unmade bed". After retirement, Barlow was a liberal voice in the conservative South African political establishment of the 1980s.
He became a respected coach at provincial level, never without a theory that he said would lead to brighter cricket, and was appointed Bangladesh coach in 1999. However, a stroke in 2000 left him paralysed and he moved to north Wales where, despite his disabilities, he continued to coach locally. He died late in 2005 after a long battle against illness.

Test debut South Africa v New Zealand at Durban, Dec 8-12, 1961
Last Test South Africa v Australia at Port Elizabeth, Mar 5-10, 1970
First-class span 1959-1983

Atholl Henry McKinnon (1932-1983) Test Cap No:204

© en.wikipedia.org
Full name Atholl Henry McKinnon
Born August 20, 1932, Port Elizabeth, Cape Province
Died December 2, 1983, Durban, Natal (aged 51 years 104 days)
Major teams South Africa, Eastern Province, Transvaal
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Slow left-arm orthodox

Profile
Atholl Henry McKinnon, who died in Durban on December 2, 1983, aged 51, played eight times for South Africa between 1960 and 1967, taking 26 Test wickets at 35.57 apiece. As portly as he was affable, he belonged to the classical school of slow orthodox left-arm bowlers, length, line and flight playing at least as much a part as spin. Born at Port Elizabeth and educated, like the Pollock brothers, at Grey High School, McKinnon began his first-class career, in 1952-53, with Eastern Province and ended it, in 1967-68, with Transvaal. He toured England twice, in 1960 and 1965, being the only member of the 1965 team to have also been in the previous side. In 1964-65, when England were last in South Africa, McKinnon was brought into the South African side for the fourth Test. His four for 128 in 51 overs in England's first innings and three for 44 in 35 overs in the second showed him at his best, his control being excellent, his line off stump and outside. In South Africa in 1966-67 when, amid nation-wide excitement, the home side won a series against Australia for the first time, he played in the first two Tests. He was a burly tail-ender, who batted right-handed and had a top score of 62. After retiring he was a patient and popular cricket coach. His death, from a heart attack, came when he was managing the unofficial West Indian team touring South Africa. All told he took 470 first-class wickets (average 21.14) and scored 1,687 runs (average 15.06).

Test debut England v South Africa at The Oval, Aug 18-23, 1960
Last Test South Africa v Australia at Cape Town, Dec 31, 1966 - Jan 5, 1967
First-class span 1952-1969

Geoffrey Merton Griffin (1939-2006) Test Cap No:200

Fred Trueman bowled to give,
Geoff Griffin his hat-trick...
© The Cricketer International
Full name Geoffrey Merton Griffin
Born June 12, 1939, Greytown, Natal
Died November 16, 2006, Durban, Natal (aged 67 years 157 days)
Major teams Rhodesia, South Africa, Natal
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast

Profile
Griffin resorts to underarm bowling after being no-balled,
© PA Photos
Geoff Griffin was handicapped by an accident when a schoolboy which left him unable to fully straighten his right arm, and he was further burdened by his emergence at a time when throwing was cricket's major issue. Tall, blond and fast, he headed the national averages in his second season with 35 wickets at 12.23 and was an almost automatic choice for the 1960 tour of England despite murmurings regarding his action. The wheels came off at Lord's when he was no-balled eight times in the match against MCC, and then in the county matches at Nottingham and Southampton. At Lord's in his second Test he became the first South African to take a hat-trick in Tests and the first man to do so on the ground - but he was no-balled eleven times for throwing. To add insult to injury, he was again no-balled in an exhibition game staged as the Test ended early and had to complete his over underarm. He was finished as a bowler, although he remained with the squad and played as a batsman. He returned home and moved from Natal to Rhodesia, but within two years - and still only 23 years old - his career was over after he was repeatedly no-balled against North-Eastern Transvaal at Salisbury. A superb allround sportsman, Griffin played hockey for Rhodesia as well as holding Natal titles for high jump, long jump, triple jump and pole vault. He also played U-19 rugby for Natal. Griffin died of a heart attack in November 2006 aged 67.

Test debut England v South Africa at Birmingham, Jun 9-14, 1960
Last Test England v South Africa at Lord's, Jun 23-27, 1960 
First-class span1957-1963

Jonathan Payn Fellows-Smith (1932-2013) Test Cap # 199

© sgs-cricket.nl
Full name Jonathan Payn Fellows-Smith
Born February 3, 1932, Berea, Durban, Natal
Died September 28, 2013, Luton and Dunstable Hospital, Luton, Bedfordshire (aged 81 years 237 days)
Major teams South Africa, Hertfordshire, Marylebone Cricket Club, Northamptonshire, Oxford University, Transvaal
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium

Profile
Jonathan Payn Fellows-Smith played four Tests in 1960.all his four Test appearances coming on that one trip. A powerful and uncompromising right-hand batsman whose trademark shots were a hammered off and a variety of leg-side swipes, he was not stranger to English conditions as he had won three cricket Blues at Oxford (as well as one for rugby) and also played for Northamptonshire from 1957, making 109 and 65 not out on debut. He had a disappointing tour in 1960 although he finished with 863 runs at 31.96 and 32 wickets with his legspin. He only played two more first-class matches - both for Free Foresters against his old university - after that tour. In all, of his 94 first-class appearances, only 14 were made in South Africa.

