Friday, May 8

Reginald Oscar Schwarz (1875-1918) Test Cap No:59

© The Cricketer International
Full name Reginald Oscar Schwarz
Born May 4, 1875, Lee, London, England
Died November 18, 1918, Etaples, France (aged 43 years 198 days)
Major teams South Africa, Middlesex, Transvaal
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium, Right-arm offbreak

Profile
© En.wikipedia.org
Reggie Schwarz was one of the men who helped to put South African cricket on the world map. Educated at St Paul's School in London, he was an ordinary cricketer who played a few times for Middlesex before emigrating to South Africa. He returned with the 1904 South African side, and learned the art of bowling the googly from BJT Bosanquet, passing the knowledge on to his team-mates. While others embraced the googly into their repertoire, Schwarz used it as his stock delivery, relying on the ball picking up speed off the pitch and lifting sharply, often to packed leg-side fields. In 1904 he headed the bowling averages with 65 wickets at 18.26, and did so again in 1907 with 137 wickets at 11.70. he also enjoyed success in Australia in 1910-11, with 59 wickets at 25.00, including 5 for 102 and 6 for 47 in the first and fifth Tests at Sydney. Before emigrating to South Africa he played three times for England at rugby as a half-back, and won a Blue at Cambridge in 1893.

A quiet man, he died of Spanish Influenza on the Western Front seven days after the Armistice in 1918.Major Schwarz, as every one knows, was famous as a slow bowler. Few men did so much to establish the reputation of South African cricket. He learnt the game in England and played for Middlesex before going to South Africa. In those early days, however, he did not make any great mark. His fame began when he returned to this country with the South African team of 1904. Studying very carefully the method of B. J. T. Bosanquet, he acquired, and afterwards carried to a high standard, the art of bowling off-breaks with, to all appearance, a leg-break action.

George Aubrey Faulkner (1881-1930) Test Cap No:58

© The Cricketer International
Full name George Aubrey Faulkner
Born December 17, 1881, Port Elizabeth, Cape Province
Died September 10, 1930, Walham Green, Fulham, London, England (aged 48 years 267 days)
Major teams South Africa, Marylebone Cricket Club, Transvaal
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak googly
Other Coach

Profile
© The Cricketer International
One of the greatest allrounders and arguably - despite an unorthodox and extraordinary grip of the bat - the best of coaches. His pupils included Ian Peebles and ET KIllick. He made a double-hundred against Australia at Melbourne in 1910-11; but was this a finer feat than his 6 for 17 in the third Test ever played at Leeds? Some would say, rather, that he accomplished nothing better than his 153 followed by 6 for 64 against the Australians at the Saffrons, Eastbourne in 1921. Afflicted by melancholia, he died tragically by his own hand.

Major Aubrey Faulkner died of gas poisoning at the Faulkner School of Cricket, Ltd., on September 10, at the age of 48. During the South African War and whilst living in Cape Town, he received some coaching from Walter Richards, of Warwickshire, then engaged by Western Province, and later became not only one of the dominating figures in South African cricket but also one of the finest of allround players. One of the earliest exponents of the googly, he differed from other bowlers of that type because of his ability to send down quite a fast ball, almost a yorker, and when at his best, with faultless length, skill in turning the ball either way and a puzzling variation of flight he proved too much for some of the world's greatest batsmen.

Percy Sydney Twentyman-Jones (1876-1954) Test Cap No:57

Full name Percy Sydney Twentyman-Jones
Born September 13, 1876, Beaufort West, Cape Colony
Died March 8, 1954, Cape Town, Cape Province (aged 77 years 176 days)
Major teams South Africa, Western Province
Batting style Right-hand bat

Profile
Percy Sydney Twentyman-Jones (13 September 1876, Beaufort – 8 March 1954, Cape Town) was a South African sportsman who played international cricket in one Test in 1902, and international rugby union in three Tests in 1896.Twentyman-Jones played for Western Province from 1898 to 1905 as a right-handed batsman. He scored 33 and 50 (out of a total of just 80) against the touring Australian cricket team on a bad pitch and was picked for the third Test match at Cape Town. But he was dismissed without scoring in both innings.Twentyman-Jones also played rugby union for Western Province and South Africa as a wing. He played in three international matches for his country, all part of the 1896 British Isles tour of South Africa.Twentyman-Jones scored his first and only international try in the Third Test at Kimberley, though the South Africans lost the game 3-9. His final international was the Final Test of the tour, which saw the very first South African international victory, beating the tourists 5-0.Qualifying as a lawyer in 1898, Twentyman-Jones was appointed a judge in 1926 and had a prominent career in criminal cases. He was also a prominent sports administrator. His daughter passed his legal and other papers to the University of Cape Town Library in 1976: they include photographs of South African cricket teams from the 1880s and later.

Only Test South Africa v Australia at Cape Town, Nov 8-11, 1902
First-class span 1897-1906

Johannes Jacobus Kotze (1879-1931) Test Cap No:56

© The Cricketer International
Full name Johannes Jacobus Kotze
Born August 7, 1879, Hopefield, Cape Province
Died July 7, 1931, Rondebosch, Cape Town, Cape Province (aged 51 years 334 days)
Major teams South Africa, London County, Transvaal,Western Province
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast

Profile
© En.wikipedia.org
Johannes Jacobus Kotze, known as 'Kodgee', was one of the fastest bowlers in the history of the game. Born in Hopefield, Cape Province, he toured England with the 1901, 1904 (104 first-class wickets) and 1907 South African teams, having a good deal of success on the first two tours, when Tlum' Warner thought him to be second only to Kortright for speed.

How are we to gauge the pace of the fast men of yesteryear? Although the wicketkeeper, beefsteak in his gauntlets, usually stood up to the wicket for him, occasionally even effecting a legside stumping, his bowling evoked all the superlatives we have read in modern times of Tyson, Hall, Thomson and Holding. Like Tom Richardson,

James Henry Anderson (1874-1926) Test Cap No:55

Full name James Henry Anderson
Born April 26, 1874, Kimberley, Cape Province
Died March 11, 1926, Melkamer, Bredasdorp, Cape Province (aged 51 years 319 days)
Major teams South Africa, Western Province
Batting style Right-hand bat

Profile
Biddy Anderson captained South Africa in his only Test, against Australia at Johannesburg in 1902-03. Anderson made 32 but South Africa were heavily beaten; he was the only member of the side left out of the next Test. He played regularly for Western Province between 1894 and 1907; his only century, 109 against Border in 1903-04, exceeded the combined total of both Border innings (55 and 52).

Only Test South Africa v Australia at Johannesburg, Oct 18-21, 1902
First-class span 1894-1908