Fellows-Smith, nicknamed "Pom Pom", was an aggressive right-handed middle order batsman and a useful right-arm medium pace bowler who played the bulk of his cricket in England. Appearing first as a student for Oxford University in 1953, he won his Blue that season and in the following two years as an all-rounder. He stayed in England after his university days and played fairly regularly for Northamptonshire in 1957, when the team equalled its highest-ever placing by coming second in the County Championship.

He finally played his first first-class cricket in his native country in 1958-59, turning out regularly for Transvaal that season, and the following season he scored 512 runs with two centuries at an average of 73.14, and was picked for the 1960 South African tour to England.The tour was not a success, hampered by bad weather and overshadowed by controversy over the bowling action of the fast bowler Geoff Griffin. For much of the tour, Fellows-Smith batted very low in the batting order. He returned respectable figures of 863 runs and 32 wickets, and he played in four of the five Tests, batting at number seven or eight in three of them, but promoted to number three for the final match at The Oval. He got a reasonable start in most of his Test innings, but his top score was only 35, and he was given little opportunity with the ball and failed to take a single Test wicket.After the 1960 tour, Fellows-Smith played one more first-class match in South Africa and just two more in England, both for Free Foresters against his former university. In 1966, he played Minor Counties cricket for Hertfordshire.Fellows-Smith was also a rugby union player who won a Blue for Oxford.

Test debut England v South Africa at Birmingham, Jun 9-14, 1960
Last Test England v South Africa at The Oval, Aug 18-23, 1960
First-class span 1953-1964
List A span 1966-1966

Christopher George de Villiers Burger (1935-2014) Test Cap No:197

Full name Christopher George de Villiers Burger
Born July 12, 1935, Randfontein, Transvaal
Died June 5, 2014, Howick, KwaZulu-Natal (aged 78 years 328 days)
Major teams South Africa, Free Foresters, Natal
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium

Profile
Christopher George de Villiers Burger (born 12 July 1935 in Randfontein, Transvaal) is a former South African cricketer who played in two Tests in 1958.

Test debut South Africa v Australia at Johannesburg, Feb 7-12, 1958
Last Test South Africa v Australia at Port Elizabeth, Feb 28-Mar 4, 1958
First-class span 1955-1966

Christopher Anthony Russell Duckworth (1933-2014) Test Cap # 196

Springbok Chris Duckworth gets a Smile and a Handshake from the Queen
© oncecalledhome.com
Full name Christopher Anthony Russell Duckworth
Born March 22, 1933, Que Que (now Kwekwe), Rhodesia
Died May 16, 2014, Johannesburg (aged 81 years 55 days)
Major teams Rhodesia, South Africa, Natal
Batting style Right-hand bat
Fielding position Wicketkeeper

Profile
Christopher Anthony Russell Duckworth is a former amateur South African cricketer who played in two Tests in 1957. He was born in Que Que, Southern Rhodesia (now Kwekwe, Zimbabwe).He also played hockey for Rhodesia, rugby for Natal U19 and league tennis in Johannesburg.

Both Tests against England in the 1956–57 series were won by South Africa, the fourth at the Wanderers, Johannesburg, and the fifth at St George's Park, Port Elizabeth. Captain Clive van Ryneveld presented him with a commemorative stump at the conclusion of each contest. In first-class cricket, Duckworth played two seasons from 1952–53 for Natal while at University in Pietermaritzburg, scoring a century in his second match. In 1954–55 he returned to Rhodesia and in the mid-summer of 1963 was asked by the Rhodesian selectors to spearhead the National side, an honour he declined as he and his family were shortly due to emigrate to South Africa, where, in Johannesburg, at John Waite's invitation, he played for his Wanderers side in the 1965–66 season.

He was reserve wicketkeeper on two overseas tours, both to England, in 1955 and 1960, but was not picked for any of the Tests on either tour. He hit his highest first-class score, 158, against Northamptonshire on the 1955 tour. Jack Cheetham, captain of the 1955 tourists in his book I Declare wrote: "Duckworth played some beautiful innings, the one at Northampton possibly the most correct of the tour".

In the 33 matches he played for South Africa, he was on the winning side 21 times, against only two losses. Both defeats occurred on the 1960 tour, once at Northampton after Duckworth had scored 51 not out in a second innings total of 101 for 7 before an adventurous declaration by Jackie McGlew, the other on a ghastly wicket at Bristol.

Test debut South Africa v England at Johannesburg, Feb 15-20, 1957
Last Test South Africa v England at Port Elizabeth, Mar 1-5, 1957
First-class span 1952-1963

Anthony John Pithey (1933-2006) Test Cap No:195

© ESPNcricinfo Ltd
Full name Anthony John Pithey
Born July 17, 1933, Umtali (now Mutare), Rhodesia
Died November 17, 2006, Southbroom, Natal (aged 73 years 123 days)
Major teams Rhodesia, South Africa, Western Province
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm offbreak

Profile
Rhodesian-born Tony Pithey's 17-Test career had one distinct highlight: a patient 154 against England at Cape Town in 1964-65. It was his only Test hundred. Able to bat as an opener or lower down the order, he was an accumulator rather than a strokemaker, and was fearless against fast bowling. His final Test series - against England - was his best, with his 462 runs coming at 51.33. But his runs came slowly - the 154, made on a good pitch, took six hours and his 95 in the next Test was equally pedestrian. He was named in the side to tour England in 1965 but didn't make the trip, withdrawing for business reasons. His brother David also played eight Tests for South Africa.

Tony Pithey, who has died in Durban after a long illness aged 73, was brought up in Rhodesia at the border town (between Rhodesia and Botswana) of Plumtree and was the elder of two brothers to represent South Africa. He played 17 Tests for his country while David, an offspinner, played eight. Pithey was a solid, rather than enterprising, right-hand batsman with a good technique against the new ball who represented South Africa as opening batsman and later at No.3. He toured England in 1960 and Australasia in 1963-64 and played home series against England in 1956-57 and 1964-65. His best series was the last, when he made his only Test century, taking more than seven hours to make 154 at Newlands. After retiring he remained in the administration of the game and was part of the historic selection panel when South Africa returned to international cricket in 1991.

Test debut South Africa v England at Durban, Jan 25-30, 1957
Last Test South Africa v England at Port Elizabeth, Feb 12-17, 1965
First-class span 1950-1969

Alistair Innes Taylor (1925-2004) Test Cap No:194

© writestuffautographs.com
Full name Alistair Innes Taylor
Born July 25, 1925, Johannesburg, Transvaal
Died February 7, 2004, Randjes Estate, Highlands North, Johannesburg (aged 78 years 197 days)
Major teams South Africa, Transvaal
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak

Profile
A dependable opening batsman, Scotch Taylor played one Test for South Africa, against England at The Wanderers in 1956-57, making 12 and 6. But he was a much better allround sportsman than that one outing suggests.Educated at King Edward V11 School, he went on to gain a mining degree at Witwatersrand University before making his first-class debut for Transvaal in 1949-50, months after making his state hockey debut. The following season he made his maiden hundred, and he was generally considered unlucky to miss the 1955 tour of England after topping the Currie Cup averages.

His chance came in 1957-57 when Jackie McGlew was unable to play in the first Test against England. He opened with Trevor Goddard in the first Test ever at the New Wanderers ground. His first-innings 12 took 106 minutes, but South Africa collapsed second time round. McGlew returned for the second Test at Newlands.After retiring from cricket at the end of the 1960-61 summer, he remained active in squash and bowls, and was subsequently president of the South African Hockey Union and an administrator for Transvaal hockey.

Only Test South Africa v England at Johannesburg, Dec 24-29, 1956
First-class span 1949-1961

Peter Samuel Heine (1928-2005) Test Cap No:193

© The Cricketer International
Full name Peter Samuel Heine
Born June 28, 1928, Winterton, Natal
Died February 4, 2005, Johannesburg (aged 76 years 221 days)
Major teams South Africa, North Eastern Transvaal, Orange Free State, Transvaal
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast

Profile
© The Cricketer International
Peter Samuel Heine, who died in Pretoria on February 4 aged 76, formed a renowned fast bowling partnership for South Africa with Neil Adcock. He played in 14 Test matches, spread over almost seven years, 12 of which were in tandem with Adcock. Peter Pollock, who later formed a similarly feared new-ball partnership with Mike Procter, said: "Adcock was quicker but Heine put the heat into the combination." Adcock said that he and Heine were good friends. "We would have a few drinks together in the evenings and work out which one of us would knock over which batsman. He was very aggressive on the field, with a big heart, but meek and mild off it." Stories of his aggression were numerous. After felling Peter Richardson, the England opener, during the 1956-57 series, he allegedly said: "Get up, I want to hit you again." Heine only started playing cricket at the age of 19 when, working as a fireman in Pietermaritzburg, he was pressed into playing for the fire department. "You are big and strong so you can open the bowling," he was told. He was also a hard-hitting lower-order batsman who hit a straight six off Hugh Tayfield which was reported to have carried a world record 180 yards in a match between Orange Free State and Natal in Bloemfontein in 1954-55. It was a massive hit, although subsequent research reduced the estimated distance by between 20 and 30 yards. He made his debut in the second Test at Lord's in 1955, taking 5 for 60 in the first innings.

Richard John Westcott (1927-2013) Test Cap No.191

© remembered.co.za
Full name Richard John Westcott
Born September 19, 1927, Lisbon, Portugal
Died January 16, 2013, Hermanus, Western Cape (aged 85 years 119 days)
Major teams South Africa, Western Province
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium

Profile
Richard John Westcott (born 19 September 1927 in Lisbon, Portugal) is a former South African cricketer who played in five Tests from 1954 to 1958. He is the only Test cricketer to have been born in Portugal.Moises Henriques is the only other Portuguese born international cricketer, however he is yet to play Test cricket.Dick Westcott was an adventurous right-handed opening batsman and a capable but underused right-arm medium pace bowler who played for Western Province throughout the 1950s. He scored a century in his third match in 1950-51. Early in his career he was involved in a car crash which caused severe damage to his left arm, but he continued to play at a high standard.

David Ernest James Ironside (1925-2005) Test Cap No:190

Full name David Ernest James Ironside
Born May 2, 1925, Lourenco Marques, Mozambique
Died August 21, 2005, Birmingham, England (aged 80 years 111 days)
Major teams South Africa, Transvaal
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast-medium

Profile
David Ernest James Ironside, died in Birmingham on August 21, 2005, aged 80. Ironside was the first - and so far only - Test cricketer from Mozambique, having been born in Lourenço Marques (now Maputo). A tearaway fast bowler in his youth, Ironside settled down, after suffering knee trouble, to become a handy swing bowler. "He could swing it like a boomerang," recalled Neil Adcock, a team-mate for Transvaal and South Africa. Ironside won three Test caps against the touring New Zealanders in 1953-54, seizing eight for 88 in the match on his debut at Johannesburg. Different balls were used in the subsequent matches, and Ironside found them more difficult to move off the straight, but he had taken 15 wickets at 18.33 before the Fifth Test, which he missed after ricking his back on the plane. That was the end of his Test career, although he played on for two more seasons with Transvaal. He was an accountant in Johannesburg before moving to live with his daughter in England.

Test debut South Africa v New Zealand at Johannesburg, Dec 24-29, 1953
Last Test South Africa v New Zealand at Johannesburg, Jan 29-Feb 2, 1954
First-class span 1947-1956

Neil Amwin Treharne Adcock (1931-2013) Test Cap No:189

© remembered.co.za
Full name Neil Amwin Treharne Adcock
Born March 8, 1931, Sea Point, Cape Town, Cape Province
Died January 6, 2013, Howick, KwaZulu-Natal (aged 81 years 304 days)
Major teams South Africa, Natal, Transvaal
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast

Profile
© Wisden Cricket Monthly
Neil Adcock was the first South African quick bowler to take 100 Test wickets. Unlike Procter, the Pollocks and Donald, Neil Adcock did not have the benefit of world-class support, but he still managed 104 wickets at an average of only 21. He used his height to make the ball lift alarmingly off a length. In England in 1960, Adcock was a revelation, brushing off the controversy surrounding his new-ball partner Geoff Griffin - who was no-balled for throwing - to take 26 wickets in the Tests, even though South Africa lost the series 3-0. On the whole tour, he took 108 wickets at an average of 14, and was named as one of Wisden's Cricketers of the Year in 1961 as a result.

Neil Amwin Treharne Adcock (8 March 1931 – 6 January 2013) was a South African international cricketer who played 26 Tests.[1] A tall aggressive fast bowler, he could lift the ball sharply off a length. He was the first South African player to take 100 Test wickets.Adcock was born on 8 March 1931 in Sea Point, Cape Town. Making his Test debut in 1953 at home against New Zealand, he had only 9 first-class games to his name. He finished the series with 24 wickets, including 8 for 87 in his second Test (Total for both innings).

Adcock was one of the five Wisden Cricketers of the Year in 1961. The previous year in South Africa's tour of England he took 26 wickets in the Tests and 108 wickets in total at an average of 14. In doing so he became the only fast bowler to take more than 100 wickets in the same tour of England. It was a controversial tour with his bowling partner Geoff Griffin being no-balled for throwing. Adcock was the first South African fast bowler to take 100 International test wickets.After retiring from cricket he became a radio commentator and worked in the travel industry. Neil Adcock leaves behind his wife Maureen, his children from his first marriage to the late Diana (nee Devine) Adcock, daughter Susan Dance, his son Alan and three grandchildren

Test debut South Africa v New Zealand at Durban, Dec 11-15, 1953
Last Test South Africa v New Zealand at Port Elizabeth, Feb 16-20, 1962
First-class span 1952-1963

Headley James Keith (1927-1997) Test Cap No:188

Full name Headley James Keith
Born October 25, 1927, Dundee, Natal
Died November 17, 1997, Pennington, Natal (aged 70 years 23 days)
Major teams South Africa, Natal
Batting style Left-hand bat
Bowling style Slow left-arm orthodox

Profile
Headley James Keith, who died on November 17, 1997, aged 70, was a left-hand batsman, strong off the back foot, who was an important component of the powerful Natal batting line-up of the 1950s. Keith failed to make a successful transition into Test cricket, though he toured both Australia and England, and in 1952-53 became the first South African to score two centuries in a match in Australia: against Victoria at the MCG. He made his debut in the Melbourne Test, scoring 40 not out to seal victory and square the series; he also made 57 in the Lord's Test of 1955 and 73 at Leeds two Tests later. Both times he was watchful rather than dominant. Keith played eight Tests in all, but did little in the others. He was a useful slow left-armer at Currie Cup level.

Test debut Australia v South Africa at Melbourne, Feb 6-12, 1953
Last Test South Africa v England at Durban, Jan 25-30, 1957
First-class span 1950-1958

Edward Russell Henry Fuller (1931-2008) Test Cap No:187

Full name Edward Russell Henry Fuller
Born August 2, 1931, Worcester, Cape Province
Died July 19, 2008, Milnerton, Cape Town (aged 76 years 352 days)
Major teams South Africa, Western Province
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast-medium

Profile
Edward Russell Henry Fuller (2 August 1931 – 19 July 2008) was a South African cricketer who played in seven Tests from 1953 to 1957. He was born in Worcester, Western Cape and died in Milnerton, Cape Town.Eddie Fuller was a right-handed lower-order batsman who made useful runs in domestic South African cricket and a bowler of right-arm medium-fast cutters. In Test cricket, he was primarily used as a bowler and his Test highest score was only 17.He made his first-class debut for Western Province in two matches in the 1950–51 season, but came to prominence at the start of the 1951–52 season by taking 10 wickets in just his third first-class match: he took three Transvaal wickets for 47 runs in the first innings and followed that with seven for 54 in the second to finish with match figures of 10 for 101.With a further five-wicket haul a month later against Natal, Fuller was picked, after just nine first-class games, for the South African tour of Australia and New Zealand in 1952–53.The South Africans who toured Australia and New Zealand in 1952-53. Eddie Fuller is third from the right in the back row.

Anton Ronald Andrew Murray (1922-1995) Test Cap No:186

Full name Anton Ronald Andrew Murray
Born April 30, 1922, Grahamstown, Cape Province
Died April 17, 1995, Cape Town, Cape Province (aged 72 years 352 days)
Major teams South Africa, Eastern Province
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm slow-medium

Profile
Anton Ronald Andrew Murray (30 April 1922 in Grahamstown, Cape Province – 17 April 1995 in Cape Town, Cape Province) was a South African cricketer who played in 10 Tests in a little over a year from December 1952 to February 1954, appearing four times against Australia and then six times against New Zealand. He later toured England as a member of the 1955 South African side but did not appear in any of the Tests there. Outside cricket, he was a schoolmaster who founded a noted school in Pretoria.Anton Murray was a tall and athletic cricketer: a useful middle or lower order right-handed batsman and a right-arm slow-to-medium-pace bowler who used a lot of variations of pace. He played South African domestic first-class cricket from the 1947-48 season, and had a sensational first season for Eastern Province, scoring 133, which proved to be his highest first-class score, in only his second match, the game against Western Province at Cape Town.Later in the same season, he took seven wickets for 30 runs, his best single-innings haul, in the match against Orange Free State at Bloemfontein.

Kenneth James Funston (1925-2005) Test Cap No:185

© en.wikipedia.org
Full name Kenneth James Funston
Born December 3, 1925, Pretoria, Transvaal
Died April 15, 2005, Cape Town (aged 79 years 133 days)
Major teams South Africa, North Eastern Transvaal, Orange Free State, Transvaal
Batting style Right-hand bat
Other Administrator

Profile
Kenneth James Funston, died on April 15, 2005, aged 79. An aggressive presence in the middle order, Ken Funston played 18 Tests for South Africa in the 1950s. But he never reached a Test century, and in a team that valued stickability, he was often criticised for starting well and getting out. His nearest miss, 92 at Adelaide, came on the 1952-53 tour, when the South Africans stunned Australia with their athleticism; Funston, lurking in the covers, was an integral part of that. But his place was never secure: he missed the 1955 tour of England, and his best match was a heavy defeat: he scored 70 and 64 not out against the 1957-58 Australians at the Wanderers when he joined Jackie McGlew in a brave, tedious and ultimately futile rearguard action. Most of Funston's domestic matches were for Transvaal, and he also played provincial soccer and hockey. His son, Graham, was a stalwart for Griqualand West in the 1970s.

Test debut Australia v South Africa at Brisbane, Dec 5-10, 1952
Last Test South Africa v Australia at Port Elizabeth, Feb 28-Mar 4, 1958
First-class span 1946-1962

William Russell Endean (1924-2003) Test Cap No:184

© Wisden Cricket Monthly
Full name William Russell Endean
Born May 31, 1924, Parkview, Johannesburg, Transvaal
Died June 28, 2003, Kingston-upon-Thames, Surrey (aged 79 years 28 days)
Major teams South Africa, Marylebone Cricket Club, Transvaal
Batting style Right-hand bat
Fielding position Wicketkeeper

Profile
© Getty image
One of the great fielders who sparked the post-war revival of South African cricket, Russell Endean, died in England, aged 79. Although he made his debut as a wicketkeeper, Endean took the bulk of his 41 catches in the outfield, often as a part of the offensive ring that supported Hugh Tayfield's extraordinarily accurate off-spinners.

Endean was also involved in two of the game's oddest dismissals. At The Oval in 1951 Len Hutton's first contact with a ball from Athol Rowan made the ball loop towards the debutant's gloves. Hutton's subsequent swish at the ball brought an appeal and Hutton became the first Test cricketer to be given out obstructing the field. Five years later Endean was the first Test player to be dismissed handled the ball when he fended off a Jim Laker delivery at Newlands.

The high point of Endean's career was the 1952-53 tour of Australia. Written off as no-hopers, Jack Cheetham's team set new standards in fielding. Endean's one-handed boundary catch of a huge hit by Keith Miller off Tayfield is remembered as among the most brilliant of all time. Endean's century (162 not out) in this Melbourne Test was to be the South Africans' only one of the series. Endean's second-innings 70 also helped South Africa to a rubber-equalling win when they returned to Melbourne for the final Test.

Percy Neville Frank Mansell (1920-1995) Test Cap No:183

© rhodesiansportprofiles.blogspot.com/
Full name Percy Neville Frank Mansell
Born March 16, 1920, St George's, Telford, Shropshire, England
Died May 9, 1995, Somerset West, Cape Province (aged 75 years 54 days)
Major teams Rhodesia, South Africa
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak googly

Profile
© ESPNcricinfo Ltd
Percy Mansell was one of a selection of cricketers from Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) who played Test cricket for South Africa, Percy Mansell, who died in Somerset West on May 9, aged 75, toured England in 1951 and 1955 and Australasia in 1952-53. His value was fourfold: he bowled legbreaks and googlies with skill and stamina; batted well in the middle order; had safe hands at slip or short leg; and when conditions suited, he also bowled seamers.

Born in Shropshire on March 16, 1920, Percy Neville Frank Mansell made his first-class debut as a 16-year-old schoolboy in 1936-37. Two years later he made 62 against Hammond's visiting MCC team at Bulawayo. The war took vital years, but upon resumption of cricket he soon made his mark, scoring a maiden hundred (against Transvaal) in 1946-47. His bowling took longer to mature, but in 1949-50 he took 6 for 89 against the touring Australians, and a year later, with a South African tour of England in the offing, he performed well with bat and ball, principally in the match against NE Transvaal, when he had match figures of 10 for 167.

Roy Alastair McLean (1930-2007) Test Cap No:182

© smh.com.au
Full name Roy Alastair McLean
Born July 9, 1930, Pietermaritzberg, Natal
Died August 26, 2007, Johannesburg, Gauteng, South Africa (aged 77 years 48 days)
Major teams South Africa, Natal
Batting style Right-hand bat

Profile
© Getty image
Roy McLean's emotional coming of age took place in the fifth Test of the 1952-53 tour of Australia, when he made an unbeaten 76 in the fourth innings to lead South Africa to an astonishing series-levelling victory after the Aussies had scored 520. A cemented fixture in the middle order thereafter, McLean played through the good times and the bad until the disastrous 1960 tour of England -

on which only he and fast bowler Neil Adcock performed well and were named Wisden Cricketers of the Year as a result. South African cricket had reached a nadir. A year later McLean led an unofficial tour to England by a team called the Fezelas. It proved to be the rebirth of South African cricket. No fewer than eight future Springboks were on board, including Eddie Barlow, Colin Bland, Peter Pollock and Denis Lindsay - Graeme Pollock just missed out, although everyone knew he was a future international. McLean is thus credited with being the father of the great Springbok teams of the 1960s that were prevented from testing themselves against the Rest of the World from 1970 onwards because of apartheid-induced isolation.

Test debut England v South Africa at Manchester, Jul 5-10, 1951
Last Test South Africa v England at Johannesburg, Dec 23-29, 1964
First-class span 1949-1966

John Henry Bickford Waite (1930-2011) Test Cap No:181

John Waite keeps wicket for South Africa against England,
© Dennis Oulds
Full name John Henry Bickford Waite
Born January 19, 1930, Johannesburg, Transvaal
Died June 22, 2011, Johannesburg (aged 81 years 154 days)
Major teams South Africa, Eastern Province, Transvaal
Batting style Right-hand bat
Fielding position Wicketkeeper

Profile
Johnny Waite was something of a legend for over a decade of Springbok cricket during the 1950s and '60s, as he became the first man to represent his country in 50 Tests - and the only one to do so in the pre-isolation era. First selected in 1951 as a 21-year-old wicketkeeper-batsman, Waite showed he was no shrinking violet by joining his uncle, Eric Rowan, in a remarkable display of protest when both sat down on the pitch while batting against Lancashire after being slow-handclapped. Waite's pugnacity as a batsman, the strength of his character and his skill with the gloves meant that he displaced first-choice keeper Russell Endean and played in the first four Tests of the series. Waite was chosen as Endean's understudy once more for the 1952-53 tour of Australia, but again rose quickly to the top forcing Endean to reinvent himself, successfully, as a specialist batsman. Most of Waite's long list of national records have now been surpassed by Dave Richardson and Mark Boucher, although he still holds, with Boucher, the record for the most dismissals in a 5 Test series 26.

Test debut England v South Africa at Nottingham, Jun 7-12, 1951
Last Test South Africa v England at Port Elizabeth, Feb 12-17, 1965
First-class span 1948-1966

Derrick John McGlew (1929-1998) Test Cap No:179

Full name Derrick John McGlew
Born March 11, 1929, Pietermaritzberg, Natal
Died June 9, 1998, Craighill Park, Johannesburg, Transvaal (aged 69 years 90 days)
Major teams South Africa, Natal
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak googly
Other Referee

Profile
© Getty image
Jackie McGlew died from a blood disorder in Pretoria on June 9, 1998, aged 69. Jackie McGlew became synonymous with South African cricket in the 1950s. His batting fitted his name: he was a sticker, and concentration, discipline, commitment and athleticism were the abiding virtues of his own game, and that of his team. He became famous - or notorious - for some of Test cricket's slowest innings. He batted nine hours 35 minutes for 105 against Australia at Durban in 1957-58; his 545-minute century remained the slowest in first-class cricket for 20 years. Although as a feat of endurance and concentration it was remarkable, said Wisden, it is doubtful whether South Africa benefited by it. They led by 221 on first innings but could not bowl Australia out. McGlew grew up in Natal, and was pictured waving a bat as a four-year-old. He went on to captain the province's schoolboys, and made his debut for Natal in 1947-48. In 1951 he was picked to tour England on the strength of 138 in a 12-a-side (and thus non-first-class) Test trial at Kingsmead.

He hit 40 when South Africa won at Trent Bridge but failed in his next three innings, and was dropped. But he scored consistently in the county games, and his agile fielding in the deep was widely noted. When the young South Africa team stunned Australia by drawing their series 18 months later, McGlew was established as the opening bat and, aged only 23, as vice-captain. Though he missed the crucial win at the MCG through injury, he returned in New Zealand with 255 not out in eight hours 54 minutes, then South Africa's highest Test score. He was on the field throughout the match. Back in England in 1955, he scored centuries in both South Africa's Test wins, at Manchester and Leeds, having bagged a pair at Lord's the game before. McGlew was captain in both games because Jack Cheetham was injured; South Africa lost the other three Tests. McGlew was a Cricketer of the Year; Wisden noted both his dourness at the crease and his vitality in the field. Attrition is not a popular method of progress. McGlew himself has not always batted this way, but circumstances wrought the change of style.

Test debut England v South Africa at Nottingham, Jun 7-12, 1951
Last Test South Africa v New Zealand at Port Elizabeth, Feb 16-20, 1962
First-class span 1947-1967
ODI debut Zimbabwe v New Zealand at Bulawayo, Oct 31, 1992
Last ODIZimbabwe v New Zealand at Harare, Nov 8, 1992

Geoffrey Walter Ashton Chubb (1911-1982) Test Cap No:178

Full name Geoffrey Walter Ashton Chubb
Born April 12, 1911, East London, Cape Province
Died August 28, 1982, East London, Cape Province (aged 71 years 138 days)
Major teams South Africa, Border, Transvaal
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium-fast

Profile
Geoffrey Walter Ashton Chubb, who died in East London on August 28, 1982, at the age of 71, played five times for South Africa against England in England in 1951 and served two terms as President of the South African Cricket Association. At 40 years 56 days he was the oldest South African to make a Test début. It happened at Trent Bridge, and when England went in late on the second day, facing a total of 483, he had Ikin caught at slip with his third ball and finished with four for 146 off 46 overs. He and McCarthy reduced England from 375 for three to 419 all out and gave South Africa the chance to record their first win in England for sixteen years. Chubb's best Test figures came at Old Trafford when he took six for 51 in England's first innings. With 21 wickets in the series at 27.47 apiece, he headed the bowling averages for South Africa. He was also their leading wicket-taker in all first-class matches on the tour, capturing 72 at 26.84 apiece and bowling over 150 overs more than anyone else.

Born in Rhodesia, Chubb began his first-class career as an opening batsman for Border in 1931-32, but on moving to Johannesburg concentrated on his bowling. He worked hard at perfecting his medium-paced seamers and developing a high degree of accuracy. Fair-haired, studious and bespectacled, he was a disarmingly effective bowler and immensely popular. After his retirement in 1951, at the end of his tour of England, he devoted his energies to cricket administration, becoming a national selector and, from 1955 to 1957 and again from 1959 to 1960, President of the SACA. In all first-class cricket he took 160 wickets at an average of 23.91, scored 835 runs (average 18.15) and held twelve catches.

Test debut England v South Africa at Nottingham, Jun 7-12, 1951
Last Test England v South Africa at The Oval, Aug 16-18, 1951
First-class span 1931-1951

Paul Lyndhurst Winslow (1929-2011) Test Cap No:177

© Getty image
Full name Paul Lyndhurst Winslow
Born May 21, 1929, Johannesburg, Transvaal
Died May 24, 2011, Rosebank Netcare Clinic, Rosebank, Johannesburg (aged 82 years 3 days)
Major teams Rhodesia, South Africa, Sussex, Transvaal
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak

Profile
Paul Winslow gained the reputation of a big hitter and throughout his career attacked the bowling, in contrast to most of the batsmen of his era. His most memorable innings in his five Tests came in the third Test at Old Trafford in 1955. South Africa went into the match trailing 2-0, and in reply to England's 284, were 245 for 5 when Winslow joined wicketkeeper John Waite. The pair added 171 for the sixth wicket, Waite scoring 113 and Winslow 108. Winslow brought up his maiden first-class hundred with a towering straight six off Tony Lock which sailed out of the ground. Set 145 at a little over a run-a-minute, South Africa scrambled home by three wickets with minutes to spare, Winslow making a rapid 16. Winslow failed in the fourth Test - also won by South Africa - and thereafter did nothing of note in his career except for scoring 81 and 139 for Rhodesia against the touring Australian team of 1957-58 in Salisbury. There was talk of him being recalled for the Test series, but this did not happen. He did, however, play for a South African XI in a match at Loftus Versfeld, Pretoria, scoring 12 and 22.

Winslow was educated at King Edward VII and represented the SA Nuffield XI in 1947 and 1948 before playing for Sussex second XI in 1949. He played in one first-class match for Sussex against Cambridge University two weeks before his 20th birthday. Returning to South Africa, he played for Transvaal in two matches against Lindsay Hassett's 1949-50 touring Australian team, making his Test debut in the fourth match of the series at Ellis Park, with little success. In 1954-55 he had a successful season for Transvaal, scoring 379 runs (42.11) with a highest of 94 and was recalled for the tour of England. In 22 matches on tour he scored 758 runs at an average of 23.68, 156 of the runs in the three Tests he played (26.00). Against Lancashire he smashed 61 in only 43 minutes, smiting spinner Jack Ikin for 30 (4,4,6,6,4,6) off an over. He retired at the end of the 1959-60 at the age of 30 to concentrate on his business career, and remained in South Africa. Winslow died in May 2011, days after his 82nd birthday, at Rosebank Netcare Clinic, Rosebank, Johannesburg. He was survived by his wife, Moira, who he met on the 1955 tour.

Test debut South Africa v Australia at Johannesburg, Feb 10-14, 1950
Last Test England v South Africa at Leeds, Jul 21-26, 1955
First-class span 1949-1962

Michael George Melle (1930-2003) Test Cap No:176

Full name Michael George Melle
Born June 3, 1930, Forest Town, Johannesburg, Transvaal
Died December 28, 2003, Betty's Bay, Western Cape, South Africa (aged 73 years 208 days)
Major teams South Africa, Transvaal, Western Province
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast

Profile
Michael George Melle (3 June 1930 in Johannesburg, Transvaal – 28 December 2003 in Betty's Bay, South Africa) was a South African cricketer who played in seven Tests from 1950 to 1953. Melle was educated at Hilton College.

A "genuinely fast right-arm bowler",Melle made his first-class debut for Transvaal at the age of 18 against the touring MCC in Johannesburg in 1948-49, opening the bowling and taking one wicket. For his next match he was selected to play for a South African XI against the touring Australians in 1949-50 and took 4 for 82. After two matches for Transvaal against the Australians he was selected to open the bowling with Cuan McCarthy in the Fourth Test in Johannesburg, having taken just six first-class wickets at 38.33. Still only 19 years old, he took 5 for 113 and 1 for 58 in a drawn match,then 2 for 132 in the Fifth Test in Port Elizabeth, which Australia won by an innings.

Hugh Joseph Tayfield (1929-1994) Test Cap No:173

© The Cricketer International
Full name Hugh Joseph Tayfield
Born January 30, 1929, Durban, Natal
Died February 24, 1994, Hillcrest, Natal (aged 65 years 25 days)
Major teams Rhodesia, South Africa, Natal, Transvaal
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm offbreak

Profile
© Getty image
Hugh Tayfield, who died in hospital at Durban on February 25, 1994, aged 65, was one of the most successful bowlers ever produced by South Africa and one of the greatest off-spinners the game has seen. Between 1949-50 and 1960 he took 170 wickets in Tests at a cost of 25.91 in 37 matches. Tayfield took more wickets per Test match (4.59) then either Jim Laker or Lance Gibbs (4.19 and 3.91), and though he was not in Laker's class as a spinner of the ball, he was exceptionally accurate and could bowl all day without wavering. He preferred to bowl over the wicket, extremely close to the stumps, which gave him the perfect angle for the ball to drift away and break back. Though his variations were subtle, his field settings were often flamboyantly unorthodox, with a large, tempting gap around extra cover but two straightish silly mid-ons waiting for the mistimed shot. Tayfield was, with Trevor Goddard, at the centre of South Africa's containing cricket of the 1950s; he bowled 137 consecutive balls without conceding a run against England at Durban in 1956-57. But, with South Africa's superb fielding to back him up, he ran through teams as well: he took 37 wickets that series at 17.18, including nine for 113 in the second innings of the Fourth Test at Johannesburg, when he bowled unchanged on the last day and sent down 35 eight-ball overs; the longer he bowled the more inhibited England's batsmen became. Tayfield was chaired off the field.

John Erskine Cheetham (1920-1980) Test Cap No:171

Full name John Erskine Cheetham
Born May 26, 1920, Mowbray, Cape Town, Cape Province
Died August 21, 1980, Parktown, Johannesburg, Transvaal (aged 60 years 87 days)
Major teams South Africa, Western Province
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak

Profile
Jack Cheetham, who died in hospital in Johannesburg on August 21, 1980, aged 60, served South African cricket with great distinction, both as player and administrator. In fifteen of his 24 Test matches he captained them with a firm yet understanding touch, and after his retirement he was, from 1969 to 1972, an outstanding President of the South African Cricket Association. He was an Honorary Life President of the Transvaal Cricket Union.

Lawrence Anderson Markham (1924-2000) Test Cap No:170

Full name Lawrence Anderson Markham
Born September 12, 1924, Mbabane, Swaziland
Died August 5, 2000, Pietermaritzburg, Natal (aged 75 years 328 days)
Major teams South Africa, Natal
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak
Relation Brother - NE Markham

Profile
Lawrence Anderson "Fish" Markham (born 12 September 1924 in Mbabane, Swaziland, died 5 August 2000 in Pietermaritzburg, Natal) was a South African cricketer who played in one Test in 1949.Markham was a right-handed lower-order batsman and a right-arm leg-break bowler. His single Test was the fourth match of the 1948-49 England tour series and he was the third spin bowler alongside Tufty Mann and Athol Rowan. He scored 20 in his single innings and took just one wicket in the game and was dropped for the next match..

Only Test South Africa v England at Johannesburg, Feb 12-16, 1949
First-class span 1946-1951